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8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8287? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

Original German War Merit Cross First Class Kriegsverdienstkreuz / post WW2 version (1957 pattern) – no swastika, VERY NICE CONDITION – WORKING PIN DEVICE, EARLY PERIOD ST&L (STEINHAUER & LUECK) MADE EXAMPLE WITH SOLID HINGEBLOCK – REALLY GOOD PIECE FROM THE 60′S. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses, Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. The War Merit Cross (Kriegsverdienstkreuz) and War Merit Medal (Kriegsverdienstmedaille) was a decoration of Nazi Germany during the Second World War, which could be awarded to civilians as well as military personnel. It was reissued in 1957 by the Bundeswehr in a De-Nazified version for veterans. This award was created by Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars (same medal but with a different ribbon). The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty (but not worthy of an Iron Cross which was more a bravery award), and without swords for meritorious service behind the lines which could also be awarded to civilians. Recipients had to have the lower grade of the award before getting the next level. There was also another version below the 2nd class simply called the War Merit Medal (German: Kriegsverdienstmedaille), set up in 1940 for civilians in order to offset the large number of 2nd class without swords being awarded. It was usually given to those workers in factories who significantly exceeded work quotas. One notable winner of the War Merit Cross was William Joyce (aka Lord Haw-Haw) who received both the second and first class, both without swords. Recipients of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross customarily received the medal from holders of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, to symbolize the link between the combat soldier and their supporters, who helped maintain the war effort. There was one extra grade of the War Merit Cross, which was created at the suggestion of Albert Speer: The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold, but this was never officially placed on the list of national awards as it came about in 1945 and there was no time to officially promulgate the award before the war ended. The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold (without swords) was awarded’on paper’ to two recipients on 20 April 1945: Franz Hahne and Karl-Otto Saur. The ribbon of the War Merit Cross was in red-white-black-white-red; that was, the red and black colors being reversed from the ribbon of the World War II version of the Iron Cross. The ribbon for the War Merit Medal was similar, but with a narrow red vertical red strip in the center of the black field. Soldiers who earned the War Merit Cross 2nd Class with Swords wore a small crossed-swords device on the ribbon. The War Merit Cross 1st Class was a pin-backed medal worn on the pocket of the tunic (like the Iron Cross 1st Class). The ribbon of the War Merit Cross 2nd Class could be worn like the ribbon of the Iron Cross 2nd Class (through the third buttonhole). Combat soldiers tended to hold the War Merit Cross in low regard, referring to its wearers as being in’Iron Cross Training’, and prior to 28 September 1941, the War Merit Cross could not be worn with a corresponding grade of the Iron Cross, which took precedence. A total of 118 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross with swords, and 137 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross without swords were awarded. Considering the relative rarity of the award compared with the grades of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, it took on extra meaning. For example, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring made a concerted effort to get Hitler to award him this order, much to Hitler’s annoyance. In response, Hitler outlined a series of criteria governing the awarding of this decoration and the philosophy of such awards, and directed that “prominent party comrades” were not to be awarded with the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross (or similar decorations), and withdrew the proposed awards of this order to Gauleiter Erich Koch and State Secretary Karl Hanke. Directing his comments at Göring personally, Hitler ordered that such attempts to gain this award be stopped (from a letter dated 27 August 1943 from Führerhauptquartier). Also, the scarcity of the award of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross compared with the Kinghts Cross of the Iron Cross gave it an “air of exclusiveness” it did not really deserve, as it ranked below the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross. Six persons received two Knights Cross’ of the War Merit Cross (one with Swords and one without Swords): Walter Brugmann, Julius Dorpmuller, Karl-Otto Saur, Albin Sawatzki, Walter Schreiber, and Walter Rohlandt. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Service: Army
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

