Posts tagged george

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36

For sale here is a great looking WW1 Era Civil British Imperial Service Order. The medal is complete with full sized star medal and ribbon. The ribbon is original and has a maker marked pin back. The pin back is maker marked Elkington 22 Regent St. The medal is named to Phillip J. The medal shows age, wear, and use. This is a great medal that will make a great addition to any collection. Please feel free to ask any questions that you may have. Please take a look at my other great items! The item “WW1 Era George V British Imperial Service Order Star Medal Named Maker Mark B36″ is in sale since Tuesday, February 26, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Great Britain\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “cadencemilitaria” and is located in Lenoir, North Carolina. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF

Excellent condition, scarce WW2 & WW1 C. Group awarded to Brigadier George Frederick Charles Assistant Director Dental Services Late Army, ANZACS & Royal Air Force Dental Corps, C. Neck badge, 1914-15 Star (Lt G F Charles), British war & Victory medal (Capt G F Charles), 1939-45 Star, British war & Defence medal 1939-45, coronation medal 1937, some history and copy medal rolls, awards all verified, CBE and WW2 medals unnamed as issued, interesting story for further research, excellent condition, some slight enamel chipping to upper arm of C. E, see pictures for condition. Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF. Very scarce WW1 & 2 Military C. E medal group Brigadier Dental Corps RAMC. London Gazette 14 June 1945. The Original Recommendation states: Colonel Charles has administered the Army Dental Services in Scottish Command for over three years. To his organising ability and wide experience, coupled with energy and enthusiasm, are due the excellent dental arrangements in the Command. During the mobilisation and special training of the large forces for overseas many dental problems arose and were successfully overcome under his supervision. In short, the high standard of dental fitness of all troops in and leaving the Command is undoubtedly due to his zeal and efficiency – attributes which have inspired all his officers and men in their work in the common cause. George Frederick Charles was born in 24th February 1891, Heywood, Lancashire and joined the Army Dental Corps (arm of RAMC) as Temporary Lieutenant in September 1915. He married Dorothy Bailey December 1916, in Builth, Breconshire, mid Wales. He served as a Dental Officer during the Great War on the Western Front , France from 8 October 1915, later serving in the ANZACS 11th Battalion Australian Infantry from 11 July 1918. THE HUNDRED DAYS OFFENSIVE-ANZACS 11TH Battalion-all out war. British Troops advance Around this time, a small group of US soldiers was attached to the 11th Battalion to gain experience. The following month, the battalion captured Gerbedoen Farm before supporting the 10th Battalion’s successful attack on Merris. On 8 August, the Allies launched their own offensive, known as the Hundred Days Offensive, around Amiens. The 11th Battalion did not take part in the opening phase of the offensive, moving to Hamel and establishing themselves in a defensive position around Harbonnieres. On 10 August, the battalion was committed to a strong attack around Lihons; although successful, the attack lasted three days and resulted in heavy casualties, including 58 killed and 140 wounded. On the night of 12/13 August, the 11th was withdrawn to the support line just behind the front. WW1 British Tank Later, they were moved to Vaire and then Cerisy, before supporting the 9th and 12th Battalions around Chuignolles and Proyart on 23 August and then around Chuignes and Cappy two days later, where further losses were experienced. The 11th Battalion’s final attack came against the Hindenburg Outpost Line on 18 September when they launched a three-company attack around Fervaque Farm and Carpeza Copse near Villeret. Despite being severely understrength each company had an average strength of just 76 men they advanced over 3,000 yards (2,700 m) and took over 120 prisoners and large quantities of German equipment, for the loss of 18 men killed. WW1 German and Allied Fighters in dog fight over western front Further casualties came on 24 October when German aircraft attacked the battalion headquarters, killing a number of officers, including Darnell, who was the acting commanding officer. The heavy casualties that the Australians had suffered during the final year of the war, and the decrease in volunteers arriving from Australia, meant that the battalion was desperately understrength. Germans Surrender In October, they were withdrawn from the line for rest and reorganisation, at the insistence of the Australian prime minister, Billy Hughes. At this time, the battalion was reorganised into a two-company structure. In early November, the battalion prepared to return to the front around St. Quentin, but before they could return to the fighting, an armistice came into effect, bringing the war to an end Captain Charles just after end of WW1 transferred to the Royal Air Force Dental Service in 1919. He reverted back to the Army Dental Corps two years later, with whom he held various appointments between the wars. Advanced Colonel on 1 July 1939, he embarked for France as Deputy Director Dental Services with Medical HQ and Staff of the British Expeditionary Force on 10 September 1939. German Panzers advance – ” Blitzkreig”, Summer 1940, France He formed two additional Dental units at Boulogne and Dieppe but these were rapidly overrun by the German attack in the summer of 1940. He retired on 16 August 1946, died in the village of “Battle”, Sussex 1957 aged 66. Auctiva gets you noticed! Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “Scarce Brigadier George F Charles CBE WW1 WW2 medals RAMC Dentist & ANZACS & RAF” is in sale since Sunday, December 22, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Other World War I Militaria”. The seller is “theonlineauctionsale” and is located in Leamington Spa. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: WW I (1914-18) & WW 2 (1939-45)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A

