Posts tagged class

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

World War II Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of Rising Sun Medal with Box

Ww2 Imperial japanese medal. Own a significant piece of history! This World War II era Imperial Japanese 5th Class Order of the Rising Sun Medal, complete with its original box, is a treasure not to be missed. Bestowed upon those who’ve made notable achievements and contributions, this medal holds great historic and collectable value. Please note, this item has been kept in home storage, so there may be some signs of wear and tear. Refer to the photographs to ascertain the condition. The Order of the Rising Sun is one of Japan’s highest honors, with the 5th class being distinguished by the double rays and paulownia flowers. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to add such a prestigious piece to your collection! International Buyers – Please Note. Thank you for your understanding.

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

Original German War Merit Cross First Class Kriegsverdienstkreuz / post WW2 version (1957 pattern) – no swastika, VERY NICE CONDITION – WORKING PIN DEVICE, EARLY PERIOD ST&L (STEINHAUER & LUECK) MADE EXAMPLE – REALLY GOOD PIECE FROM THE 60′S (SOLID HINGE BLOCK). In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses, Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. The War Merit Cross (Kriegsverdienstkreuz) and War Merit Medal (Kriegsverdienstmedaille) was a decoration of Nazi Germany during the Second World War, which could be awarded to civilians as well as military personnel. It was reissued in 1957 by the Bundeswehr in a De-Nazified version for veterans. This award was created by Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars (same medal but with a different ribbon). The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty (but not worthy of an Iron Cross which was more a bravery award), and without swords for meritorious service behind the lines which could also be awarded to civilians. Recipients had to have the lower grade of the award before getting the next level. There was also another version below the 2nd class simply called the War Merit Medal (German: Kriegsverdienstmedaille), set up in 1940 for civilians in order to offset the large number of 2nd class without swords being awarded. It was usually given to those workers in factories who significantly exceeded work quotas. One notable winner of the War Merit Cross was William Joyce (aka Lord Haw-Haw) who received both the second and first class, both without swords. Recipients of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross customarily received the medal from holders of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, to symbolize the link between the combat soldier and their supporters, who helped maintain the war effort. There was one extra grade of the War Merit Cross, which was created at the suggestion of Albert Speer: The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold, but this was never officially placed on the list of national awards as it came about in 1945 and there was no time to officially promulgate the award before the war ended. The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold (without swords) was awarded’on paper’ to two recipients on 20 April 1945: Franz Hahne and Karl-Otto Saur. The ribbon of the War Merit Cross was in red-white-black-white-red; that was, the red and black colors being reversed from the ribbon of the World War II version of the Iron Cross. The ribbon for the War Merit Medal was similar, but with a narrow red vertical red strip in the center of the black field. Soldiers who earned the War Merit Cross 2nd Class with Swords wore a small crossed-swords device on the ribbon. The War Merit Cross 1st Class was a pin-backed medal worn on the pocket of the tunic (like the Iron Cross 1st Class). The ribbon of the War Merit Cross 2nd Class could be worn like the ribbon of the Iron Cross 2nd Class (through the third buttonhole). Combat soldiers tended to hold the War Merit Cross in low regard, referring to its wearers as being in’Iron Cross Training’, and prior to 28 September 1941, the War Merit Cross could not be worn with a corresponding grade of the Iron Cross, which took precedence. A total of 118 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross with swords, and 137 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross without swords were awarded. Considering the relative rarity of the award compared with the grades of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, it took on extra meaning. For example, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring made a concerted effort to get Hitler to award him this order, much to Hitler’s annoyance. In response, Hitler outlined a series of criteria governing the awarding of this decoration and the philosophy of such awards, and directed that “prominent party comrades” were not to be awarded with the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross (or similar decorations), and withdrew the proposed awards of this order to Gauleiter Erich Koch and State Secretary Karl Hanke. Directing his comments at Göring personally, Hitler ordered that such attempts to gain this award be stopped (from a letter dated 27 August 1943 from Führerhauptquartier). Also, the scarcity of the award of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross compared with the Kinghts Cross of the Iron Cross gave it an “air of exclusiveness” it did not really deserve, as it ranked below the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross. Six persons received two Knights Cross’ of the War Merit Cross (one with Swords and one without Swords): Walter Brugmann, Julius Dorpmuller, Karl-Otto Saur, Albin Sawatzki, Walter Schreiber, and Walter Rohlandt. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Service: Army
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons

Elizabeth II Royal Red Cross 1st Class Ladies Breast Badge 1977 Original

Elizabeth II Royal Red Cross 1st Class Ladies Breast Badge 1977 Original

Elizabeth II Royal Red Cross 1st Class Ladies Breast Badge 1977 Original

Elizabeth II Royal Red Cross 1st Class Ladies Breast Badge Dated to the Reverse 1977. These are the terms and conditions on which we supply products to you. Please read these terms carefully before you submit your order to us. These terms tell you who we are, how we will provide goods to you, what to do if there is a problem and other important information. We are International Militaria, we. Specialise in a variety of badges and medals, including: British Orders; Medals; Campaign medals; British Military and Commonwealth badges. Our Contract with you. If we are unable to accept your order, we will inform you of this and will not charge you. This might be because the product out of stock because of unexpected limits on our resources which we could not reasonably plan for or because we have identified an error in the price or description of the product. The images displayed onsite are for illustrative purposes only. Although we have made every effort to display the products accurately, we cannot guarantee that a device’s display of for example the colours accurately reflects the colour of the products. Your product may vary slightly from those images. Please note in particular that unless the product description specifically states that a product is an original issue it is a reproduction. These terms reflect the goodwill guarantee offered to our customers which is more generous than the legal rights available under the Consumer Contracts Regulations in the ways set out below. This goodwill guarantee does not affect your legal rights in relation to faulty or mis-described products which you may return within 30 days. Right under the Consumer Contracts Regulations 2013. How our goodwill guarantee is more generous. 14 day period to change your mind. 30 day period to change your mind. We pay the costs of return. Our business thrives on five star feedback from customer like you! Our aim is to provide you with great goods along with great service. We will endeavour to resolve any problems directly. How we may use your personal information. We will only use your personal information for the purposes of fulfilling our contractual commitments to you. This contract is between you and us. No other person shall have any rights to enforce any of its terms. These terms are governed by English law and you can bring legal proceedings in respect of the goods in the English courts. If you live in Scotland you can bring legal proceedings in respect of the products in either the Scottish or the English courts. If you live in Northern Ireland you can bring legal proceedings in respect of the goods in either the Northern Irish or the English courts. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “int-militaria” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1945-Present

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

Italy / Italian Republic Order Of Merit Medal Knight Class In Box

A genuine, fullsize Italy Republic Order of Merit Medal Knight Class in Box. Includes miniature medal and buttonhole rosette. Comes in Cravanzola box of issue. In good to very good condition, box has some wear. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “antiquesofwarwick” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Italy

