Posts tagged mounted

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA

Original German mounted medal group. Class, Anhalt Friedrich Cross II. Class (non combatant ribbon) & Oldenburg FA Cross II. Class – WW1, NICE WORN CONDITION, GENUINE RIBBONS, PERFECT PIN DEVICE, the Iron Cross is a three piece construction example with magnetic core – the Anhalt Friedrich Cross II. Class on non combatant ribbon is very rare, only 800 were awarded. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. The Cross was created by Duke Friedrich II on 12 December 1914 for officers, military officials, non-commissioned officers and other ranks, as well as other persons, without regard for rank or status, who showed particular excellence in the theatre of war or exemplary conduct on the home front in support of the war (für Offiziere, Militärbeamte, Unteroffiziere und Mannschaften sowie für sonstige Personen ohne Unterscheid des Ranges und Standes, die sich auf dem Kriegsschauplatz besonders ausgezeichnet oder während des Krieges im Heimatsgebiet hervorragend betätigt haben). The Cross was suppressed at the end of 1918. The population of the Duchy of Anhalt was less than 350,000 at the time of World War I and its decorations are amongst those found less often. The cross has a magnetic core and is thus an early issue (later awards were in zinc alloy Kriegsmetall). The Cross was instituted on 24 September 1914 for all ranks and was the Grand Duchys equivalent of the Prussian Iron Cross for bravery in the field. The item “7294 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross Anhalt Friedrich Oldenburg FA” is in sale since Friday, April 20, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in Abbots Langley. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Country/ Organization: Germany

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

Ww1 Medal Trio, Meritorious Service Medal Set Military Mounted Police

WW1 trio and Meritorious service medal set. WW1 trio named: P. Meritorious service named: P-1845. This item is for a military mounted police medal set as described above. Any questions please ask. SEE ALL MY ANTIQUES AND COLLECTABLES. The item “WW1 MEDAL TRIO, MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL SET MILITARY MOUNTED POLICE” is in sale since Sunday, May 5, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “hytheantiques2011″ and is located in ashford, Kent. This item can be shipped worldwide.

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER

Original German Parade Mounted medal bar post WW2 version – 1957 PATTERN – no swastika: Iron Cross II. Class & Eastern Front Medal, VERY NICE CONDITION – THE IRON CROSS IS A THREE PIECE CONSTRUCTION EXAMPLE WITH MAGNETIC CORE, GENUINE RARE DEUMER MADE GOOD EXAMPLES, PERFECTLY WORKING PIN DEVICE. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War IIera decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses , Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARDS. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. Among the holders of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class was Adolf Hitler, who held the rank of Gefreiter. Hitler can be seen wearing the award on his left breast, as was standard, in many photographs. The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, the emblem of the Wehrmacht, first used in a narrower form on Luftstreitkräfte aircraft in mid-April 1918, and as shown here, as it appeared on German planes, tanks, and other vehicles during the Second World War. Adolf Hitler restored the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German decoration (rather than Prussian as in earlier versions), continuing the tradition of issuing it in various grades. Legally it is based on the enactment Reichsgesetzblatt I S. 1573 of 1 September 1939 Verordnung über die Erneuerung des Eisernen Kreuzes (Regulation for the Re-introduction of the Iron Cross). The Iron Cross of the Second World War was divided into three main series of decorations with an intermediate category, the Knight’s Cross, instituted between the lowest, the Iron Cross, and the highest, the Grand Cross. The Knight’s Cross replaced the Prussian Pour le Mérite or “Blue Max”. Hitler did not care for the Pour le Mérite, as it was a Prussian order that could be awarded only to officers. The ribbon of the medal (2nd class and Knight’s Cross) was different from the earlier Iron Crosses in that the color red was used in addition to the traditional black and white (black and white were the colours of Prussia, while black, white, and red were the colors of Germany). Hitler also created the War Merit Cross as a replacement for the non-combatant version of the Iron Cross. It also appeared on certain Nazi flags in the upper left corner. The edges were curved, like most original iron crosses. The standard 1939 Iron Cross was issued in the following two grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse abbreviated as EKI or E. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: when in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar, for everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross First Class was a pin-on medal with no ribbon and was worn centered on a uniform breast pocket, either on dress uniforms or everyday outfit. It was a progressive award, with the second class having to be earned before the first class and so on for the higher degrees. It is estimated that some four and a half million Second Class Iron Crosses were awarded in the Second World War, and 300,000 of the First Class. The Eastern Front Medal, (Winterschlacht Im Osten), more commonly known as the Ostmedaille was instituted on May 26, 1942 to mark service on the German Eastern Front (World War II) during the period November 15, 1941 to April 15, 1942. It was commissioned to recognise the hardship endured by German and Axis Powers personnel, combatant or non-combatant, during the especially bitter Russian winter of’41/’42. It was wryly called the “Gefrierfleischorden” (Frozen Meat Medal) by the Heer, Luftwaffe & Waffen-SS personnel to whom it was awarded. Qualification for the award: 14 days served in active combat within the specified area between November 15, 1941 April 15, 1942, 60 days served in specified area between November 15, 1941 April 15, 1942, non-combat, wounded in action, killed in action (posthumous award) or injury caused by frostbite (or another injury related to the climate) severe enough to warrant the issue of a Wound Badge. Unique in that its designer was a contemporary serving soldier, SS-Unterscharführer Ernst Krause, the medal was held in high regard by all branches of the Wehrmacht. Measuring 36mm in diameter, of (generally) zinc construction, the medal was given a gun-metal coloured coating. On one side an eagle grasps a Swastika and the reverse features the text “Winterschlacht Im Osten 1941/42″ featuring a crossed sword and branch below the text. The helmet and outer ring were finished in a polished silver effect. A ribbon that accompanied the medal was coloured red, white and black (symbolic of blood, snow and death). The medal and ribbon were usually presented in a paper packet, but these were invariably discarded. Over 3 million were made by more than 26 confirmed firms by the time the order was officially decommissioned by Oberkommando der Wehrmacht on September 4, 1944. The medal itself was not worn on the combat tunic as per the 1st class Iron Cross & War Merit Cross for example, but worn as a ribbon bar, or as the ribbon alone stitched through the second from top tunic buttonhole as per 2nd Class Iron Cross and War Merit Cross. The item “8174 German mounted medals post WW2 1957 pattern Iron Cross Ostmedaille DEUMER” is in sale since Saturday, January 5, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in Abbots Langley. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany

Ww1 Australian British Commonwealth Mounted Medal Trio Group Replica Anzac

Ww1 Australian British Commonwealth Mounted Medal Trio Group Replica Anzac

Ww1 Australian British Commonwealth Mounted Medal Trio Group Replica Anzac

Offered is a Full sized Replica set of medals, for First World War service. Medals include the following awards: 1914/15 Star, War Medal & Victory Medal. Court mounted for wear or display. Comes with a 5 year guarantee of wokmanship. These are quality die cast alloy replicas, made with a toned appearance which atones with the’originals’ 100 years of age, thus not being shiny and flashy in appearance. These can be worn on special military anniversaries, including Anzac and Remembrance Day. This trio is the standard three medals awarded for those soldiers, sailor’s and airmen who served during the First World War who entered combat from 1915 – 1918. These are most associated with those who served at Gallipoli. The 191415 Star was approved in 1918, for issue to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who served in any theatre of the War between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915 (other than those who had already qualified for the 1914 Star). The British war Medal was approved in 1919, for issue to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who had rendered service between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918. Officers and men of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, and Dominion and Colonial naval forces (including reserves) were required to have completed 28 days mobilised service the medal was automatically awarded in the event of death on active service before the completion of this period. The medal was later extended to cover the period 191920 and service in mine-clearing at sea as well as participation in operations in North and South Russia, the eastern Baltic, Siberia, the Black Sea, and the Caspian. The Victory Medal (also called the Inter-Allied Victory Medal) is a campaign medal – of which the basic design and ribbon was adopted by Belgium, Brazil, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Romania, Siam, Union of South Africa and the USA in accordance with decisions as taken at the Inter-Allied Peace Conference at Versailles as illustrated (a’Winged Victory) but in a particular form of this historic Greek monument as determined by each nation, with the exception of the nations in the Far East who issued the medal but with a different design. The dates of the war were in every case 1914 to 1918, except that of the British Empire, which gave the dates as illustrated (1914 to 1919 with 1921 being the year in which the war ended in point of Parliamentary law but in 1919 under common law relating to the status and functions of the monarchy). We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. 2/135 Russell St, Morley, WA. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “WW1 AUSTRALIAN BRITISH COMMONWEALTH MOUNTED MEDAL TRIO GROUP REPLICA ANZAC” is in sale since Friday, September 9, 2016. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country: AUSTRALIA
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Authenticity: Reproduction
  • Campaign: WW1