BUYERS & SELLERS OF. JEWELLERY / MILITARIA & COLLECTABLES. PLEASE READ CAREFULLY BEFORE CONTINUING…. WHAT YOU SEE IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS IS WHAT YOU WILL RECIEVE… NOTHING MORE / NOTHING LESS. IF AN ITEM COMES WITH PACKAGING OR PAPERWORK IT WILL BE INCLUDED IN THE LISTING & SHOWN IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS. I DO CONCIDER BEST OFFERS ON ALL MY ITEMS BUT DUE TO TIMEWASTERS I WILL ONLY REPLY TO SENSIBLE OFFERS. ANY BOXES THAT ARE INCLUDED WITH THE WATCHES I SELL ARE 100% AUTHENTIC TO THE BRAND LISTED BUT NOT NECESSARILY ORIGINAL TO THE WATCH UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. PLEASE BE AWARE NONE OF THE WATCHES I SELL HAVE BEEN TESTED FOR WATER RESISTENCE. ANY VISUAL OR MECHANICAL FAULTS ARE LISTED IN THE FAULT SECTION AT THE BOTTOM OF THE LISTING. THIS LISTING IS FOR…. 3 original full sized WW1 medals. All 3 medals were issued to 229280 DVR. The War & Victory medal are stamped: R. The Bravery in the field medal is stamped R. All 3 medals look to be in good condition but please study the photographs carefully and make up your own mind as to their condition. All 3 medal comes with their correct ribbons. They were mounted using double sided sticky pads at some point and still have visible signs of this on the reverse of the ribbons. Sometimes I may replace a visibly worn or broken strap. Before being listed, each watch will be tested for time keeping over a 24 hour period. Because of the lack of service history with a lot of the watches i sell NO GUARANTEES are given or implied to the time keeping after a 24 hour period unless otherwise stated. Please bare in mind the majority of the watches i sell are PRE-OWNED & VINTAGE so they will show varying degrees of age & wear. PLEASE STUDY ALL THE PHOTOGRAPHS CAREFULLY AS THEY MAKE UP A VITAL PART OF THE DESCRIPTION. All items are described to the best of my ability. Please get intouch before leaving feedback as i will do my best to rectify any problem. The item “3 Original WW1 Medals War Victory & George V Bravery In The Field R. F. A R. A” is in sale since Sunday, October 20, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “mad-albert-the-2nd” and is located in sedgley, West Midlands. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI

Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI. Check out my other items! SEE MY OTHER ITEMS ON SALE! GENERAL CONDITIONS OF SALE. For European Union citizens ONLY bank transfer in Euros! PENTRU LICITATORII DIN ROMANIA – Trimit doar cu PRIORIPOST / FANCOURIER (costa – 20 Lei) dupa ce primesc plata in AVANS, in cont la Banca Transilvania. NU TRIMIT CU RAMBURS!!! If you don’t want the item, DON’T PAY for it! These delays are out of my reach and out of my responsibility. Feel free to ask me any questions, and I will try to answer as soon as possible. You can also write to me if you need higher resolution pictures. If you encounter any problems, please message me first, before leaving feedback. The item “Russia Imperial Medal St. George Cross 4th ORIGINAL Russian Order Award WW1 WWI” is in sale since Tuesday, April 17, 2018. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\Russia\Empire (up to 1917)”. The seller is “medals-and-orders” and is located in Bucharest, European Union. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Russian Federation
  • Country of Manufacture: Russia
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Circulated
  • Certification: Uncertified
  • Grade: Ungraded
  • Composition: Silver
  • Year: 1917

Great Britain WW1 Military Cross MC George V British Medal Decoration 1914 1918

Great Britain WW1 Military Cross MC George V British Medal Decoration 1914 1918

Great Britain WW1 Military Cross MC George V British Medal Decoration 1914 1918

Great Britain WW1 Military Cross MC George V British Medal Decoration 1914 1918

GREAT BRITAIN: Military Cross, King George V. Instituted in 1914 the Military Cross is the 3rd level military award, issued to Officers below the rank of Captain (and since 1933 to other ranks too). The medal had been awarded to a French recipient. This is a French, privately made example. Item 100% original on original ribbon. Condition as on the photos. World War 1 1914 -1918. A GREAT ADDITION TO EVERY COLLECTION!!!!! The item “Great Britain WW1 Military Cross MC George V British Medal Decoration 1914 1918″ is in sale since Wednesday, April 3, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Great Britain\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “geoderrina” and is located in Tirana. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