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

8000? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

Original German War Merit Cross First Class Kriegsverdienstkreuz / post WW2 version (1957 pattern) – no swastika, VERY NICE CONDITION – WORKING PIN DEVICE, EARLY PERIOD ST&L (STEINHAUER & LUECK) MADE EXAMPLE – REALLY GOOD PIECE FROM THE 60′S (SOLID HINGE BLOCK). In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses, Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. The War Merit Cross (Kriegsverdienstkreuz) and War Merit Medal (Kriegsverdienstmedaille) was a decoration of Nazi Germany during the Second World War, which could be awarded to civilians as well as military personnel. It was reissued in 1957 by the Bundeswehr in a De-Nazified version for veterans. This award was created by Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars (same medal but with a different ribbon). The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty (but not worthy of an Iron Cross which was more a bravery award), and without swords for meritorious service behind the lines which could also be awarded to civilians. Recipients had to have the lower grade of the award before getting the next level. There was also another version below the 2nd class simply called the War Merit Medal (German: Kriegsverdienstmedaille), set up in 1940 for civilians in order to offset the large number of 2nd class without swords being awarded. It was usually given to those workers in factories who significantly exceeded work quotas. One notable winner of the War Merit Cross was William Joyce (aka Lord Haw-Haw) who received both the second and first class, both without swords. Recipients of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross customarily received the medal from holders of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, to symbolize the link between the combat soldier and their supporters, who helped maintain the war effort. There was one extra grade of the War Merit Cross, which was created at the suggestion of Albert Speer: The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold, but this was never officially placed on the list of national awards as it came about in 1945 and there was no time to officially promulgate the award before the war ended. The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold (without swords) was awarded’on paper’ to two recipients on 20 April 1945: Franz Hahne and Karl-Otto Saur. The ribbon of the War Merit Cross was in red-white-black-white-red; that was, the red and black colors being reversed from the ribbon of the World War II version of the Iron Cross. The ribbon for the War Merit Medal was similar, but with a narrow red vertical red strip in the center of the black field. Soldiers who earned the War Merit Cross 2nd Class with Swords wore a small crossed-swords device on the ribbon. The War Merit Cross 1st Class was a pin-backed medal worn on the pocket of the tunic (like the Iron Cross 1st Class). The ribbon of the War Merit Cross 2nd Class could be worn like the ribbon of the Iron Cross 2nd Class (through the third buttonhole). Combat soldiers tended to hold the War Merit Cross in low regard, referring to its wearers as being in’Iron Cross Training’, and prior to 28 September 1941, the War Merit Cross could not be worn with a corresponding grade of the Iron Cross, which took precedence. A total of 118 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross with swords, and 137 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross without swords were awarded. Considering the relative rarity of the award compared with the grades of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, it took on extra meaning. For example, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring made a concerted effort to get Hitler to award him this order, much to Hitler’s annoyance. In response, Hitler outlined a series of criteria governing the awarding of this decoration and the philosophy of such awards, and directed that “prominent party comrades” were not to be awarded with the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross (or similar decorations), and withdrew the proposed awards of this order to Gauleiter Erich Koch and State Secretary Karl Hanke. Directing his comments at Göring personally, Hitler ordered that such attempts to gain this award be stopped (from a letter dated 27 August 1943 from Führerhauptquartier). Also, the scarcity of the award of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross compared with the Kinghts Cross of the Iron Cross gave it an “air of exclusiveness” it did not really deserve, as it ranked below the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross. Six persons received two Knights Cross’ of the War Merit Cross (one with Swords and one without Swords): Walter Brugmann, Julius Dorpmuller, Karl-Otto Saur, Albin Sawatzki, Walter Schreiber, and Walter Rohlandt. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Service: Army
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

Original German post WW2 made WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class (Militärverdienstkreuz) , IN VERY NICE CONDITION – POST WW2 MADE EXAMPLE / MAKER: ST&L (STEINHAUER UND LUECK) – GOOD EARLY EXAMPLE WITH SOLID HINGE BLOCK, PERFECTLY WORKING PIN DEVICE, HARD TO FIND – REALLY GOOD AND RARE PIECE. FEW FACTS ABOUT POST WW2 MADE IMPERIAL GERMAN & FOREIGN AWARDS. After WW2 wear and display of former Nazi decorations were strictly prohibited in Germany. As Germany split apart into East and West Germany, each of these new countries issued directives concerning the status of former awards and decorations of Nazi Germany. Within East Germany, these awards were all abolished with a new era of German Communist decorations created to take their place. However, in West Germany, pre 1933 issued awards were fully accepted to wear & display, therefore these awards (including foreign awards) were continuously produced after the end of the war by major manufacturers, such as Steinhauer & Lück, Deumer or Souval. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross (Militärverdienstkreuz) was established by Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin on August 5, 1848. Mecklenburg-Schwerin, a grand duchy located in northern Germany, was a member of the German Confederation and later the German Empire. In several respects, Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s Military Merit Cross was patterned after the Prussian Iron Cross. Both came in two classes, a pinback 1st Class and a 2nd Class worn from a ribbon, both were awarded without regard to rank (most other orders and medals of both states were awarded in different classes based on the rank or status of the recipient), and both were awarded for specific campaigns, as indicated by a date on the bottom arm of the cross. However, there were more versions of the Mecklenburg cross than of the Prussian cross (which was only awarded by Prussia in the Napoleonic Wars, the Franco-Prussian War and World War I, and by Germany in World War II). The first versions were dated 1848 and 1849, and awarded for merit in the First War of Schleswig and in the suppression of the German Revolution of 1848-49 (some Mecklenburg troops were sent to Baden in 1849 while others remained in the fighting in Schleswig). In 1859, some Mecklenburg observers and Austrian officers were decorated for merit during the Second Italian War of Independence. The next version was dated 1864, and recognized merit in the Second War of Schleswig, also called the German-Danish War. Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s participation on the side of Prussia and other north German states in the Austro-Prussian War led to the next version, dated 1866. An 1870 version was created for the Franco-Prussian War, where Mecklenburg troops fought as part of the 17. In this war, a number of officers and soldiers received both the Iron Cross and the Mecklenburg-Schwerin Military Merit Cross. The next version was dated 1877. Certain German states, especially Mecklenburg-Schwerin, were sympathetic to the Russian and Romanian cause, and had dynastic connections to both states. Grand Duke Friedrich Franz II’s grandmother was Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia, his daughter was married to Tsar Alexander II of Russia’s son, and his son and heir, Friedrich Franz III, would marry Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia in 1879. The Romanian royal family was a branch of the Hohenzollerns, the ruling house of Prussia and the newly created German Empire. A version dated 1900 was struck for Mecklenburgers who had distinguished themselves in the Boxer Rebellion of 1900-01. An undated version was then created, which was awarded for merit in various colonial conflicts of the first decade of the 20th century, including the Herero Wars (a series of brutal conflicts where some Germans displayed great bravery in fighting guerrillas from the Herero and other tribes, while other Germans perpetrated what has come to be seen as the genocide of the Herero people). Germany entered World War I in the first days of August 1914. On February 28, 1915, Friedrich Franz IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, reauthorized the Military Merit Cross. The new version was dated 1914 and awards were made retroactively to the beginning of the war. Both classes of the Military Merit Cross continued to be awarded throughout the war, both to Mecklenburgers and to soldiers of other German states and German allies. Upon Friedrich Franz IV’s abdication in November 14, 1918, the Military Merit Cross became obsolete. It continued to be permitted for wear by those who had received it through the Weimar era, the Third Reich and in West Germany (it is unclear whether East Germany permitted the wear of any Imperial German decorations). In all its versions, the Mecklenburg-Schwerin Military Merit Cross was a bronze gilt cross pattée ins design, similar to the Iron Cross but with slightly narrower arms. The obverse bore a crown on the upper arm, the initials of Friedrich Franz in the center, and the date (except for the colonial version) at the bottom of the lower arm. The reverse of the 2nd Class bore the legend “Für Auszeichnung im Kriege” (“For distinction in the war”). The reverse of the 1st Class, a pinback cross (Steckkreuz), was blank. The ribbon was light blue with narrow edge stripes of yellow and red (with the red stripes on the outside). For awards to non-combatants, the same cross was worn, but the ribbon was changed to red with light blue and yellow edge stripes. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Navy
  • Era: 1914-1945