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop

Original Austro-Hungarian Empire / Hungary Kingdom mounted medal group – WW1 / WW2: Hungarian National Defence Cross, Hungarian War Commemorative Medal Without Swords & Helmet. Hungarian War Commemorative Medal for Liberation of Transylvania, Hungarian War Commemorative Medal for Liberation of Upper Hungary, Hungarian War Commemorative Medal for Liberation of Southern Hungary. Austrian War Commemorative Medal. Bulgarian War Commemorative Medal. VERY NICE WORN CONDITION, BEAUTIFUL GROUP, PERFECT PIN DEVICE, ALL RIBBON ARE GENUINE, THE WW1 MEDALS’ RIBBONS LOOK MORE WORN BUT STILL OK. HISTORY OF THE AWARDS. National Defence Cross (Nemzetvédelmi Kereszt), 1940 – Silvered metal cross pattée, the arms stippled, with laterally-pierced ball suspension; the face with the arms of Hungary imposed centrally; the reverse with a central escutcheon inscribed A HAZÁÉRT (for the Homeland) and dated 1940′. The Cross was instituted 11 December 1940 with the intention initially of rewarding those who had resisted and defeated the Communist regime of Bela Kun in 1919 and latterly those who loyally served the Regent of Hungary and fought subversive elements during World War II. Hungarian Commemorative Medal of the World War – Awarded “with helmet and swords” to soldiers and other combattants or “without helmet and swords” to all other war participants or to the nearest relative of a soldier. This medal was instituted on 26 May 1929 by the Regent, Admiral Horthy. The obverse shows the weapon shield of Hungary surmounted by a crown and, if so awarded, with swords underneath the shield. In case of the award “without helmet and swords”, the ribbon is white with green-red-white side stripes. Commemorative Medal for the Liberation of Transylvania (Erdélyi Emlékérem), 1940 Circular medal in Kriegsmetall (zinc alloy) with laterally-pierced loop for ribbon suspension; the face with the head of King Mátyás Corvinus circumscribed ERDÉLYI RÉSZEK FELSZABADULÁSÁNAK EMLÉKÉRE (Medal for the Liberation of Part of Transylvania); the reverse with the arms of Transylvania circumscribed MÁTYÁS KIRÁLY SZÜLETÉSÉNEK 500 ÉVFORDULÓJÁN (King Mátyás 500th Anniversary of his Birthright) and inscribed around the rim VITÉZ NAGYBÁNYAI HORTHY MIKLÓS KORMÁNYZÓ ORSZÁGLÁSÁNAK XX ÉVÉBEN (In the 20th Year of the Regency of Valiant Miklós Horthy de Nagybányai). The medal was instituted on 1 October 1940 to mark the return of part of Transylvania to Hungary. At the end of World War I, Hungary lost almost three-quarters of its territory, amongst them many areas with large Hungarian populations, including Transylvania. In mid-1940, with Romania under pressure from the Soviet Union and Bulgaria, Hungary lodged a claim to Transylvania. Germany and Italy led arbitration at Vienna and on 30 August Romania ceded approximately 43,500 square kilometres of territory and almost 2,400,000 people in northwest Transylvania to Hungary. In 1479 to 1483 he retook Transylvania from the Ottoman Turks and is revered in Hungary as a national hero. Commemorative Medal for the Liberation of Upper Hungary (Felvidéki Emlékérem), 1938 Circular bronze medal with laterally-pierced loop for ribbon suspension; the face with the head and shoulders portrait of Francis II Rákóczi in armour facing right, circumscribed PRO PATRIA ET LIBERTATE RÁKÓCZI (For Fatherland and Liberty Rákóczi); the reverse inscribed A MAGYAR FELVIDÉK FELSZABADULÁSÁNAK EMLÉKÉRE (Medal for the Liberation of Upper Hungary). The medal was instituted on 4 November 1938. At the end of World War I, Hungary lost almost three-quarters of its territory, amongst them many areas with large Hungarian populations, including areas of southern Slovakia and southern Carpathian Rus. The Munich Agreement between Germany, Britain, France and Italy dealt not only with the question of the Sudeten Germans but also called for a settlement of Hungarian