Greece Greek Order King George Commander Badge Cross Swords Ww2 War Medal Mappin

GREECE GREEK ORDER KING GEORGE COMMANDER BADGE CROSS SWORDS WW2 WAR MEDAL MAPPIN. GREECE GREEK ORDER OF KING GEORGE I COMMANDER’S BADGE CROSS WITH SWORDS WW2 WAR MEDAL MAPPIN & WEBB Ltd. Up for sale here. An authentic vintage and rare, World War II, Greek Royal Medal. Is the Order of King George I Commander’s neck Cross with Swords Badge by Mappin & Webb Ltd. Medal comes boxed in its original presentation storage case. ORDER OF KING GEORGE I. COMMANDER’S NECK CROSS WITH SWORDS. CIRCA – WAR (1921-25 & 1935-73). BY MAPPIN & WEBB Ltd. WITH ORIGINAL RIBBON & CASE. The Order of the King George I Commander’s Cross Medal with Swords was established in 1921 and was awarded for distinguished services and prominent acts relating to the Military, Nautical and Air operations of Greece. The Medal consists of a fixed white-enamel Cross, the antennae are slightly flattened at the ends and the horizontal shorters. Cross center is red enameled with the Royal Monogram of the King George I, two Greek G crossed, and sign which reads “My Power is People’s Love”. Cross is surrounded by an elliptical laurell wreath. The back side bears the dates 1863 and 1913 in remembrance the King George’s I reign, and date 1915 in a circle, the year of Medal founding. In Medal with swords, the crossed swords penetrate the laurel wreath and the center of the Cross with their spikes on the top right and left. Movable pierced Crown with loop on the top. Ribbon has deep red color in remembrance of the assassination of the King George I in 1913. Original Case has on the lid gold embossed Crown Royal Emblem of the King George I and interior bears maker’s name Mappin & Webb Ltd. ” Reference/last 2 Photos: George Beldecos Book (Hellenic Orders Decorations and Medals) pages 38 and 39″ – (Book Not included in this lot). “ORDER OF KING GEORGE I COMMANDER’S CROSS & CASE” 1. 1.850 inches or 4.7 cm Width Cross Crown has approx… 3.267 inches or 8.3 cm Length. Cross Crown & double loop has approx… 3.937 inches or 10 cm Total Length. 16.929/40.551 inches or 43/103 cm Length. 1.496 inches or 3.8 cm Width Cross weight (without ribbon)… 58 gr or 2.05 oz. Shows normal signs of wear commensurate with age and use, Cross is without dents, cracks, enamel loss, medal is age tarnished with slight signs of gilding loss. Movable pierced Crown and Loop are also in very good condition with no damage. Ribbon is in a very good condition without discoloration, age rust stains, holes, tears, odor, damage or any restoration. 1.338 inches or 3.4 cm Tall. 3.543 inches or 9 cm Width. 4.881 inches or 12.4 cm Length. 103 gr or 3.60 oz (case empty). The exterior of the Box. Is with no wear, discoloration, scratches, tears, paint or gilding loss. Gold embossed Crown Royal Emblem and gold trim on the lid cover is in great condition with no gilding loss. The interior of the Box, ecrou velvet case and satin lining of the lid are in great condition, clean with no humidity age stains, holes, tears, odor, or any damage. Hinge and push button lock works perfect, box opens and close as it should. 167 gr or 5.90 oz – Unpackaged. We have plenty of close-up day-light photos to look carefully and if you. / Australia & Other countries out of Europe: FREE. Thanks for looking and GOOD LUCK. Please check out all other items. Auctiva offers Free Image Hosting and Editing. Auctiva gets you noticed! Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “GREECE GREEK ORDER KING GEORGE COMMANDER BADGE CROSS SWORDS WW2 WAR MEDAL MAPPIN” is in sale since Friday, November 2, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\Other WWII Original Items”. The seller is “golden-place-sales” and is located in Athens. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

WW2 Naval Group inc Malta George Cross 50th Anniversary Medal + Russian Convoy

WW2 Naval Group inc Malta George Cross 50th Anniversary Medal + Russian Convoy

WW2 Naval Group inc Malta George Cross 50th Anniversary Medal + Russian Convoy

WW2 Naval Group inc Malta George Cross 50th Anniversary Medal + Russian Convoy

A genuine WW2 full size Navy Group. This has a 1939/45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, Italy Star, Defence Medal, War Medal, Malta George Cross 50th Anniversary and a Russian Convoy Medal. All mounted on a bar for wear. The item “WW2 Naval Group inc Malta George Cross 50th Anniversary Medal + Russian Convoy” is in sale since Tuesday, April 9, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “raw-collections” and is located in Wellingborough. This item can be shipped to United Kingdom, Antigua and barbuda, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Australia, United States, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, China, Israel, Hong Kong, Norway, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Bangladesh, Belize, Bermuda, Bolivia, Barbados, Brunei darussalam, Cayman islands, Dominica, Egypt, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Grenada, French guiana, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Macao, Monaco, Maldives, Montserrat, Martinique, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Turks and caicos islands, Aruba, Saudi arabia, South africa, United arab emirates, Ukraine, Chile.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Malta
  • Country/ Organization: Russia
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Era: 1945-Present