10751? German army post WW2 1957 pattern Long Service Award 4 Years Medal

Original German post WW2 Military Long Service Medal for 4 Years / 1957 pattern, IN VERY GOOD WORN CONDITION – A VERY NICE DETAILED EARLY EXAMPLE ON GENUINE RIBBON, MAKER: ST&L (STEINHAUER & LUECK), THE AWARD IS NOT OFTEN SEEN. FEW FACTS ABOUT 1957 PATTERN AWARDS. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses, Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Long Service Award (Wehrmacht-Dienstauszeichnungen) – A year after the reinstitution of the draft Germany reinstated the Long Service Awards (March 16th, 1936). All members of the Armed Forces were eligible for the award which was bestowed in five classes; four years, twelve years, eighteen years, twenty five years and fifty years. The four year service medal was mat silver and had on the obverse the Wehrmacht Eagle and the inscription “Treue Diesnste in der Wehrmacht” (Loyal Service in the Armed Forces). On the reverse it bore only the number 4 in the center surrounded by oak leaves. The twelve year award was the same design but slightly larger, in bronze, and with the number “12″ replacing the “4″ on the reverse. Those who served eighteen years were presented a silver Maltese cross featuring the Wehrmacht eagle in the center obverse and the number “18″ on reverse. The same design was maintained for the next and highest class, awarded to those veterans who served twenty five years. The cross in this instance was gold, larger, and naturally had “25″ on the reverse. A special grade for 40 years of service was also approved; This was an oak leaves set which was worn on the ribbon of the 25 years award. All levels of the award were held on blue ribbons with the appropriate branch of service attached to it. It was either the spread wing eagle for the Army and Navy or the flying eagle for the Air Force. Only two long service awards were to be worn at the same time. The 4 and 12 year classes were obviously to be worn together, but once the individual received the 25 year class, he would wear it with the 4 year class, and if the 40 year class were achieved then it would be worn with the 12 year class. The award was worn as part of a group or in the ribbon bar for daily wear. During its early years of existence the award was normally constructed of German silver and heavily plated, but from 1942 on it was made from gold or silver washed zinc. During the last year of the war, presentation of the award ceased. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1945-Present

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

8225? German post WW1 cased Palatinate Association of the Economy Merit Medal

Genuine German post WW1 German Association of the Economy of the Palatinate Long Service Plaquette – pre 1933 issued example i n its genuine hardshelled case of issue with recessed medal bed. Fine bronze, obverse illustrating three standing figures in an Art Deco design, the Economy personified by a woman extending laurel branches in each hand, to a man with hammer to her right and to a man with a winged staff to her left, the men representing Commerce and Crafts, engraver marked “M” over “H” (Heinrich Friedrich Moshage – born November 12, 1896 in Osnabrück, died March 10, 1968 in Dusseldorf, he was a German sculptor, woodcarver, draftsman and engraver) below, reverse inscribed “FÜR LANGJÄHRIGE MITARBEIT IM DIENSTE DER PFÄLZISCHEN WIRTSCHAFT” (FOR LONG-TERM EMPLOYEMENT IN THE PALATINAN ECONOMY). Diameter: cca 81 mm, weight: cca 185 gramm including the case. A VERY ATTRACTIVE PLAQUETTE. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Badges
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Navy
  • Era: 1914-1945

7479? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Officer’s Cross Bundesverdienstkreuz

7479? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Officer's Cross Bundesverdienstkreuz

7479? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Officer's Cross Bundesverdienstkreuz

7479? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Officer's Cross Bundesverdienstkreuz

7479? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Officer's Cross Bundesverdienstkreuz