claims on this Czechoslovak territory. German and Italian arbitration in Vienna led to an imposed settlement on 2 November 1938 by which almost 12,000 square kilometres of territory and over a million people were transferred to Hungary. The award was annulled after World War II and the territory divided between Slovakia and the Ukraine. He is revered in Hungary as a national hero. Commemorative Medal for the Liberation of Southern Hungary (Délvidéki Emlékérem), 1941 Circular medal in Kriegsmetall (zinc alloy) with laterally-pierced loop for ribbon suspension; the face with John Hunyadi circumscribed MAGYAR DÉLVIDÉK VISSZAFOGLALÁSA EMLÉKÉRE (Medal for the Reoccupation of Southern Hungary); the reverse with the arms of Southern Hungary circumscribed VITÉZ NAGYBÁNYAI HORTHY MIKLÓS KORMÁNYZÓSÁGÁNAK XXII ÉVÉBEN (In the 22nd Year of the Regency of Valiant Miklós Horthy de Nagybányai). The medal was instituted on 11 April 1941 to mark the return of Southern Hungary to Hungary. At the end of World War I, Hungary lost almost three-quarters of its territory, amongst them many areas with large Hungarian populations, including Southern Hungary. Karl Troop Cross (Karl Truppenkreuz) was instituted on 13 December 1916 by Emperor Karl I of Austria-Hungary. The cross was awarded until the end of the First World War to soldiers of the Austro-Hungarian Army , regardless of rank, who had been with a combatant unit for at least twelve weeks and who had actually served at the front. The medal is of zinc and consists of a cross pattée resting on a laurel wreath. The reverse shows the Austrian and Hungarian Imperial crowns above the letter “C” (for Carolus) with the inscription “VITEM ET SANGVINEM”, (With life and blood) and the date MDCCCCXVI, (1916). The cross was worn on the left chest from a red ribbon with alternate red-white side strips towards each edge. A total of 651,000 were awarded. Austrian War Commemorative Medal (Kriegserinnerungsmedaille) Awarded to all who served in the First World War. This medal was instituted on 21 december 1932 and on 10 November 1933 gilt crossed swords were decreed. These were to be attached to the medal’s ribbon for those who served under fire at the front, wounded and POW who had behaved with honour. The obverse depicts an eagle with wings opened downwards, standing on an upright shield with the Austrian weapon. Along the lower rim are the words “FÜR ÖSTERREICH” (For Austria). The medal is 3.6mm thick and thus of Swiss manufacture. The medal was created by decree on 9 December 1933 and awarded to all participants then living in World War I, both military and civilian, until 31 December 1939. The medal could be awarded to military from the Central Powers and to foreign citizens; in the event the largest such group was German military. Bulgaria felt a great sense of grievance following the loss of territory at the conclusion of the second Balkan War in 1913. When Germany offered to restore all of the lands she had been promised in 1878, Bulgaria, which had the largest army in the Balkans, declared war on Serbia in October 1915. In return, Britain, France and Italy then declared war on Bulgaria. After initial victories, the war became unpopular because of food and other shortages and the revolution in Russia in 1917 had a profound effect on Bulgarian sentiment. When the Allies finally broke out of the Salonika pocket, Bulgaria sued for peace and King Ferdinand I abdicated in favour of his son who became King Boris III. The Treaty of Neuilly that concluded the war took significant territory from Bulgaria and imposed severe restrictions on the future size of her armed forces. The item “7722 Austro-Hungarian mounted medal group WW1 WW2 Defence Cross Karl Troop” is in sale since Thursday, April 12, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in Abbots Langley. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Country/ Organization: Germany