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Here we have a Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group, Major Biddle served in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Metropolitan Police Force and Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, He was awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Member (Civil) (frosted silver, oak leaf cluster for gallantry on the ribbon) rare as this was the last year it was issued before being replaced by the Queens Gallantry Medal. Naming is officially impressed on the GSM, the George Medal is a replica as the original is in possession of the family, the other three awards are un-named as issued. Mounted to a suspension with swing bar pinback, replacement ribbons, light contact, near extremely fine. Geoffrey William Biddle was born on May 7, 1917 in Bromley, Kent, England. Biddle enlisted as a Private (7664096) with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps at Brighton, East Sussex on March 5, 1940, in the RAOC he became Ammunition Examiner on May 30, 1942. He was promoted to Acting Staff Sergeant on June 4, 1943 and to Staff Sergeant on December 1, 1943. He was awarded four service chevrons on March 5, 1944 and attended the 29th Regimental Sergeant Majors’ Course at Leicester three months later, on June 1st. He achieved the ranks of Warrant Officer 2nd Class (Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant) on December 28, 1944 and Warrant Officer 1st Class (Sergeant Commander) on November 14, 1945, before being promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947. After the war, Biddle was commissioned as an Ammunition Technical Officer and served in Germany, Kenya, Cyprus and the Middle East, and was later promoted to Captain. While still with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Captain G. Biddle (366892) was promoted to the rank of Major, effective August 6, 1959, the announcement appearing in the Supplement to the London Gazette 41782 of Tuesday, August 4, 1959, on Friday, August 7, 1959, page 4917. One of his last tasks as an Army officer was to deal with a parcel marked “Explosives” on an Underground (subway) train near Mansion House. It turned out to be a hoax. Biddle retired from the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1964 with the rank of Major. In November 1964, he joined the Metropolitan Police Force in London. By 1964, the Metropolitan Police Force was facing a wave of safe-blowings using gelignite or nitro-glycerine. Explosives left at the scene of bungled robberies had to be made safe and recovered, with Major Donald Henderson advising officers on scene management and evidence collection. Henderson impressed the senior officers so much that he was asked to set up a bomb disposal unit. Now also retired from the Army, Major Henderson, with his friend and colleague, the now retired Army officer Major Geoffrey Biddle, became police explosives officers at the Explosives Office at Cannon Row police station, establishing C7 (2) Branch and became experts in the field. Their early work paved the way for police anti-terrorist operations throughout the 1970s. Both were part of the close-knit civilian team who responded to the Provisional IRA’s mainland bombing campaign, and the Arab attacks later that decade. The Explosives Office was visited by delegates from all over the world, and the procedures Henderson had established were copied widely. Major Biddle was later named Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard and he was no stranger to unpredictable terrorist devices. In March 1973, he had rendered harmless the first IRA (Irish Republican Army) car bomb in London, outside New Scotland Yard itself. On the same day, two bombs, one at the Old Bailey and the other at the Ministry of Agriculture, killed one man and injured more than 200 others. In court later that year, Biddle produced a small black wooden box which had contained the timing mechanism for the 175-pound bomb. Biddle had opened the door of the car, a Ford Corsair, noting the pungent smell of explosives and spotted a white wire running under the carpet leading to a large charge under the rear seat. Biddle agreed with the judge, Mr. Justice Sebag Shaw, that it could have been fitted with a booby trap. Asked how he knew the bomb was not fitted as such, Biddle replied It’s a matter of intuition and er… “, the Judge adding “And hope? “, with Biddle confirming “And hope. Before Biddle left the witness box, the Judge said: “I would like to pay tribute to your courage”. Later that year, Major Biddle was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, along with two others, the announcement and citation appearing in the Second Supplement to the London Gazette 46156 of Monday, December 17, 1973, on Tuesday, December 18, 1973, page 15033-34: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. James’s Palace, London S. The QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the undermentioned appointments to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, and to approve the awards of the George Medal and the British Empire Medal for Gallantry (Civil Division) and for the publication in the London Gazette of the names of those specially shown below as having received an expression of Commendation for Brave Conduct. To be additional Members of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for Gallantry: Major Geoffrey William Biddle, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Captain Richard Vernon Hawkins, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Peter Edwin Spencer Gurney, G. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Following a report that a suspicious car was parked near two buildings which had wide areas of glass in their walls and housed large numbers of staff, Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney went to the scene. Quickly realizing the gravity of the situation they managed to get into the car and immediately recognised the smell of explosives. They saw a cord protruding from beneath the passenger seat which they knew was a detonating cord and this was traced to the rear seat which was lifted and found to be packed with explosives. They now realised they were dealing with a very large bomb and ensured that the immediate area was evacuated and that staff in the surrounding buildings were warned before they began the dangerous task of rendering the device safe. The officers found the initiatory system of the bomb in a wooden box under the front seat; Mr. Gurney severed the detonating cord and together they removed the back seat containing the explosives as far as possible from the initiatory system. They suspected that there might be a second such system and immediately unpacked the seat squab and separated the bags of explosives to reduce the effects of any explosion. When the box was opened it was found to contain a device based on an alarm clock which would have exploded the bomb at 3 p. The car was then searched for further explosives and none being found, it was declared safe. During the morning Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney with other colleagues were extremely busy attending to further suspect car bombs; these turned out to be false alarms. At about 2 p. That afternoon an anonymous call to a newspaper warned that further car bombs had been planted and Mr. Gurney with Captain Hawkins went to deal with one of them. From the earlier events of the day they realised that the time for the detonation of any further bombs might be perilously close and they immediately approached the car and gained access. Again they were met by the distinctive smell of explosives and rapidly located a detonating