Original German Order of Merit Federal Republic post WW2 medal – Officer’s Cross, BEAUTIFUL CONDITION, INTACT ENAMEL, PERFECT PIN DEVICE, STEINHAUER UND LUCK – LUDENSCHEID (ST&L), SIZE: 55 MM. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. The Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (Verdienstorden der Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the only general state decoration of the Federal Republic of Germany. It has existed since 7 September 1951, and between 2,100 and 5,200 awards are given every year across all classes. Colloquially, the decorations of the different classes of the Order are known as Federal Cross of Merit (German: Bundesverdienstkreuz). Most of the German federal states (Bundesländer) have their own orders of merit, with up to three ranks (member, officer, commander). This excludes the Free and Hanseatic Cities of Bremen and Hamburg, which reject any orders; by old tradition their citizens, particularly former or present senators, will refuse any decoration in the form of an order (most famous example: former Chancellor Helmut Schmidt). Klasse (Officer’s Cross), Großes Verdienstkreuz (Halskreuz) Commander’s Cross or Grand Cross (Neck cross), Großes Verdienstkreuz mit Stern (Knight Commander’s Cross or Grand Cross with Star), Großes Verdienstkreuz mit Stern und Schulterband (Grand Cross with Star and Sash), international equivalent: Großkreuz 2. Klasse (Grand Cross of Merit, Second class) or Großkomturkreuz (Grand Commander’s Cross), Großkreuz (Grand Cross 1st class) and Sonderstufe des Großkreuzes (Grand Cross special class). The President of the Federal Republic holds the Sonderstufe des Großkreuzes ex officio. It is awarded to him in a ceremony by the President of the Bundestag attended by the Chancellor, the President of the Bundesrat and the Supreme Court President. Other than the President of the Federal Republic, only a foreign head of state can be awarded with the highest class. There is also the provision of awarding the Großkreuz in a special rare design, [1] which has so far only been used twice: for Konrad Adenauer and for Helmut Kohl. Except for the lowest class, the badge is the same for all classes, but with slightly different versions for men and women (slightly smaller badge and ribbon for women). The badge is a golden Cross enamelled in red, with a central disc bearing a black eagle. The star is a golden star with straight rays, its size and points vary according to class, with the badge superimposed upon it. The ribbon is red with gold-black-gold stripes. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

10390? German Order of Merit post WW2 medal Grand Cross Großes Verdienstkreuz

Original German post WW2 Federal Republic Order of Merit Grand Cross (Verdienstorden der Bundesrepublik Deutschland – Großes Verdienstkreuz), IN PERFECT CONDITION, ON GENUINE NECK RIBBON, INTACT ENAMEL, AN AMAZINGLY GOOD VERY EARLY (EARLY 50′S) STEINHAUER UND LUECK – LUDENSCHEID (ST&L) MADE EXAMPLE, SIZE: 71 x 60 mm, A BEAUTIFUL RARE VERY EARLY EXAMPLE. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. The Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (Verdienstorden der Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the only general state decoration of the Federal Republic of Germany. It has existed since 7 September 1951, and between 2,100 and 5,200 awards are given every year across all classes. Colloquially, the decorations of the different classes of the Order are known as Federal Cross of Merit (German: Bundesverdienstkreuz). Most of the German federal states (Bundesländer) have their own orders of merit, with up to three ranks (member, officer, commander). This excludes the Free and Hanseatic Cities of Bremen and Hamburg, which reject any orders; by old tradition their citizens, particularly former or present senators, will refuse any decoration in the form of an order (most famous example: former Chancellor Helmut Schmidt). Klasse (Officer’s Cross), Großes Verdienstkreuz (Halskreuz) Commander’s Cross or Grand Cross (Neck cross), Großes Verdienstkreuz mit Stern (Knight Commander’s Cross or Grand Cross with Star), Großes Verdienstkreuz mit Stern und Schulterband (Grand Cross with Star and Sash), international equivalent: Großkreuz 2. Klasse (Grand Cross of Merit, Second class) or Großkomturkreuz (Grand Commander’s Cross), Großkreuz (Grand Cross 1st class) and Sonderstufe des Großkreuzes (Grand Cross special class). The President of the Federal Republic holds the Sonderstufe des Großkreuzes ex officio. It is awarded to him in a ceremony by the President of the Bundestag attended by the Chancellor, the President of the Bundesrat and the Supreme Court President. Other than the President of the Federal Republic, only a foreign head of state can be awarded with the highest class. There is also the provision of awarding the Großkreuz in a special rare design, [1] which has so far only been used twice: for Konrad Adenauer and for Helmut Kohl. Except for the lowest class, the badge is the same for all classes, but with slightly different versions for men and women (slightly smaller badge and ribbon for women). The badge is a golden Cross enamelled in red, with a central disc bearing a black eagle. The star is a golden star with straight rays, its size and points vary according to class, with the badge superimposed upon it. The ribbon is red with gold-black-gold stripes. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Era: 1945-Present

Post WW2 New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR) Army Navy Air Force

Post WW2 New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR) Army Navy Air Force

Post WW2 New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR) Army Navy Air Force