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals

Original German mounted medal group: Iron Cross II. Class, Bavarian Army Jubilee Medal, Honour Cross With Swords, China Campaign Medal for Combatants with two clasps: “FOUPHING” & “HUOLU”, Prussian Long Service Cross for Officers for 25 Years’, Prussian Centenary Medal. Commemorative Cross of the. Austrian Legion of Honour & Bavarian. Long Service Cross for Officers for 25 Years. WW1, VERY NICE CONDITION. GENUINE RIBBONS , THERE IS NO PIN DEVICE AT THE BACK, the Iron Cross is a three piece construction example with magnetic core, the Honour Cross is magnetic, maker: “KM & F”, NICE RARE GROUP – HARD TO FIND. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. The medal was awarded on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of his entry into the Bavarian Army by Prince Regent Luitpold. It was awarded to serving officers, non-commissioned officers and military officials (Militärbeamten), to officers of the Reserve and Territorial Army (Landwehr) and to holders of the Gold and Silver Military Merit Medal. In all, just over twenty-two thousand medals were struck at the Bavarian Mint and the medal is thus quite hard-to-find. Cross of Honor, a. Hindenburgkreuz, Frontkämpferehrenkreuz (Ehrenkreuz des Weltkrieges 1914/1918) – Ehrenkreuz des Weltkrieges 1914/1918 was instituted on July 13, 1934 by the President Generalfeldmarshall Paul von Hindenburg aiming to commemorate all those who fought and fell during the Great War and therefore was nicknamed Hindenburg Cross. Cross of Honor was awarded to frontline veterans and non-combatants German citizens and Germans who lost their citizenship due to the Versailles Peace Treaty as well as to relatives of the fallen soldiers their widows and parents. Thus it aim was to reinforce pride not only in veterans but also military personnel of German Armed forces. Cross of Honor was instituted in three classes: 1. Cross of Honor for frontline soldiers (Ehrenkreuz für Frontkämpfer). It was awarded only for the military personnel of the Imperial Army and Navy who had engaged the enemy in frontline combat. Cross of Honor for war participants, i. Non-combatants (Ehrenkreuz für Kriegsteilnehmer). It was awarded to military auxiliary personnel such as administrators and medics, as well as to civilians state officials, etc. Cross of Honor for next-of-kin (Ehrenkreuz für Hinterbliebene). It was issued to widows and parents of those who were killed or died during WWI or were missing in action. Award was issued after an application accompanied by a prove of wartime service or loss of a relative was approved by the authorities, the Reichsminister of interior being in charge of the distribution of crosses. Cross of Honor was handed personally to the active military personnel and sent by post to veterans and civilians. Ehrenkreuz des Weltkrieges was created by Eugene Godet who received commission from the Reich Chancellery and its design was based on that of the Prussian Kriegsdenkmünze für die Feldzüge 1870/1871 Kriegsdenkmünze für die Feldzüge 1870/1871 reverse. It had a form of an equilateral 37×37 mm Teutonic cross with a 1 mm raised edge line and a recessed field. Two dates referring to the Great War were placed over each other in the central medallion 1914 and 1918. The upper arm of the cross had a 1,5-2 mm ribbon ring through which a ribbon loop ran. Three classes of the Honor Cross differed by the following details. Cross of Honor for frontline soldiers made of bronze or bronzed iron had a wreath of laurels on the center, tied at the base by a ribbon tie with the ends extending to the lower arm of the cross. The wreath was composed of five bunches of three leaves on each side, with a pair of laurel berries at each joint. A pair of 41 mm crossed swords were placed through the arms of the cross. Tricolor 25-30 mm ribbon featured central red stripe and black and white stripes on both sides accompanied by thin black stripes closer to both edges. Sometimes a crossed swords gilt device was worn on the ribbon. Cross of Honor for war participants made of bronze or bronzed iron was of a nearly similar design but had a wreath of oak leaves and lacked swords. Its ribbon was similar to that of the Cross of Honor for frontline soldiers. Cross of Honor for next-of-kin was similar to the Cross of Honor for war participants but was finished in black and its ribbon colors were inverted, i. Central red stripe and white and black stripes on both sides accompanied by thin white stripes closer to both edges. Its worth mentioning here that though award documents for the Cross of Honor for next-of-kin were of two different types (Ehrenkreuz für Witwen and Ehrenkreuz für Eltern) the award itself was only of one type as described above. The rarest type of the Cross of Honor for next-of-kin was made of iron and had a horizontal pin and catch on its reverse instead of ribbon ring that was missing. All three classes of the award had a flat reverse with makers mark. Ehrenkreuz des Weltkrieges was made of bronze or iron. The