cord in a position like the one found previously. The bomb was similar to the earlier one and having cut the detonating cord they removed the rear seat squab. Captain Hawkins carefully dismantled the explosive charge and made certain it contained no secondary means of detonation while Mr. Gurney made the initiatory device safe; this was again found to be based on an alarm clock and would have caused the bomb to explode at about 2.50 p. Together the officers searched the car for any further explosives and finally declared it safe. Major Biddle, Captain Hawkins and Mr. Gurney were all involved in exceptional risks and displayed courage of a very high order and in successfully dismantling these bombs they undoubtedly saved a large number of people from very serious injury or even death. The month after the announcement of his award of the MBE, in early January 1974, Major Biddle and Major Ronald Wilson, a fellow officer from the Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, were called to five incidents in two days. One bomb went off at Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum while Wilson was collecting tools to deal with it, while Biddle was called to another incident at the Boat Show at Earl’s Court. The bomb there went off while he was on the way to deal with it, but meanwhile he was summoned to defuse another device in Ealing, west London. Inside a large plastic carrier bag, he found a 15-pound bomb in a corrugated box stamped with the name of a Dublin firm of biscuit manufacturers. Biddle recalled the incident: I was alone. This is a one-man task. I could hear a distinct ticking sound. I proceeded immediately to defuse the bomb. Only after dismantling it, did Biddle discover a clock hand on its timing device was only thirty seconds from making contact with a brass screw that would have set off an explosion. In the early hours on the next day, Biddle was called to two other incidents: one bomb in Chelsea blew up before he could reach it, the other bomb was in Kensington, in a gray-mottled suitcase that could be seen on the doorstep of the basement of a house occupied by Major-General Sir Cecil Blacker, Adjutant-General. The street lighting had been extinguished. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope, and because of the lack of space in which to work, Biddle was obliged to move it. Inside the case, he found 112 four-ounce gelignite cartridges and was able to dismantle the bomb by undoing battery connections. At the trial of the IRA men sentenced for the bombings, Mr, Justice Melford Stevenson praised both Biddle and Wilson for their efforts. Much of Biddle’s work was carried out in secrecy, but in 1975, a court heard how a bomb sent by a jilted lover blew up in his face, scorching his wrist and eyebrows. He is credited with having defused numerous terrorist bombs, including an IRA device intended to kill Sir Edward Heath in 1975. Heath had been a British politician, who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and was the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975, losing the leadership of the party to Margaret Thatcher in February 1975. On November 9, 1975, Biddle had been called out in the early hours, to deal with a car parked by Heath’s house in Belgravia. Under the car was a duffel bag, so all local residents were evacuated. From where Biddel lay in the gutter, he could see that the bag was wedged fast under the car and tied with a cord. Due to the background noise, he could not hear if it was ticking. Biddle pivoted the bag, so that its open end faced him in the gutter. He had to ensure that the pressure contact between the bag and the car was maintained. Reaching under the car, he managed to cut the cord and open the bag wide enough to dismantle the bomb. Biddle was praised for his efforts by Mr. Justice Cantley at the Old Bailey in 1977, during the Judge’s speech when sentencing the terrorists: “I want to commend the men of true worth, unarmed policemen who faced and chased these criminals, and the bomb disposal experts such as Major Biddle”. Major Biddle was awarded the George Medal for his “outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty” in defusing four terrorist bombs, on January 5 & 6, 1974, May 19, 1974 and November 9, 1975. The announcement and citation for his George Medal appeared in the Third Supplement to the London Gazette 47085 of Monday, December 6, 1976, on Tuesday, December 7, 1976, page 16447-48: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. THE QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following award of the George Medal. Awarded the George Medal Major Geoffrey William BIDDLE, M. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police. Bearing in mind police warnings to be cautious of explosives attached to stationery vehicles, they looked under their car and saw a duffle bag jammed underneath below the front passenger seat. Without interfering with the bag they called the police. Major Biddle was summoned to the scene which had been sealed to traffic and pedestrians and after the initial examination it was decided that the residents of nearby houses should be evacuated before the bag was examined in more detail. There was only a small amount of ground clearance under the car and Major Biddle could see that the tightly wedged object was securely closed by a cord. Being unable to touch the bag he tackled the inspection by lying in the gutter, but because of background noises was unable to decide whether or not the bomb was ticking. Major Biddle slowly pivotted the device so that the opening was facing where he was lying in the gutter; this had to be done very gently so that the pressure contact between the bag and the vehicle remained unbroken. When the bag was close enough he managed to cut the cord, open the bag and this enabled him to disarm the device sufficiently to pull it from under the car and render it completely safe. The bomb would have detonated if the bag had been removed or if the car had been subjected to any movement. Major Biddle has over a period been involved in defusing other terrorist explosive devices. On 5th January 1974 following a day of terrorist bomb activity, he was called to some premises where the area had been evacuated following the discovery of a suspicious object. The device had been placed among several plastic bags in a badly lit position and was seen to contain a clock, batteries and explosives. Major Biddle defused the bomb by cutting the wiring to the batteries and then removed the detonator. He then managed to reach the clock, the setting of which showed that the device was probably within seconds of exploding at the time it was disarmed. In the early hours of the following day, 6th January 1974, Major Biddle was called to the front basement of a house where a suitcase had been left on the doorstep; he noticed that the street lighting was extinguished and the area was in darkness. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope and due to a lack of room in which to work, Major Biddle was obliged to move it from its original position. When the case was opened it was found to contain explosives, a battery and a clock. The bomb was made safe by disconnecting the wire to the battery and removing the detonator. Had this bomb exploded considerable damage and injury could have been caused. Major Biddle also defused a bomb contained in a haversack and left at the rear of some premises on 19th May 1974. Major Biddle displayed outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty in tackling these highly dangerous devices, often under difficult circumstances. Biddle’s George Medal investiture took place at Buckingham Palace and was conducted by Prince Charles, on Tuesday, February 15, 1977. It was also the Prince’s first time conducting an investiture. Biddle is acknowledged as having been an MBE and having received the award in 1976 on the Metropolitan Police Gallantry Awards website, for having defused four terrorist bombs during his work as an Explosives Officer. He retired from policing in 1981. Geoffrey William Biddle died in February 1997 in South East Surrey, Surrey, England, at the age of 79. His wife, Lilian, pre-deceased him in 1987. Sir Edward Heath fondly remembered Biddle after his death, stating: Men such as Geoffrey Biddle are too often the unsung heroes of out time, but the freedom we enjoy in our everyday lives depend upon such very special men. I personally owed him a particular debt of thanks because he once showed incredible sang-froid (from the French: cold blood) in defusing a bomb, which turned out to be the first of a new type of device, outside my own home in London. Geoffrey Biddle was an inspiring Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard while the Troubles were at their height, and he will truly be missed. ” (C:106) The Set is Accompanied by his Commission Document named to “Geoffrey William Biddle, Lieutenant, Land Forces, promoting him to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947, dated May 9, 1947 at St. James Palace, stamped signature of George VI, two other signatures, embossed seal of Princess Elizabeth, 303 mm x 407 mm; his Second World War Soldier’s Service and Pay Book (handwritten entries, 100 mm x 127 mm, wear evident on the cover); a Letter from the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, St. James Palace addressed to Major Geoffery William Biddle, M. “, in regards to the Secretary transmitting a Warrant of Appointment to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 198 mm x 238 mm; a Letter from the Metropolitan Police (dated October 15, 1980, with attached letter received from the West German Embassy dated October 10, 1980, 210 mm x 297 mm); a NATO Pass numbered “818, with an expiry date of June 30, 1960 in French, signed by Major Biddle U. Delegation and NATO Head of Security Service, 78 mm x 110 mm; a New Scotland Yard C7 Branch Athletic & Social Club Membership Card (numbered “102″, signed by the Honourary Secretary of the Club, 60 mm x 92 mm); a Special Forces Club Membership Card named to G. Biddle”, dated October 1979/80, signed by the Club Secretary, 59 mm x 80 mm; two The Snowball Club Ladies’ Night For Charity Tickets (numbered “254″ and “255, 114 mm x 150 mm); forty-four Photographs (black and white or colour, two portraits in uniform, three in the field, the remaining photos of friends, family and award ceremonies, various sizes); numerous newspaper articles c. 1970s; thirty business cards (most of which are card-mounted), along with assorted research papers. This medal group would be perfect for medal dealers, rare medal group collectors, bomb disposal, police collectors, museums, displays, christmas gift and much much more! The item “Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group” is in sale since Sunday, January 13, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Service: Home Front/ Civil Defence
  • Modified Item: Yes
  • Featured Refinements: Medal Group
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Modification Description: George Medal is a Museum Quality Replica
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Here we have a Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group, Major Biddle served in the. Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Metropolitan Police Force and Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, He was awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Member (Civil) (frosted silver, oak leaf cluster for gallantry on the ribbon) rare as this was the last year it was issued before being replaced by the Queens Gallantry Medal. Naming is officially impressed on the GSM, the George Medal is a replica as the original is in possession of the family, the other three awards are un-named as issued. Mounted to a suspension with swing bar pinback, replacement ribbons, light contact, near extremely fine. Geoffrey William Biddle was born on May 7, 1917 in Bromley, Kent, England. Biddle enlisted as a Private (7664096) with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps at Brighton, East Sussex on March 5, 1940, in the RAOC he became Ammunition Examiner on May 30, 1942. He was promoted to Acting Staff Sergeant on June 4, 1943 and to Staff Sergeant on December 1, 1943. He was awarded four service chevrons on March 5, 1944 and attended the 29th Regimental Sergeant Majors’ Course at Leicester three months later, on June 1st. He achieved the ranks of Warrant Officer 2nd Class (Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant) on December 28, 1944 and Warrant Officer 1st Class (Sergeant Commander) on November 14, 1945, before being promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947. After the war, Biddle was commissioned as an Ammunition Technical Officer and served in Germany, Kenya, Cyprus and the Middle East, and was later promoted to Captain. While still with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Captain G. Biddle (366892) was promoted to the rank of Major, effective August 6, 1959, the announcement appearing in the Supplement to the London Gazette 41782 of Tuesday, August 4, 1959, on Friday, August 7, 1959, page 4917. One of his last tasks as an Army officer was to deal with a parcel marked “Explosives” on an Underground (subway) train near Mansion House. It turned out to be a hoax. Biddle retired from the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1964 with the rank of Major. In November 1964, he joined the Metropolitan Police Force in London. By 1964, the Metropolitan Police Force was facing a wave of safe-blowings using gelignite or nitro-glycerine. Explosives left at the scene of bungled robberies had to be made safe and recovered, with Major Donald Henderson advising officers on scene management and evidence collection. Henderson impressed the senior officers so much that he was asked to set up a bomb disposal unit. Now also retired from the Army, Major Henderson, with his friend and colleague, the now retired Army officer Major Geoffrey Biddle, became police explosives officers at the Explosives Office at Cannon Row police station, establishing C7 (2) Branch and became experts in the field. Their early work paved the way for police anti-terrorist operations throughout the 1970s. Both were part of the close-knit civilian team who responded to the Provisional IRA’s mainland bombing campaign, and the Arab attacks later that decade. The Explosives Office was visited by delegates from all over the world, and the procedures Henderson had established were copied widely. Major Biddle was later named Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard and he was no stranger to unpredictable terrorist devices. In March 1973, he had rendered harmless the first IRA (Irish Republican Army) car bomb in London, outside New Scotland Yard itself. On the same day, two bombs, one at the Old Bailey and the other at the Ministry of Agriculture, killed one man and injured more than 200 others. In court later that year, Biddle produced a small black wooden box which had contained the timing mechanism for the 175-pound bomb. Biddle had opened the door of the car, a Ford Corsair, noting the pungent smell of explosives and spotted a white wire running under the carpet leading to a large charge under the rear seat. Biddle agreed with the judge, Mr. Justice Sebag Shaw, that it could have been fitted with a booby trap. Asked how he knew the