Post WW2 New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR) Army Navy Air Force

Post WW2 New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR) Army Navy Air Force

New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR). Unnamed example in excellent condition. Toned, near mint condition. We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “Post WW2 New Zealand Meritorious Service Medal (EIIR) Army Navy Air Force” is in sale since Friday, November 19, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1939 – 1945 (WWII)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Featured Refinements: Australian WWII Collectables (1939-1945)
  • Modified Item: No
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Era: 1950s
  • Country: New Zealand

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Post Ww2 Italian Republic Order Of Merit Cased Medal Set Knight Grade Pacchiotti

Offered is an original Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, knight grade, in case of issue. 60mm high gilt-edged white enamel Greek cross with gilt ball-tipped finials, an eagle with outstretched wings between each arm, on elaborate suspension in the form of a castellated wall with three towers, green, white and red jewels at the base; the face with a five-pointed gilt star imposed centrally; the reverse identical; on original ribbon, with exact miniature medal & civilian buttonier rosette; in original fitted embossed case of issue by M. The Order was founded on 3 March 1951 to be awarded to those who render notable service to the Italian Republic and is open equally to Italian and non-Italian citizens. A very good older example. We list militaria and coins weekly. JB Military Antiques – We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “POST WW2 ITALIAN REPUBLIC ORDER OF MERIT CASED MEDAL SET KNIGHT GRADE PACCHIOTTI” is in sale since Sunday, December 20, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1939 – 1945 (WWII)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Country: Italy
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Era: 1950s

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433

Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433. Original Soviet Russian WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. DO NOT DUPLICATE OR COPY! The item “Soviet Russian USSR WW2 Screw Post Base RED STAR Silver Order Medal Badge 162433″ is in sale since Tuesday, January 7, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\Russia\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “hennadiy2006″ and is located in New Hudson, Michigan. This item can be shipped worldwide.

RAF Medals to Flt Lt’Chopper’ Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

RAF Medals to Flt Lt'Chopper' Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash

The medal group Flight Lieutenant Denys. Chopper Bryon, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Coastal Command pilot and one. Of England’s First Commercial Helicopter Pilots crashing in Wales in 1949. 1939-45 Star; Atlantic Star; Defence. And War Medals 1939-45; Air Efficiency Award, G. Beautiful toned mounted as worn. Comes with copy of research and RAF service records. Denys Huntley Bryon was born in Oct. 1920 in Hatfield, Hertfordshire and began flying in London in October 1939 with. 3 ITW, then 8FTS, S of GR and then S of GR. He was first posted to Thorny. Island in June 1940 after gaining his wings during the start of the Battle of. Britain then to 224 Squadron. 224 Squadron was a Coastal Command. Squadron that began the Second World War as a maritime reconnaissance squadron. Before becoming one of the most successful anti-submarine warfare squadrons. From 1942 until the end of the war. It then moved to its war station at. Leuchars and began to fly patrols over the North Sea looking for German ships. As well as providing convoy escorts. On 8 October a Hudson from the squadron. Reported sighting a German force consisting of a battleship, a cruiser and four. Destroyers off the south-west coast of Norway, although bad weather prevented. The sighting from being followed up. In April 1941 the. Squadron moved to Northern Ireland to fly anti-submarine patrols. Bryon was a Sergeant Pilot flying many. Patrols during his tour with the squadron with lasted from June 1940 until June. Many of these were over the Atlantic and offensive parols looking for. In January 1941 was one such operation when he and. Flt Lt Davies in their Hudson flew to Egersund, in Eigersund municipality in. Fiord with a stick of bombs. These missions were extremely dangerous if any enemy. Fighters were encountered or if the aircraft was damaged by flak. After completing his tour with 224. Squadron he was discharged to be commissioned Pilot Officer in the Royal Air. 105 OTU and other flight schools reaching the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Transportation flights for a year before being released in October 1946. Awarded the Air Efficiency Award AMO 197/46 in 1946. He is confirmed to have received. The 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence and War Medal posted thereafter, his. Bryon then trained as a Helicopter. Pilot with the British European Airways flying dragonfly helicopters. Some fame in the national press and then was involved in an accident at a Welsh. Dam which found the press, he was lucky to walk away flying a. Air Safety Committee, published 10. This was an experimental Helicopter Unit of the BEA and their. Findings were that down gusts around the landing area caused the crash. Was Denys’ 14th trip up from the valley, and the aircraft had lost power in the. Previous flight but recovered. The flight started at 12:28pm and the report. States at 200ft a “violent up-gust” followed by a down-gust on. Final approach resulted in a high rate of descent and falling rotor RPM. There is a newsreel footage of the incident on Pathe News see link. He was lucky to have survived to have. Two children, 5 grandchildren and live a long life, moving to Canada after the. War and working for the RCAF, and subsequently Supply and Services Canada. He passed away in 1990 in Ottawa. The item “RAF Medals to Flt Lt’Chopper’ Bryon WW2 Pilot and Post War Helicopter Crash” is in sale since Monday, August 30, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “itsjustamouse” and is located in Neath. This item can be shipped to United Kingdom, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Australia, United States, Bahrain, Canada, Brazil, Japan, New Zealand, China, Israel, Hong Kong, Norway, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Bolivia, Barbados, Brunei darussalam, Cayman islands, Ecuador, Egypt, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, French guiana, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Macao, Monaco, Maldives, Martinique, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, Paraguay, Reunion, Saudi arabia, South africa, United arab emirates, Ukraine, Chile, Bahamas, Colombia, Costa rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Kuwait, Panama, Philippines, Qatar, Trinidad and tobago, Uruguay, Viet nam.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Featured Refinements: RAF Medal