Finland / Finnish 1939 Mourning Liberty Cross Medal 4th Class With Swords (a)

Finland / Finnish 1939 Mourning Liberty Cross Medal 4th Class With Swords (a)

Finland / Finnish 1939 Mourning Liberty Cross Medal 4th Class With Swords (a)

Finland / Finnish 1939 Mourning Liberty Cross Medal 4th Class With Swords (a)

Finland / Finnish 1939 Mourning Liberty Cross Medal 4th Class With Swords (a)

A genuine, fullsize WW2 Finland 1939 Mourning Liberty Cross 4th Class with Swords and Black Ribbon. In average to good condition, with wear. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “antiquesofwarwick” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Finland
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Era: 1914-1945

Cased 1914 Iron Cross 2nd class, 3 part made with iron core, made in WW2

Cased 1914 Iron Cross 2nd class, 3 part made with iron core, made in WW2

Cased 1914 Iron Cross 2nd class, 3 part made with iron core, made in WW2

Cased 1914 Iron Cross 2nd class, 3 part made with iron core, made in WW2

Cased 1914 Iron Cross 2nd class, 3 part made with iron core, made in WW2

1914 Iron Cross 2nd class, 3 part made with iron core. Weight 15.4 gms, width 44.2mm. Supplied in period burgundy card case with cut out for cross and ribbon. Please see my other medals for sale. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “rittervonholz” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped to United Kingdom, Antigua and Barbuda, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Republic of Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Australia, United States, Bahrain, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, China, Israel, Hong Kong, Norway, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Bangladesh, Belize, Bermuda, Bolivia, Barbados, Brunei Darussalam, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Egypt, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Grenada, French Guiana, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Macau, Monaco, Maldives, Montserrat, Martinique, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Turks and Caicos Islands, Aruba, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, Chile, Bahamas, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Kuwait, Panama, Qatar, El Salvador, Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Modified Item: No

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

10733? German WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class post WW2 made