Cross of Honor was worn mounted as part of a group or on the ribbon bar. The award ranked above service and occupation medals but below combat related awards. Number of awards: Ehrenkreuz für Frontkämpfer 6,202,883 pieces, Ehrenkreuz für Kriegsteilnehmer 1,120,449 pieces, Ehrenkreuz für Hinterbliebene 345,112 pieces issued to widows with Ehrenkreuz für Witwen award document and Ehrenkreuz für Hinterbliebene 372,950 pieces issued to parents who lost their sons with Ehrenkreuz für Eltern award document. The medal was instituted on 10 May 1901 in bronze for combatants and those who had tended the sick and wounded in the war zone and in steel for non-combatants and support personnel. It was awarded for those who between 30 May 1900 and 29 June 1901 were numbered amongst either the German marines and civilians who took part in the defence of the Foreign Legations in Peking (Beijing) during the two and a half months siege by the Boxers or the German soldiers, marines and sailors who lifted the siege. The proposal of Emperor Wilhelm II for a common commemorative medal for the eight-nation alliance was rejected and each country (except Austria-Hungary) issued its own medal. The medal was designed by Professor Walter Schott of Berlin and manufactured by Mayer and Wilhelm of Stuttgart. The alliance fielded a force numbering 54,000 of whom 300 were German soldiers and 600 German marines with five German warships giving support. The small size of the German force makes this medal relatively rare. Prussian Long Service Cross for Officers for 25 years service Dienstauszeichnungskreuz für Offiziere für 25 Jahre – Gilt bronze cross pattée with stippled arms, with laterally-pierced loop for ribbon suspension; the face with a circular central medallion bearing the crowned cipher of King Friedrich Wilhelm III; the reverse with a circular central medallion bearing the Roman numerals XXV. (= 25); gilding age-faded; on replaced correct ribbon. The award was instituted on 18 June 1825 by King Friedrich Wilhelm III to reward long and faithful service. It was suppressed in 1920 after the abolition of the Prussian monarchy at the end of World War I. Prussian 1897 Centenary Medal (Zentenarmedaille) was officially titled the Medaille zur Erinnerung an des Hochseligen Kaisers und Königs Wilhelm I. Des Großen, Majestät to honor the 100th Birthday of Kaiser Wilhelm I. The recipients promptly dubbed it the Apfelorden (The Order of the Apple, due to it’s size and color). Modern German collectors often call it the Zitronorden (The Order of the Lemon, again due to it’s size and color and partly because they forget the name Apfelorden). The medal was designed by Professor Walter Schott and was made by the firm of L. The obverse shows a raised relief profile portrait of Kaiser Wilhelm I with the inscription WILHELM DEM GROSSE DEUTSCHER KAISER KOENIG VON PREUSSEN (Wilhelm the Great, German Emperor and King of Prussia). The reverse has the raised relief inscription ZUM ANDENKEN AN DEN HUNDERSTEN GEBURTSTAG DES GROSSEN KAISERS WILHELM I. 1797-22MAERZ-1897 In Rememberance of the Hundredth Birthday of the Great Emperor Wilhelm I. A design of a laurel leaf spray, oak leave branches, crown, scepter, orb, Bible, and sword arcs from the 3:30 to 11:00 position. The original silk ribbon is plain yellow (representing gold) which varies in width from 3cm +/. 5cm (depending on the maker). This award is a military decoration of an ex-service men’s organisation, unlikely to be government issue. Obverse description: bronze cross supported by laurel wreath with central medallion bearing text – “PRO PATRIA” (For the Fatherland). Date Issued: since 1918. Overall Dimensions 40 mm (Width), 45 mm (Height). Bavarian 15-Year Military Long Service Cross (Bayern 15 Jahre Dienstauszeichnung) was instituted in 1913 to replace the Militär Dienstauszeichnung Schnalle 2. It was awarded to military active duty NCO’s and enlisted personnel for 15 years active service and required the recommendation of their Commanding Officer. This medal was instituted by Prinz Regent Ludwig on 30th August 1913 and awarded by 1919. These are often found in WWI German medal groups and helps identifying the recipient as a Bavarian. The 15-Year Long Service Cross was made of a metal similar to a bronzed brass (the exact metal alloy was varied but the finishing techniques left a flat golden color) with a flat ring loop soldered on for the suspension through which a blue silk woven ribbon (UV-negative, usually 32-35 mm wide) is worn. The Cross size varied over the years at around 43-44. Both sides of the Cross have a small edged border. The obverse had the Bavarian coats of arms centered within a circle in the middle of the Cross. The reverse carried only a XV within a circle, which represented 15 years. The item “7192 German WW1 mounted medal group Iron Cross China Medal Bavarian Medals” is in sale since Friday, April 20, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in Abbots Langley. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Country/ Organization: Germany

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8

WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS – MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR – GROUP of 8. MEDAL MILITAIRE – CROIX DE GUERRE. If item is significantly not as described then a. The item “WW1 MINIATURE FRENCH MEDALS MOUNTED on BAR for WEAR GROUP of 8″ is in sale since Wednesday, April 25, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “royalflyingcorps” and is located in Halesowen. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: France
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: France

Mounted Ww1 German Iron Cross 2nd Class & Oldenburg Cross 3 Medal Set

Mounted Ww1 German Iron Cross 2nd Class & Oldenburg Cross 3 Medal Set

Mounted Ww1 German Iron Cross 2nd Class & Oldenburg Cross 3 Medal Set

Mounted Ww1 German Iron Cross 2nd Class & Oldenburg Cross 3 Medal Set

Offered is an original WW1 German medal bar of 3 awards, being the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class, Duchy of Oldenburg Friedrich August Cross, 2nd Class & War Merit Cross with Swords. Mounted for wear, court style with metal backing and pin backed. THANK YOU & GOOD LUCK! We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. 2/135 Russell St, Morley, WA. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “MOUNTED WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 2ND CLASS & OLDENBURG CROSS 3 MEDAL SET” is in sale since Wednesday, July 12, 2017. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Authenticity: Original
  • Country: Germany
  • Campaign: WW1
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Era: 1900s

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg

Great Britain Canada Boer War and WW1 Medal Group. QSA and KSA to CMP / Cape Mounted Police : both renamed. WW1 medal trio with original naming to 8th Canadian Infantry Black Devils 90th Winnipeg Rifles. Walter Adams , service number 12931 , born Cork Ireland 1882, attested for WW1 at Valcartier Quebec Canada September 1914, listing previous service in South Africa, and 12 years other service in the Cavalry and Hussars Queen’s South Africa Medal QSA re-named on edge in impressed letters: SGT : W. King’s South Africa Medal KSA re-named on edge in impressed letters: SGT. 1914 / 15 bronze star medal named on reverse in properly impressed letters: 12931 COL: Sjt W. 8/CAN:INF: Silver War Medal named on edge in properly impressed letters: 12931 C. B ronze Victory Medal named on edge in properly impressed letters: 12931 C. Both QSA and KSA are genuine medals, but renamed to Adams. Some undertype of the original naming is visible, but only very weak remnants, and I cannot decipher it. QSA and KSA both renamed! Lots of overall wear! GST / HST # 857353247. The item “Boer War WW1 Medals Irish Cape Mounted Police 8th Can Black Devils 90 Winnipeg” is in sale since Tuesday, February 06, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Great Britain\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “crawfordcsm” and is located in New Westminster, British Columbia. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Rare Pre Ww1 Western Australian Mounted Infantry Queens South Africa Medal Qsa

Queens South Africa Medal to Private George Jamieson, who served with the 5th Contingent, of the Western Australian Mounted Infantry during the Boer War. Queen’s South Africa Medal measures 36mm wide and is a circular silver medal with claw and swivel ribbon bar suspension, with TRANSVAAL. CAPE COLONY, ORANGE FREE STATE & SOUTH AFRICA 1901 clasps (the last 3 loose to ribbon); the face with the veiled crowned head and shoulders portrait of Queen Victoria facing left, circumscribed VICTORIA REGINA ET IMPERATRIX (Victoria Queen and Empress), signed G. De Saulles; attributed on the edge to 284 PTE G. The medal was instituted in 1899 to be awarded to participants in the Boer War. Private George P Jamieson was born in New Zealand and enlisted and served with the 5th Contingent, of the Western Australian Mounted Infantry during the Boer War. Married Margaret Lowery in Coolgardie in 1912 and is shown as died in Coolgardie in 1921. The 5th and 6th West Australian Mounted Infantrycombined strength in June about 355 men and 380 horseswere in the column of Major General F W Kitchener, who long worked in the Lydenburg district, and generally over the Eastern Transvaal. The 5th took part in sharp actions in and around Grobelaar Recht & Waterval River with several men killed and wounded. Please view our guide on spotting fake militaria. We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. 2/135 Russell St, Morley, WA. We run two specialist military auctions per year, details of which can be found on our website. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “RARE PRE WW1 WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MOUNTED INFANTRY QUEENS SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL QSA” is in sale since Sunday, November 13, 2016. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Authenticity: Original
  • Era: 1900s
  • Country: ENGLAND
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Campaign: World War I