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

Original German Iron Cross First Class post WW2 version / 1957 pattern (no swastika), NICE CONDITION – THREE PIECE CONSTRUCTION, MAGNETIC CORE, GENUINE RARE DEUMER MADE EXAMPLE, HARD TO FIND – REALLY GOOD PIECE WITH SOME TEAR AND WEAR, THERE IS A PAINT DAMAGE ON THE UPPER ARM, ALSO THERE ARE SOME LETTERS SCRATCHED ON THE REVERSE. FEW FACTS ABOUT THE 1957 PATTERN AWARDS. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War IIera decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses , Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. Among the holders of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class was Adolf Hitler, who held the rank of Gefreiter. Hitler can be seen wearing the award on his left breast, as was standard, in many photographs. The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, the emblem of the Wehrmacht, first used in a narrower form on Luftstreitkräfte aircraft in mid-April 1918, and as shown here, as it appeared on German planes, tanks, and other vehicles during the Second World War. Adolf Hitler restored the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German decoration (rather than Prussian as in earlier versions), continuing the tradition of issuing it in various grades. Legally it is based on the enactment Reichsgesetzblatt I S. 1573 of 1 September 1939 Verordnung über die Erneuerung des Eisernen Kreuzes (Regulation for the Re-introduction of the Iron Cross). The Iron Cross of the Second World War was divided into three main series of decorations with an intermediate category, the Knight’s Cross, instituted between the lowest, the Iron Cross, and the highest, the Grand Cross. The Knight’s Cross replaced the Prussian Pour le Mérite or “Blue Max”. Hitler did not care for the Pour le Mérite, as it was a Prussian order that could be awarded only to officers. The ribbon of the medal (2nd class and Knight’s Cross) was different from the earlier Iron Crosses in that the color red was used in addition to the traditional black and white (black and white were the colours of Prussia, while black, white, and red were the colors of Germany). Hitler also created the War Merit Cross as a replacement for the non-combatant version of the Iron Cross. It also appeared on certain Nazi flags in the upper left corner. The edges were curved, like most original iron crosses. The standard 1939 Iron Cross was issued in the following two grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse abbreviated as EKI or E. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: when in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar, for everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross First Class was a pin-on medal with no ribbon and was worn centered on a uniform breast pocket, either on dress uniforms or everyday outfit. It was a progressive award, with the second class having to be earned before the first class and so on for the higher degrees. It is estimated that some four and a half million Second Class Iron Crosses were awarded in the Second World War, and 300,000 of the First Class. The item “8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER” is in sale since Wednesday, March 31, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in ST. ALBANS. This item can be shipped worldwide.