Original German post WW2 made WW1 Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross First Class (Militärverdienstkreuz) , IN VERY NICE CONDITION – POST WW2 MADE EXAMPLE / MAKER: ST&L (STEINHAUER UND LUECK) – GOOD EARLY EXAMPLE WITH SOLID HINGE BLOCK, PERFECTLY WORKING PIN DEVICE, HARD TO FIND – REALLY GOOD AND RARE PIECE. FEW FACTS ABOUT POST WW2 MADE IMPERIAL GERMAN & FOREIGN AWARDS. After WW2 wear and display of former Nazi decorations were strictly prohibited in Germany. As Germany split apart into East and West Germany, each of these new countries issued directives concerning the status of former awards and decorations of Nazi Germany. Within East Germany, these awards were all abolished with a new era of German Communist decorations created to take their place. However, in West Germany, pre 1933 issued awards were fully accepted to wear & display, therefore these awards (including foreign awards) were continuously produced after the end of the war by major manufacturers, such as Steinhauer & Lück, Deumer or Souval. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Mecklenburg Military Merit Cross (Militärverdienstkreuz) was established by Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin on August 5, 1848. Mecklenburg-Schwerin, a grand duchy located in northern Germany, was a member of the German Confederation and later the German Empire. In several respects, Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s Military Merit Cross was patterned after the Prussian Iron Cross. Both came in two classes, a pinback 1st Class and a 2nd Class worn from a ribbon, both were awarded without regard to rank (most other orders and medals of both states were awarded in different classes based on the rank or status of the recipient), and both were awarded for specific campaigns, as indicated by a date on the bottom arm of the cross. However, there were more versions of the Mecklenburg cross than of the Prussian cross (which was only awarded by Prussia in the Napoleonic Wars, the Franco-Prussian War and World War I, and by Germany in World War II). The first versions were dated 1848 and 1849, and awarded for merit in the First War of Schleswig and in the suppression of the German Revolution of 1848-49 (some Mecklenburg troops were sent to Baden in 1849 while others remained in the fighting in Schleswig). In 1859, some Mecklenburg observers and Austrian officers were decorated for merit during the Second Italian War of Independence. The next version was dated 1864, and recognized merit in the Second War of Schleswig, also called the German-Danish War. Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s participation on the side of Prussia and other north German states in the Austro-Prussian War led to the next version, dated 1866. An 1870 version was created for the Franco-Prussian War, where Mecklenburg troops fought as part of the 17. In this war, a number of officers and soldiers received both the Iron Cross and the Mecklenburg-Schwerin Military Merit Cross. The next version was dated 1877. Certain German states, especially Mecklenburg-Schwerin, were sympathetic to the Russian and Romanian cause, and had dynastic connections to both states. Grand Duke Friedrich Franz II’s grandmother was Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia, his daughter was married to Tsar Alexander II of Russia’s son, and his son and heir, Friedrich Franz III, would marry Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia in 1879. The Romanian royal family was a branch of the Hohenzollerns, the ruling house of Prussia and the newly created German Empire. A version dated 1900 was struck for Mecklenburgers who had distinguished themselves in the Boxer Rebellion of 1900-01. An undated version was then created, which was awarded for merit in various colonial conflicts of the first decade of the 20th century, including the Herero Wars (a series of brutal conflicts where some Germans displayed great bravery in fighting guerrillas from the Herero and other tribes, while other Germans perpetrated what has come to be seen as the genocide of the Herero people). Germany entered World War I in the first days of August 1914. On February 28, 1915, Friedrich Franz IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, reauthorized the Military Merit Cross. The new version was dated 1914 and awards were made retroactively to the beginning of the war. Both classes of the Military Merit Cross continued to be awarded throughout the war, both to Mecklenburgers and to soldiers of other German states and German allies. Upon Friedrich Franz IV’s abdication in November 14, 1918, the Military Merit Cross became obsolete. It continued to be permitted for wear by those who had received it through the Weimar era, the Third Reich and in West Germany (it is unclear whether East Germany permitted the wear of any Imperial German decorations). In all its versions, the Mecklenburg-Schwerin Military Merit Cross was a bronze gilt cross pattée ins design, similar to the Iron Cross but with slightly narrower arms. The obverse bore a crown on the upper arm, the initials of Friedrich Franz in the center, and the date (except for the colonial version) at the bottom of the lower arm. The reverse of the 2nd Class bore the legend “Für Auszeichnung im Kriege” (“For distinction in the war”). The reverse of the 1st Class, a pinback cross (Steckkreuz), was blank. The ribbon was light blue with narrow edge stripes of yellow and red (with the red stripes on the outside). For awards to non-combatants, the same cross was worn, but the ribbon was changed to red with light blue and yellow edge stripes. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Navy
  • Era: 1914-1945