bomb was not fitted as such, Biddle replied It’s a matter of intuition and er… “, the Judge adding “And hope? “, with Biddle confirming “And hope. Before Biddle left the witness box, the Judge said: “I would like to pay tribute to your courage”. Later that year, Major Biddle was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, along with two others, the announcement and citation appearing in the Second Supplement to the London Gazette 46156 of Monday, December 17, 1973, on Tuesday, December 18, 1973, page 15033-34: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. James’s Palace, London S. The QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the undermentioned appointments to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, and to approve the awards of the George Medal and the British Empire Medal for Gallantry (Civil Division) and for the publication in the London Gazette of the names of those specially shown below as having received an expression of Commendation for Brave Conduct. To be additional Members of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for Gallantry: Major Geoffrey William Biddle, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Captain Richard Vernon Hawkins, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Peter Edwin Spencer Gurney, G. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Following a report that a suspicious car was parked near two buildings which had wide areas of glass in their walls and housed large numbers of staff, Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney went to the scene. Quickly realizing the gravity of the situation they managed to get into the car and immediately recognised the smell of explosives. They saw a cord protruding from beneath the passenger seat which they knew was a detonating cord and this was traced to the rear seat which was lifted and found to be packed with explosives. They now realised they were dealing with a very large bomb and ensured that the immediate area was evacuated and that staff in the surrounding buildings were warned before they began the dangerous task of rendering the device safe. The officers found the initiatory system of the bomb in a wooden box under the front seat; Mr. Gurney severed the detonating cord and together they removed the back seat containing the explosives as far as possible from the initiatory system. They suspected that there might be a second such system and immediately unpacked the seat squab and separated the bags of explosives to reduce the effects of any explosion. When the box was opened it was found to contain a device based on an alarm clock which would have exploded the bomb at 3 p. The car was then searched for further explosives and none being found, it was declared safe. During the morning Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney with other colleagues were extremely busy attending to further suspect car bombs; these turned out to be false alarms. At about 2 p. That afternoon an anonymous call to a newspaper warned that further car bombs had been planted and Mr. Gurney with Captain Hawkins went to deal with one of them. From the earlier events of the day they realised that the time for the detonation of any further bombs might be perilously close and they immediately approached the car and gained access. Again they were met by the distinctive smell of explosives and rapidly located a detonating cord in a position like the one found previously. The bomb was similar to the earlier one and having cut the detonating cord they removed the rear seat squab. Captain Hawkins carefully dismantled the explosive charge and made certain it contained no secondary means of detonation while Mr. Gurney made the initiatory device safe; this was again found to be based on an alarm clock and would have caused the bomb to explode at about 2.50 p. Together the officers searched the car for any further explosives and finally declared it safe. Major Biddle, Captain Hawkins and Mr. Gurney were all involved in exceptional risks and displayed courage of a very high order and in successfully dismantling these bombs they undoubtedly saved a large number of people from very serious injury or even death. The month after the announcement of his award of the MBE, in early January 1974, Major Biddle and Major Ronald Wilson, a fellow officer from the Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, were called to five incidents in two days. One bomb went off at Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum while Wilson was collecting tools to deal with it, while Biddle was called to another incident at the Boat Show at Earl’s Court. The bomb there went off while he was on the way to deal with it, but meanwhile he was summoned to defuse another device in Ealing, west London. Inside a large plastic carrier bag, he found a 15-pound bomb in a corrugated box stamped with the name of a Dublin firm of biscuit manufacturers. Biddle recalled the incident: I was alone. This is a one-man task. I could hear a distinct ticking sound. I proceeded immediately to defuse the bomb. Only after dismantling it, did Biddle discover a clock hand on its timing device was only thirty seconds from making contact with a brass screw that would have set off an explosion. In the early hours on the next day, Biddle was called to two other incidents: one bomb in Chelsea blew up before he could reach it, the other bomb was in Kensington, in a gray-mottled suitcase that could be seen on the doorstep of the basement of a house occupied by Major-General Sir Cecil Blacker, Adjutant-General. The street lighting had been extinguished. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope, and because of the lack of space in which to work, Biddle was obliged to move it. Inside the case, he found 112 four-ounce gelignite cartridges and was able to dismantle the bomb by undoing battery connections. At the trial of the IRA men sentenced for the bombings, Mr, Justice Melford Stevenson praised both Biddle and Wilson for their efforts. Much of Biddle’s work was carried out in secrecy, but in 1975, a court heard how a bomb sent by a jilted lover blew up in his face, scorching his wrist and eyebrows. He is credited with having defused numerous terrorist bombs, including an IRA device intended to kill Sir Edward Heath in 1975. Heath had been a British politician, who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and was the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975, losing the leadership of the party to Margaret Thatcher in February 1975. On November 9, 1975, Biddle had been called out in the early hours, to deal with a car parked by Heath’s house in Belgravia. Under the car was a duffel bag, so all local residents were evacuated. From where Biddel lay in the gutter, he could see that the bag was wedged fast under the car and tied with a cord. Due to the background noise, he could not hear if it was ticking. Biddle pivoted the bag, so that its open end faced him in the gutter. He had to ensure that the pressure contact between the bag and the car was maintained. Reaching under the car, he managed to cut the cord and open the bag wide enough to dismantle the bomb. Biddle was praised for his efforts by Mr. Justice Cantley at the Old Bailey in 1977, during the Judge’s speech when sentencing the terrorists: “I want to commend the men of true worth, unarmed policemen who faced and chased these criminals, and the bomb disposal experts such as Major Biddle”. Major Biddle was awarded the George Medal for his “outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty” in defusing four terrorist bombs, on January 5 & 6, 1974, May 19, 1974 and November 9, 1975. The announcement and citation for his George Medal appeared in the Third Supplement to the London Gazette 47085 of Monday, December 6, 1976, on Tuesday, December 7, 1976, page 16447-48: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. THE QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following award of the George Medal. Awarded the George Medal Major Geoffrey William BIDDLE, M. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police. Bearing in mind police warnings to be cautious of explosives attached to stationery vehicles, they looked under their car and saw a duffle bag jammed underneath below the front passenger seat. Without interfering with the bag they called the police. Major Biddle was summoned to the scene which had been sealed to traffic and pedestrians and after the initial examination it was decided that the residents of nearby houses should be evacuated before the bag was examined in more detail. There was only a small amount of ground clearance under the car and Major Biddle could see that the tightly wedged object was securely closed by a cord. Being unable to touch the bag he tackled the inspection by lying in the gutter, but because of background noises was unable to decide whether or not the bomb was ticking. Major Biddle slowly pivotted the device so that the opening was facing where he was lying in the gutter; this had to be done very gently so that the pressure contact between the bag and the vehicle remained unbroken. When the bag was close enough he managed to cut the cord, open the bag and this enabled him to disarm the device sufficiently to pull it from under the car and render it completely safe. The bomb would have detonated if the bag had been removed or if the car had been subjected to any movement. Major Biddle has over a period been involved in defusing other terrorist explosive devices. On 5th January 1974 following a day of terrorist bomb activity, he was called to some premises where the area had been evacuated following the discovery of a suspicious object. The device had been placed among several plastic bags in a badly lit position and was seen to contain a clock, batteries and explosives. Major Biddle defused the bomb by cutting the wiring to the batteries and then removed the detonator. He then managed to reach the clock, the setting of which showed that the device was probably within seconds of exploding at the time it was disarmed. In the early hours of the following day, 6th January 1974, Major Biddle was called to the front basement of a house where a suitcase had been left on the doorstep; he noticed that the street lighting was extinguished and the area was in darkness. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope and due to a lack of room in which to work, Major Biddle was obliged to move it from its original position. When the case was opened it was found to contain explosives, a battery and a clock. The bomb was made safe by disconnecting the wire to the battery and removing the detonator. Had this bomb exploded considerable damage and injury could have been caused. Major Biddle also defused a bomb contained in a haversack and left at the rear of some premises on 19th May 1974. Major Biddle displayed outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty in tackling these highly dangerous devices, often under difficult circumstances. Biddle’s George Medal investiture took place at Buckingham Palace and was conducted by Prince Charles, on Tuesday, February 15, 1977. It was also the Prince’s first time conducting an investiture. Biddle is acknowledged as having been an MBE and having received the award in 1976 on the Metropolitan Police Gallantry Awards website, for having defused four terrorist bombs during his work as an Explosives Officer. He retired from policing in 1981. Geoffrey William Biddle died in February 1997 in South East Surrey, Surrey, England, at the age of 79. His wife, Lilian, pre-deceased him in 1987. Sir Edward Heath fondly remembered Biddle after his death, stating: Men such as Geoffrey Biddle are too often the unsung heroes of out time, but the freedom we enjoy in our everyday lives depend upon such very special men. I personally owed him a particular debt of thanks because he once showed incredible sang-froid (from the French: cold blood) in defusing a bomb, which turned out to be the first of a new type of device, outside my own home in London. Geoffrey Biddle was an inspiring Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard while the Troubles were at their height, and he will truly be missed. The Set is Accompanied by his Commission Document named to “Geoffrey William Biddle, Lieutenant, Land Forces”, promoting him to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947, dated May 9, 1947 at St. James Palace, stamped signature of George VI, two other signatures, embossed seal of Princess Elizabeth, 303 mm x 407 mm; his Second World War Soldier’s Service and Pay Book (handwritten entries, 100 mm x 127 mm, wear evident on the cover); a Letter from the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, St. James Palace addressed to Major Geoffery William Biddle, M. “, in regards to the Secretary transmitting a Warrant of Appointment to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 198 mm x 238 mm; a Letter from the Metropolitan Police (dated October 15, 1980, with attached letter received from the West German Embassy dated October 10, 1980, 210 mm x 297 mm); a NATO Pass numbered “818, with an expiry date of June 30, 1960 in French, signed by Major Biddle U. Delegation and NATO Head of Security Service, 78 mm x 110 mm; a New Scotland Yard C7 Branch Athletic & Social Club Membership Card (numbered “102″, signed by the Honourary Secretary of the Club, 60 mm x 92 mm); a Special Forces Club Membership Card named to G. Biddle”, dated October 1979/80, signed by the Club Secretary, 59 mm x 80 mm; two The Snowball Club Ladies’ Night For Charity Tickets (numbered “254″ and “255, 114 mm x 150 mm); forty-four Photographs (black and white or colour, two portraits in uniform, three in the field, the remaining photos of friends, family and award ceremonies, various sizes); numerous newspaper articles c. 1970s; thirty business cards (most of which are card-mounted), along with assorted research papers. This medal group would be perfect for medal dealers, rare medal group collectors, bomb disposal, police collectors, museums, displays, christmas gift and much much more! The item “Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group” is in sale since Monday, December 3, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Featured Refinements: Medal Group
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Modified Item: Yes
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Service: Home Front/ Civil Defence
  • Modification Description: George Medal is a Museum Quality Replica
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

Ww11 Australian Service Medal Wx 2987 Foster Sydney George 2/16 Batt K. I. A 1941

M TO WX 2987 FOSTER SYDNEY GEORGE OF 2/16 BATT. A 13 JUNE 1941, SYRIA PROBABLY AT THE BATTLE OF SIDON, WHICH WAS FOUGHT ON THIS DATE AGAINST VICHEY FRENCH FORCES. M ARE WHAT WOULD HAVE RESEMBLED THE REMAINDER OF THE GROUP ENTITLEMENTS, THE 1939-45 STAR, AFRICA STAR, DEFENCE MEDAL AND B. M ALL UNNAMED, ORIGINAL AS ISSUED. THE PURPOSE OF THIS IS FOR DISPLAY. The item “WW11 AUSTRALIAN SERVICE MEDAL WX 2987 FOSTER SYDNEY GEORGE 2/16 BATT K. I. A 1941″ is in sale since Thursday, July 5, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1939 – 1945 (WWII)”. The seller is “specklehead1″ and is located in Pinjarra, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Era: 1940s
  • Country: Australia
  • Authenticity: Original