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

9725? German Army War Merit Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern ST&L

Original German War Merit Cross First Class Kriegsverdienstkreuz / post WW2 version (1957 pattern) – no swastika, IN VERY NICE CONDITION WITH PERFECT PIN DEVICE, LATER ST&L (STEINHAUER & LUECK) MADE EXAMPLE WITH OPEN HINGEBLOCK, A REALLY GOOD PIECE. FEW FACTS ABOUT THE GERMAN 1957 PATTERN AWARDS. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War II-era decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses, Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. The War Merit Cross (Kriegsverdienstkreuz) and War Merit Medal (Kriegsverdienstmedaille) was a decoration of Nazi Germany during the Second World War, which could be awarded to civilians as well as military personnel. It was reissued in 1957 by the Bundeswehr in a De-Nazified version for veterans. This award was created by Adolf Hitler in 1939 as a successor to the non-combatant Iron Cross which was used in earlier wars (same medal but with a different ribbon). The award was graded the same as the Iron Cross: War Merit Cross Second Class, War Merit Cross First Class, and Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross. The award had two variants: with swords given to soldiers for exceptional service in battle above and beyond the call of duty (but not worthy of an Iron Cross which was more a bravery award), and without swords for meritorious service behind the lines which could also be awarded to civilians. Recipients had to have the lower grade of the award before getting the next level. There was also another version below the 2nd class simply called the War Merit Medal (German: Kriegsverdienstmedaille), set up in 1940 for civilians in order to offset the large number of 2nd class without swords being awarded. It was usually given to those workers in factories who significantly exceeded work quotas. One notable winner of the War Merit Cross was William Joyce (aka Lord Haw-Haw) who received both the second and first class, both without swords. Recipients of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross customarily received the medal from holders of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, to symbolize the link between the combat soldier and their supporters, who helped maintain the war effort. There was one extra grade of the War Merit Cross, which was created at the suggestion of Albert Speer: The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold, but this was never officially placed on the list of national awards as it came about in 1945 and there was no time to officially promulgate the award before the war ended. The Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross in Gold (without swords) was awarded’on paper’ to two recipients on 20 April 1945: Franz Hahne and Karl-Otto Saur. The ribbon of the War Merit Cross was in red-white-black-white-red; that was, the red and black colors being reversed from the ribbon of the World War II version of the Iron Cross. The ribbon for the War Merit Medal was similar, but with a narrow red vertical red strip in the center of the black field. Soldiers who earned the War Merit Cross 2nd Class with Swords wore a small crossed-swords device on the ribbon. The War Merit Cross 1st Class was a pin-backed medal worn on the pocket of the tunic (like the Iron Cross 1st Class). The ribbon of the War Merit Cross 2nd Class could be worn like the ribbon of the Iron Cross 2nd Class (through the third buttonhole). Combat soldiers tended to hold the War Merit Cross in low regard, referring to its wearers as being in’Iron Cross Training’, and prior to 28 September 1941, the War Merit Cross could not be worn with a corresponding grade of the Iron Cross, which took precedence. A total of 118 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross with swords, and 137 awards of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross without swords were awarded. Considering the relative rarity of the award compared with the grades of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, it took on extra meaning. For example, Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring made a concerted effort to get Hitler to award him this order, much to Hitler’s annoyance. In response, Hitler outlined a series of criteria governing the awarding of this decoration and the philosophy of such awards, and directed that “prominent party comrades” were not to be awarded with the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross (or similar decorations), and withdrew the proposed awards of this order to Gauleiter Erich Koch and State Secretary Karl Hanke. Directing his comments at Göring personally, Hitler ordered that such attempts to gain this award be stopped (from a letter dated 27 August 1943 from Führerhauptquartier). Also, the scarcity of the award of the Knights Cross of the War Merit Cross compared with the Kinghts Cross of the Iron Cross gave it an “air of exclusiveness” it did not really deserve, as it ranked below the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross. Six persons received two Knights Cross’ of the War Merit Cross (one with Swords and one without Swords): Walter Brugmann, Julius Dorpmuller, Karl-Otto Saur, Albin Sawatzki, Walter Schreiber, and Walter Rohlandt. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Service: Army
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons