Posts tagged gallantry

1920′s WEIMAR ERA WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 1ST CLASS MEDAL FOR COMBAT GALLANTRY

1920's WEIMAR ERA WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 1ST CLASS MEDAL FOR COMBAT GALLANTRY

1920's WEIMAR ERA WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 1ST CLASS MEDAL FOR COMBAT GALLANTRY

1920's WEIMAR ERA WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 1ST CLASS MEDAL FOR COMBAT GALLANTRY

Offered is an original 1920′s made WW1 German Iron Cross 1st Class. 42 mm wide white metal cross pattée with magnetic core, slightly vaulted, with a blackened cross pattée within a polished silver hatched border imposed, showing brass base polished through, the face with a central W (for Wilhelm), a crown above, the date 1914 below; the enamel to face showing some wear from use. The reverse plain, showing pin and hooked to rear, non marked light weight jeweller made piece. This is a classic 1920′s Weimar era made cross for First World War recipients. The Iron Cross was instituted on 10 March 1813 by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia during the War of Liberation against the Napoleonic French forces. It is awarded for bravery. In spite of its iconic image and fame, it has always been made of modest materials and issued in relatively large numbers. It was designed by the neo-classical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross of the Teutonic Knights in the late Middle Ages which was also the emblem of Frederick the Great. Check out my other items. We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. 2/135 Russell St, Morley, WA. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “1920′s WEIMAR ERA WW1 GERMAN IRON CROSS 1ST CLASS MEDAL FOR COMBAT GALLANTRY” is in sale since Tuesday, May 29, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country: Germany
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Authenticity: Original
  • Era: 1920s

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Here we have a Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group, Very pleasing lovely “triple gallantry” twice mentioned in dispatches ww1 ww2 medal group all issued to a Lt Col William Ivor Bell, consisting of seven medals loose as issued, a cased military cross (unnamed as issued) a 14-15 star medal impressed Capt T W I Bell, R. E, Victory medal and British war medal impressed naming to Major W. Bell, Victory medal has bronze oak leaves on ribbon, WW2 War medal with ribbon un named as issued, Belgian Croix De Guerre cased and a splendid hallmarked Order of the Nile Commander Class with Ribbon and also cased, This fantastic group is worthy of more research and comes with all the research too showing all of Bell’s awards being gazetted, perfect for medal dealers, royal engineer collectors, medal investors, museums, displays, lectures and much much more! The item “Fantastic WW1 WW2 Triple Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group” is in sale since Thursday, April 11, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group

Here we have a Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group, Very pleasing lovely “double gallantry” twice mentioned in dispatches ww1 ww2 medal group all issued to a Lt Col William Ivor Bell, consisting of seven medals loose as issued, a cased military cross (unnamed as issued) a 14-15 star medal impressed Capt T W I Bell, R. E, Victory medal and British war medal impressed naming to Major W. Bell, Victory medal has bronze oak leaves on ribbon, WW2 War medal with ribbon un named as issued, Belgian Croix De Guerre cased and a splendid hallmarked Order of the Nile Commander Class with Ribbon and also cased, This fantastic group is worthy of more research and comes with all the research too showing all of Bell’s awards being gazetted, perfect for medal dealers, royal engineer collectors, medal investors, museums, displays, lectures and much much more! The item “Fantastic WW1 WW2 Double Gallantry Twice MID Lt Col Royal Engineers Medal Group” is in sale since Tuesday, March 12, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Service: Army
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps

A very interesting WW1 Military medal grouping, awarded to a medic in the 134th field ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps. Charles Henrey Searle was born in Dawlish, 1878 and at a young age moved to Exeter. In 1911 he resided in 29 Stuart Road, Heavitree, Exeter with his wife and three children (two girls and a boy). Searle was a printer machinist for the nespaper”Exeter Flying Post”. Newspaper article: Western times 07/09/1917.’Military Medal for Heavltree Man Mrs. Stuart-road, Heavitree, received a letter yesterday from his commanding officer intimating that her husband, Sergt. Had been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct and devotion to duty. What special act was that won for Sergt. Searle this distinction was not stated, either by the O. Or the winner himself in a letter received at the same time, in which the honour was also mentioned. Searle, who was born at Dawlish, came to Exeter an early age. And for 20 years was employed machinist at the office of the late Exeter Flying Post. He left that employment March 1st to join the and three weeks later received his first stripe, the second coming seven weeks later, and the third three months after, while training on Salisbury Plain. Going across the Channel, he reverted corporal, but three months had been restored to his earlier rank, and since being awarded the Military Medal has been made staff-sergeant, an excellent record. Will be interesting recall incident which occurred three months after Sergt. With others, he proceeded a spot where there were many wounded men. One by one his companions collapsed, but Sergt. Searle stuck to his post for nine days and nights Lack rest and sleep then told its tale, and he also collapsed, and a relief party carried himthe last of the original contingentto the rear, where, happily, speedily recovered. Sgt Searle was awarded the M. M for Gallantry, mentioned in the London Gazette on October 17, 1917. Mentioned in the Edinburgh gazette 22 October, 1917. Searle most likely joined the R. C, trained at salisbury plains with a field ambulance and upon travelling overseas to France and Flanders was sent into the 39th division, being drafted into the 134th field ambulance. 134th at this time were suffering heavy casualties as a result of the battle of Messines (June, 1917) and required reinforcements. Shortly after this the 134th field ambulance were present at the battle of Pilckem Ridge and the duration of the third battle of Ypres (Passhendaele, 1917). This would have been around the same time that Searle is mentioned on the letter and subsequently recieving the M. M for gallant conduct and devotion to duty. The event Searle is mentioned in the letter to his wife is a near citation for his M. Searle would have earned the Military medal for gallant conduct at the battle of Passhendaele with the 134th field ambulance. Another member of the 134 F. A recieved a M. M for the battle of Picklem Ridge (Passendaele) for dressing and bringing in wounded. He is gazzeted at the same time as Searle was (Edinburgh Gazette 22October, 1917). A very interesting medal group, the 134th field ambulance aren’t known for recieving a lot of gallantry in France and Flanders. Medals are all correctly impressed. M – 74443 SJT C. SEARLE 134 / F. War and Victory -”74443 A. The medals are Searles full entitlement. Would be worthy of further research. Any questions please feel free to ask. The item “Scarce WW1 Military M. M gallantry medal group 134th F. A RAMC Medical corps” is in sale since Tuesday, February 19, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “kennefergu” and is located in Jedburgh, Borders. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Service: Army
  • Modified Item: No
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps

Here we have a Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps, A fantastic and extremely scarce gallantry medal group for the Battle of Amman in the Jordan Valley. MC Group of 4 awarded to Lieutenant L. Brothers, 2nd Battalion Imperial Camel Corps, late 1st County of London Yeomanry, noted for his “coolness and dash” at Suvla Bay in August 1915, and later awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry during the attack on Amman in March 1918. Comprising of Military Cross, GVR Ammam (sp), Lt. Brothers, Imperial Camel Corps, E. 1918; 1914-15 Star 3333 Sjt. Brothers, the first privately engraved, the second and fourth officially impressed, the British War Medal officially re-impressed, also comes with imperial camel corps book (signed) as well as a extensive research pack. Lt Brothers citation reads. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He organised the defence under a hot enfilade fire with the greatest ability, and when the majority of the men of his forward left-hand gun had been put out of action, he took charge of the gun himself and retained the position all day. As well as a favourable report prior to his commission. Was in command of the advanced troop and did not get the order to retire in time to withdraw with the Regiment so he kept himself together all night reporting himself to Lt. Roller and remaining with him. He went out several times during the night on patrols with messages and Captain Watson reports to me that he acted through the day and night with great coolness and dash. Report by Lt Col. Sir Matthew Wilson, Commanding 1st County of London Yeomanry based on information given by Captain O. Watson, who later was awarded the Victoria Cross. This rare Camel Corps group is still worthy of further detailed unit research, as the recipient may well have met and known T. All perfect for museums, ww1 dealers, collectors, displays, investments, enthusiasts and much much more! The item “Fantastic Very Scarce WW1 MC Gallantry Officer Medal Group Imperial Camel Corps” is in sale since Thursday, January 31, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Service: Army
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

A fine Distinguished Flying Cross GVI, 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France & Germany, Italy star, Defence & War Medals, Police Long and Exemplary Service Medal E2 to Flight Lieutenant Charles Donald Burton, 16 Squadron Royal Air Force a Spitfire Mark XI Pilot and Liverpool Police Force Detective Inspector. Burton was awarded the DFC for daring photographic reconnaissance missions over NW Europe, on one occasion in December 1944 he was jumped by four Me 163 Rocket Propelled fighters, one opening fire on him at 400 yards. Resuming his Police career post War, he retired as a Detective Inspector in1969. Distinguished Flying Cross GVI dated 1945. 1939/45 Star Air Crew Europe Star clasp France & Germany, Italy Star, Defence & War Medals. Police Long and Exemplary Service Medal E2 to Sergt Charles D Burton. With copy London Gazette entry & Headers for DFC, copy recommendation for DFC, original RAF Service & Release Book, some original letters mainly dealing with employment after retirement from the Police, original letter from the Elland Urban District Council congratulating him on being awarded the DFC dated 4 June 1945, Air Council Medal Award slip and entitlement slip shown below, original photo in uniform, copy Police Service certificate awarded on his retirement in March 1969 Served in the Liverpool City Police from 23 January 1939 to 24 March 1969 and numerous original aerial photographs of targets inc more than 50 original photo reconnaissance photo , details of postings from his service record etc. Service Record of C. Charles Donald Burton joined the RAF as an Aircraftsman 2nd Class in October 1941 at the Recruit Centre, London, promoted Leading. Aircraftsman January 1942, Sergeant December 1942, Flight Sergeant December 1943, Pilot Officer February 1944, Flying Officer August. 1944 he trained as a pilot in Canada and joined his first operational Squadron 39 Squadron in October 1943 based at Benson. Based at Ban, Italy in January 1944 he joined 16 Squadron in June 1944. From the Halifax Daily Courier June 2nd, 1945. Flying Officer Charles Donald Burton (26) whose parents Mr & Mrs Wilfred Burton reside at 135 Catherine Street, Elland, it was announced. Yesterday, has also been awarded the DFC. He joined the RAF in October 1941, when a member of the Liverpool Police Detective Force. He made over 80 operational sorties in which the citation states He has displayed commendable skill and determination etc etc. Officer Burton was educated at Elland Grammar School is a well known swimmer, being then associated with the unbeaten Halifax. Squadron team, he is married, his wife residing at Charles Street, Elland. DFC London Gazette 1 June 1945. Recommendation for Honours and Award. Total number of operational hours flying 170, total number of sorties 80. For courage and skill in photographic reconnaissance over NW Europe. Flying Officer Burton has completed a most successful tour, which has included low level sorties over many heavily defended targets. On three sorties he was jumped by enemy fighters but he always succeeded in evading the enemy aircraft and carried on with his task. Once, while taking photographs of Venlo Bridge, his aircraft was hit by Flak and thrown off its course. Flying Officer Burton has always shown his determination to get the best possible results whatever the conditions, often in spite of stiff opposition and difficult weather. This officers work has been of consistently high quality throughout. He has always shown keenness to attempt the more difficult tasks and has always carried them through with commendable skill and determination regardless of opposition. His work and his example have played an important part in the work of his Squadron. From Personal Combat Report 8 December 1944 whilst flying a Spitfire Mark XX. Time up 11:25 time down 13:20 attacked at 30,000 feet NW of Koin at approx Butzweiler. I was on a photo reconnaissance sortie flying over Leverkusen. At 30,000 feet on a course of 340 degrees, I saw 4 ME 163s climbing out of cloud at 6,000 feet on my port side. I altered course to 270 degrees and they climbed very rapidly and passed overhead. At that moment I decided to look round and saw 1 ME 163 making a glide attack from the starboard astern and from above. I turned sharply to starboard and the enemy aircraft passed underneath me. When I first saw him the enemy aircraft was 400 yards away and had opened fire, the tracer passing behind. It appeared to be from one 20 or 30 mm cannon. The first four had then turned to port. I turned to port and, loosing height to 20,000 feet made back to base. No further attacks were made. Before this encounter I had been circling the Cologne area for approx 20 minutes, waiting for a gap in the cloud over my target. If you have any questions and require more images please late us know. The item “WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group” is in sale since Wednesday, January 23, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “decathlon7647″ and is located in caulfield. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Here we have a Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group, Major Biddle served in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Metropolitan Police Force and Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, He was awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Member (Civil) (frosted silver, oak leaf cluster for gallantry on the ribbon) rare as this was the last year it was issued before being replaced by the Queens Gallantry Medal. Naming is officially impressed on the GSM, the George Medal is a replica as the original is in possession of the family, the other three awards are un-named as issued. Mounted to a suspension with swing bar pinback, replacement ribbons, light contact, near extremely fine. Geoffrey William Biddle was born on May 7, 1917 in Bromley, Kent, England. Biddle enlisted as a Private (7664096) with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps at Brighton, East Sussex on March 5, 1940, in the RAOC he became Ammunition Examiner on May 30, 1942. He was promoted to Acting Staff Sergeant on June 4, 1943 and to Staff Sergeant on December 1, 1943. He was awarded four service chevrons on March 5, 1944 and attended the 29th Regimental Sergeant Majors’ Course at Leicester three months later, on June 1st. He achieved the ranks of Warrant Officer 2nd Class (Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant) on December 28, 1944 and Warrant Officer 1st Class (Sergeant Commander) on November 14, 1945, before being promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947. After the war, Biddle was commissioned as an Ammunition Technical Officer and served in Germany, Kenya, Cyprus and the Middle East, and was later promoted to Captain. While still with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Captain G. Biddle (366892) was promoted to the rank of Major, effective August 6, 1959, the announcement appearing in the Supplement to the London Gazette 41782 of Tuesday, August 4, 1959, on Friday, August 7, 1959, page 4917. One of his last tasks as an Army officer was to deal with a parcel marked “Explosives” on an Underground (subway) train near Mansion House. It turned out to be a hoax. Biddle retired from the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1964 with the rank of Major. In November 1964, he joined the Metropolitan Police Force in London. By 1964, the Metropolitan Police Force was facing a wave of safe-blowings using gelignite or nitro-glycerine. Explosives left at the scene of bungled robberies had to be made safe and recovered, with Major Donald Henderson advising officers on scene management and evidence collection. Henderson impressed the senior officers so much that he was asked to set up a bomb disposal unit. Now also retired from the Army, Major Henderson, with his friend and colleague, the now retired Army officer Major Geoffrey Biddle, became police explosives officers at the Explosives Office at Cannon Row police station, establishing C7 (2) Branch and became experts in the field. Their early work paved the way for police anti-terrorist operations throughout the 1970s. Both were part of the close-knit civilian team who responded to the Provisional IRA’s mainland bombing campaign, and the Arab attacks later that decade. The Explosives Office was visited by delegates from all over the world, and the procedures Henderson had established were copied widely. Major Biddle was later named Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard and he was no stranger to unpredictable terrorist devices. In March 1973, he had rendered harmless the first IRA (Irish Republican Army) car bomb in London, outside New Scotland Yard itself. On the same day, two bombs, one at the Old Bailey and the other at the Ministry of Agriculture, killed one man and injured more than 200 others. In court later that year, Biddle produced a small black wooden box which had contained the timing mechanism for the 175-pound bomb. Biddle had opened the door of the car, a Ford Corsair, noting the pungent smell of explosives and spotted a white wire running under the carpet leading to a large charge under the rear seat. Biddle agreed with the judge, Mr. Justice Sebag Shaw, that it could have been fitted with a booby trap. Asked how he knew the bomb was not fitted as such, Biddle replied It’s a matter of intuition and er… “, the Judge adding “And hope? “, with Biddle confirming “And hope. Before Biddle left the witness box, the Judge said: “I would like to pay tribute to your courage”. Later that year, Major Biddle was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, along with two others, the announcement and citation appearing in the Second Supplement to the London Gazette 46156 of Monday, December 17, 1973, on Tuesday, December 18, 1973, page 15033-34: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. James’s Palace, London S. The QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the undermentioned appointments to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, and to approve the awards of the George Medal and the British Empire Medal for Gallantry (Civil Division) and for the publication in the London Gazette of the names of those specially shown below as having received an expression of Commendation for Brave Conduct. To be additional Members of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for Gallantry: Major Geoffrey William Biddle, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Captain Richard Vernon Hawkins, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Peter Edwin Spencer Gurney, G. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Following a report that a suspicious car was parked near two buildings which had wide areas of glass in their walls and housed large numbers of staff, Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney went to the scene. Quickly realizing the gravity of the situation they managed to get into the car and immediately recognised the smell of explosives. They saw a cord protruding from beneath the passenger seat which they knew was a detonating cord and this was traced to the rear seat which was lifted and found to be packed with explosives. They now realised they were dealing with a very large bomb and ensured that the immediate area was evacuated and that staff in the surrounding buildings were warned before they began the dangerous task of rendering the device safe. The officers found the initiatory system of the bomb in a wooden box under the front seat; Mr. Gurney severed the detonating cord and together they removed the back seat containing the explosives as far as possible from the initiatory system. They suspected that there might be a second such system and immediately unpacked the seat squab and separated the bags of explosives to reduce the effects of any explosion. When the box was opened it was found to contain a device based on an alarm clock which would have exploded the bomb at 3 p. The car was then searched for further explosives and none being found, it was declared safe. During the morning Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney with other colleagues were extremely busy attending to further suspect car bombs; these turned out to be false alarms. At about 2 p. That afternoon an anonymous call to a newspaper warned that further car bombs had been planted and Mr. Gurney with Captain Hawkins went to deal with one of them. From the earlier events of the day they realised that the time for the detonation of any further bombs might be perilously close and they immediately approached the car and gained access. Again they were met by the distinctive smell of explosives and rapidly located a detonating cord in a position like the one found previously. The bomb was similar to the earlier one and having cut the detonating cord they removed the rear seat squab. Captain Hawkins carefully dismantled the explosive charge and made certain it contained no secondary means of detonation while Mr. Gurney made the initiatory device safe; this was again found to be based on an alarm clock and would have caused the bomb to explode at about 2.50 p. Together the officers searched the car for any further explosives and finally declared it safe. Major Biddle, Captain Hawkins and Mr. Gurney were all involved in exceptional risks and displayed courage of a very high order and in successfully dismantling these bombs they undoubtedly saved a large number of people from very serious injury or even death. The month after the announcement of his award of the MBE, in early January 1974, Major Biddle and Major Ronald Wilson, a fellow officer from the Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, were called to five incidents in two days. One bomb went off at Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum while Wilson was collecting tools to deal with it, while Biddle was called to another incident at the Boat Show at Earl’s Court. The bomb there went off while he was on the way to deal with it, but meanwhile he was summoned to defuse another device in Ealing, west London. Inside a large plastic carrier bag, he found a 15-pound bomb in a corrugated box stamped with the name of a Dublin firm of biscuit manufacturers. Biddle recalled the incident: I was alone. This is a one-man task. I could hear a distinct ticking sound. I proceeded immediately to defuse the bomb. Only after dismantling it, did Biddle discover a clock hand on its timing device was only thirty seconds from making contact with a brass screw that would have set off an explosion. In the early hours on the next day, Biddle was called to two other incidents: one bomb in Chelsea blew up before he could reach it, the other bomb was in Kensington, in a gray-mottled suitcase that could be seen on the doorstep of the basement of a house occupied by Major-General Sir Cecil Blacker, Adjutant-General. The street lighting had been extinguished. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope, and because of the lack of space in which to work, Biddle was obliged to move it. Inside the case, he found 112 four-ounce gelignite cartridges and was able to dismantle the bomb by undoing battery connections. At the trial of the IRA men sentenced for the bombings, Mr, Justice Melford Stevenson praised both Biddle and Wilson for their efforts. Much of Biddle’s work was carried out in secrecy, but in 1975, a court heard how a bomb sent by a jilted lover blew up in his face, scorching his wrist and eyebrows. He is credited with having defused numerous terrorist bombs, including an IRA device intended to kill Sir Edward Heath in 1975. Heath had been a British politician, who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and was the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975, losing the leadership of the party to Margaret Thatcher in February 1975. On November 9, 1975, Biddle had been called out in the early hours, to deal with a car parked by Heath’s house in Belgravia. Under the car was a duffel bag, so all local residents were evacuated. From where Biddel lay in the gutter, he could see that the bag was wedged fast under the car and tied with a cord. Due to the background noise, he could not hear if it was ticking. Biddle pivoted the bag, so that its open end faced him in the gutter. He had to ensure that the pressure contact between the bag and the car was maintained. Reaching under the car, he managed to cut the cord and open the bag wide enough to dismantle the bomb. Biddle was praised for his efforts by Mr. Justice Cantley at the Old Bailey in 1977, during the Judge’s speech when sentencing the terrorists: “I want to commend the men of true worth, unarmed policemen who faced and chased these criminals, and the bomb disposal experts such as Major Biddle”. Major Biddle was awarded the George Medal for his “outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty” in defusing four terrorist bombs, on January 5 & 6, 1974, May 19, 1974 and November 9, 1975. The announcement and citation for his George Medal appeared in the Third Supplement to the London Gazette 47085 of Monday, December 6, 1976, on Tuesday, December 7, 1976, page 16447-48: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. THE QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following award of the George Medal. Awarded the George Medal Major Geoffrey William BIDDLE, M. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police. Bearing in mind police warnings to be cautious of explosives attached to stationery vehicles, they looked under their car and saw a duffle bag jammed underneath below the front passenger seat. Without interfering with the bag they called the police. Major Biddle was summoned to the scene which had been sealed to traffic and pedestrians and after the initial examination it was decided that the residents of nearby houses should be evacuated before the bag was examined in more detail. There was only a small amount of ground clearance under the car and Major Biddle could see that the tightly wedged object was securely closed by a cord. Being unable to touch the bag he tackled the inspection by lying in the gutter, but because of background noises was unable to decide whether or not the bomb was ticking. Major Biddle slowly pivotted the device so that the opening was facing where he was lying in the gutter; this had to be done very gently so that the pressure contact between the bag and the vehicle remained unbroken. When the bag was close enough he managed to cut the cord, open the bag and this enabled him to disarm the device sufficiently to pull it from under the car and render it completely safe. The bomb would have detonated if the bag had been removed or if the car had been subjected to any movement. Major Biddle has over a period been involved in defusing other terrorist explosive devices. On 5th January 1974 following a day of terrorist bomb activity, he was called to some premises where the area had been evacuated following the discovery of a suspicious object. The device had been placed among several plastic bags in a badly lit position and was seen to contain a clock, batteries and explosives. Major Biddle defused the bomb by cutting the wiring to the batteries and then removed the detonator. He then managed to reach the clock, the setting of which showed that the device was probably within seconds of exploding at the time it was disarmed. In the early hours of the following day, 6th January 1974, Major Biddle was called to the front basement of a house where a suitcase had been left on the doorstep; he noticed that the street lighting was extinguished and the area was in darkness. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope and due to a lack of room in which to work, Major Biddle was obliged to move it from its original position. When the case was opened it was found to contain explosives, a battery and a clock. The bomb was made safe by disconnecting the wire to the battery and removing the detonator. Had this bomb exploded considerable damage and injury could have been caused. Major Biddle also defused a bomb contained in a haversack and left at the rear of some premises on 19th May 1974. Major Biddle displayed outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty in tackling these highly dangerous devices, often under difficult circumstances. Biddle’s George Medal investiture took place at Buckingham Palace and was conducted by Prince Charles, on Tuesday, February 15, 1977. It was also the Prince’s first time conducting an investiture. Biddle is acknowledged as having been an MBE and having received the award in 1976 on the Metropolitan Police Gallantry Awards website, for having defused four terrorist bombs during his work as an Explosives Officer. He retired from policing in 1981. Geoffrey William Biddle died in February 1997 in South East Surrey, Surrey, England, at the age of 79. His wife, Lilian, pre-deceased him in 1987. Sir Edward Heath fondly remembered Biddle after his death, stating: Men such as Geoffrey Biddle are too often the unsung heroes of out time, but the freedom we enjoy in our everyday lives depend upon such very special men. I personally owed him a particular debt of thanks because he once showed incredible sang-froid (from the French: cold blood) in defusing a bomb, which turned out to be the first of a new type of device, outside my own home in London. Geoffrey Biddle was an inspiring Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard while the Troubles were at their height, and he will truly be missed. ” (C:106) The Set is Accompanied by his Commission Document named to “Geoffrey William Biddle, Lieutenant, Land Forces, promoting him to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947, dated May 9, 1947 at St. James Palace, stamped signature of George VI, two other signatures, embossed seal of Princess Elizabeth, 303 mm x 407 mm; his Second World War Soldier’s Service and Pay Book (handwritten entries, 100 mm x 127 mm, wear evident on the cover); a Letter from the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, St. James Palace addressed to Major Geoffery William Biddle, M. “, in regards to the Secretary transmitting a Warrant of Appointment to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 198 mm x 238 mm; a Letter from the Metropolitan Police (dated October 15, 1980, with attached letter received from the West German Embassy dated October 10, 1980, 210 mm x 297 mm); a NATO Pass numbered “818, with an expiry date of June 30, 1960 in French, signed by Major Biddle U. Delegation and NATO Head of Security Service, 78 mm x 110 mm; a New Scotland Yard C7 Branch Athletic & Social Club Membership Card (numbered “102″, signed by the Honourary Secretary of the Club, 60 mm x 92 mm); a Special Forces Club Membership Card named to G. Biddle”, dated October 1979/80, signed by the Club Secretary, 59 mm x 80 mm; two The Snowball Club Ladies’ Night For Charity Tickets (numbered “254″ and “255, 114 mm x 150 mm); forty-four Photographs (black and white or colour, two portraits in uniform, three in the field, the remaining photos of friends, family and award ceremonies, various sizes); numerous newspaper articles c. 1970s; thirty business cards (most of which are card-mounted), along with assorted research papers. This medal group would be perfect for medal dealers, rare medal group collectors, bomb disposal, police collectors, museums, displays, christmas gift and much much more! The item “Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group” is in sale since Sunday, January 13, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Service: Home Front/ Civil Defence
  • Modified Item: Yes
  • Featured Refinements: Medal Group
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Modification Description: George Medal is a Museum Quality Replica
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group

A fine Distinguished Flying Cross GVI, 1939/45 Star, Air Crew Europe Star clasp France & Germany, Italy star, Defence & War Medals, Police Long and Exemplary Service Medal E2 to Flight Lieutenant Charles Donald Burton, 16 Squadron Royal Air Force a Spitfire Mark XI Pilot and Liverpool Police Force Detective Inspector. Burton was awarded the DFC for daring photographic reconnaissance missions over NW Europe, on one occasion in December 1944 he was jumped by four Me 163 Rocket Propelled fighters, one opening fire on him at 400 yards. Resuming his Police career post War, he retired as a Detective Inspector in1969. Distinguished Flying Cross GVI dated 1945. 1939/45 Star Air Crew Europe Star clasp France & Germany, Italy Star, Defence & War Medals. Police Long and Exemplary Service Medal E2 to Sergt Charles D Burton. With copy London Gazette entry & Headers for DFC, copy recommendation for DFC, original RAF Service & Release Book, some original letters mainly dealing with employment after retirement from the Police, original letter from the Elland Urban District Council congratulating him on being awarded the DFC dated 4 June 1945, Air Council Medal Award slip and entitlement slip shown below, original photo in uniform, copy Police Service certificate awarded on his retirement in March 1969 Served in the Liverpool City Police from 23 January 1939 to 24 March 1969 and numerous original aerial photographs of targets inc more than 50 original photo reconnaissance photo , details of postings from his service record etc. Service Record of C. Charles Donald Burton joined the RAF as an Aircraftsman 2nd Class in October 1941 at the Recruit Centre, London, promoted Leading. Aircraftsman January 1942, Sergeant December 1942, Flight Sergeant December 1943, Pilot Officer February 1944, Flying Officer August. 1944 he trained as a pilot in Canada and joined his first operational Squadron 39 Squadron in October 1943 based at Benson. Based at Ban, Italy in January 1944 he joined 16 Squadron in June 1944. From the Halifax Daily Courier June 2nd, 1945. Flying Officer Charles Donald Burton (26) whose parents Mr & Mrs Wilfred Burton reside at 135 Catherine Street, Elland, it was announced. Yesterday, has also been awarded the DFC. He joined the RAF in October 1941, when a member of the Liverpool Police Detective Force. He made over 80 operational sorties in which the citation states He has displayed commendable skill and determination etc etc. Officer Burton was educated at Elland Grammar School is a well known swimmer, being then associated with the unbeaten Halifax. Squadron team, he is married, his wife residing at Charles Street, Elland. DFC London Gazette 1 June 1945. Recommendation for Honours and Award. Total number of operational hours flying 170, total number of sorties 80. For courage and skill in photographic reconnaissance over NW Europe. Flying Officer Burton has completed a most successful tour, which has included low level sorties over many heavily defended targets. On three sorties he was jumped by enemy fighters but he always succeeded in evading the enemy aircraft and carried on with his task. Once, while taking photographs of Venlo Bridge, his aircraft was hit by Flak and thrown off its course. Flying Officer Burton has always shown his determination to get the best possible results whatever the conditions, often in spite of stiff opposition and difficult weather. This officers work has been of consistently high quality throughout. He has always shown keenness to attempt the more difficult tasks and has always carried them through with commendable skill and determination regardless of opposition. His work and his example have played an important part in the work of his Squadron. From Personal Combat Report 8 December 1944 whilst flying a Spitfire Mark XX. Time up 11:25 time down 13:20 attacked at 30,000 feet NW of Koin at approx Butzweiler. I was on a photo reconnaissance sortie flying over Leverkusen. At 30,000 feet on a course of 340 degrees, I saw 4 ME 163s climbing out of cloud at 6,000 feet on my port side. I altered course to 270 degrees and they climbed very rapidly and passed overhead. At that moment I decided to look round and saw 1 ME 163 making a glide attack from the starboard astern and from above. I turned sharply to starboard and the enemy aircraft passed underneath me. When I first saw him the enemy aircraft was 400 yards away and had opened fire, the tracer passing behind. It appeared to be from one 20 or 30 mm cannon. The first four had then turned to port. I turned to port and, loosing height to 20,000 feet made back to base. No further attacks were made. Before this encounter I had been circling the Cologne area for approx 20 minutes, waiting for a gap in the cloud over my target. If you have any questions and require more images please late us know. The item “WW2 RAF MEDAL DFC DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS GALLANTRY AWARD Group” is in sale since Sunday, December 23, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “decathlon7647″ and is located in caulfield. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued

This is an original and authentic medal and i honestly believe every single medal ever awarded deserves the utmost respect and particularly any awarded to the RAF who all went above and beyond. As Winston Churchill once said. Churchill apparently first used his famous words upon his exit from the. Battle of Britain Bunker. On 16 August when visiting the. Operations Room during a day of battle.’Don’t speak to me, I have never been so moved’. After several minutes of silence he said,’Never in the history of mankind has so much been owed by so many to so few’. The sentence would form the basis of his speech to the. The Wiki page for more info on the cross. The cross is in Excellent condition as seen with NO damages and the ribbon is original and just a little grubby. Is an absolute must for any collection and displays really really well. The item “Original WW2 DFC Distinguished Flying Cross Gallantry Medal Unamed as Issued” is in sale since Monday, December 17, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “dainsy66″ and is located in South Shields. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Service: Air Force
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group

Here we have a Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group, Major Biddle served in the. Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Metropolitan Police Force and Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, He was awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Member (Civil) (frosted silver, oak leaf cluster for gallantry on the ribbon) rare as this was the last year it was issued before being replaced by the Queens Gallantry Medal. Naming is officially impressed on the GSM, the George Medal is a replica as the original is in possession of the family, the other three awards are un-named as issued. Mounted to a suspension with swing bar pinback, replacement ribbons, light contact, near extremely fine. Geoffrey William Biddle was born on May 7, 1917 in Bromley, Kent, England. Biddle enlisted as a Private (7664096) with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps at Brighton, East Sussex on March 5, 1940, in the RAOC he became Ammunition Examiner on May 30, 1942. He was promoted to Acting Staff Sergeant on June 4, 1943 and to Staff Sergeant on December 1, 1943. He was awarded four service chevrons on March 5, 1944 and attended the 29th Regimental Sergeant Majors’ Course at Leicester three months later, on June 1st. He achieved the ranks of Warrant Officer 2nd Class (Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant) on December 28, 1944 and Warrant Officer 1st Class (Sergeant Commander) on November 14, 1945, before being promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947. After the war, Biddle was commissioned as an Ammunition Technical Officer and served in Germany, Kenya, Cyprus and the Middle East, and was later promoted to Captain. While still with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Captain G. Biddle (366892) was promoted to the rank of Major, effective August 6, 1959, the announcement appearing in the Supplement to the London Gazette 41782 of Tuesday, August 4, 1959, on Friday, August 7, 1959, page 4917. One of his last tasks as an Army officer was to deal with a parcel marked “Explosives” on an Underground (subway) train near Mansion House. It turned out to be a hoax. Biddle retired from the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1964 with the rank of Major. In November 1964, he joined the Metropolitan Police Force in London. By 1964, the Metropolitan Police Force was facing a wave of safe-blowings using gelignite or nitro-glycerine. Explosives left at the scene of bungled robberies had to be made safe and recovered, with Major Donald Henderson advising officers on scene management and evidence collection. Henderson impressed the senior officers so much that he was asked to set up a bomb disposal unit. Now also retired from the Army, Major Henderson, with his friend and colleague, the now retired Army officer Major Geoffrey Biddle, became police explosives officers at the Explosives Office at Cannon Row police station, establishing C7 (2) Branch and became experts in the field. Their early work paved the way for police anti-terrorist operations throughout the 1970s. Both were part of the close-knit civilian team who responded to the Provisional IRA’s mainland bombing campaign, and the Arab attacks later that decade. The Explosives Office was visited by delegates from all over the world, and the procedures Henderson had established were copied widely. Major Biddle was later named Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard and he was no stranger to unpredictable terrorist devices. In March 1973, he had rendered harmless the first IRA (Irish Republican Army) car bomb in London, outside New Scotland Yard itself. On the same day, two bombs, one at the Old Bailey and the other at the Ministry of Agriculture, killed one man and injured more than 200 others. In court later that year, Biddle produced a small black wooden box which had contained the timing mechanism for the 175-pound bomb. Biddle had opened the door of the car, a Ford Corsair, noting the pungent smell of explosives and spotted a white wire running under the carpet leading to a large charge under the rear seat. Biddle agreed with the judge, Mr. Justice Sebag Shaw, that it could have been fitted with a booby trap. Asked how he knew the bomb was not fitted as such, Biddle replied It’s a matter of intuition and er… “, the Judge adding “And hope? “, with Biddle confirming “And hope. Before Biddle left the witness box, the Judge said: “I would like to pay tribute to your courage”. Later that year, Major Biddle was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, along with two others, the announcement and citation appearing in the Second Supplement to the London Gazette 46156 of Monday, December 17, 1973, on Tuesday, December 18, 1973, page 15033-34: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. James’s Palace, London S. The QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the undermentioned appointments to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, and to approve the awards of the George Medal and the British Empire Medal for Gallantry (Civil Division) and for the publication in the London Gazette of the names of those specially shown below as having received an expression of Commendation for Brave Conduct. To be additional Members of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for Gallantry: Major Geoffrey William Biddle, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Captain Richard Vernon Hawkins, Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Peter Edwin Spencer Gurney, G. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police Office. Following a report that a suspicious car was parked near two buildings which had wide areas of glass in their walls and housed large numbers of staff, Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney went to the scene. Quickly realizing the gravity of the situation they managed to get into the car and immediately recognised the smell of explosives. They saw a cord protruding from beneath the passenger seat which they knew was a detonating cord and this was traced to the rear seat which was lifted and found to be packed with explosives. They now realised they were dealing with a very large bomb and ensured that the immediate area was evacuated and that staff in the surrounding buildings were warned before they began the dangerous task of rendering the device safe. The officers found the initiatory system of the bomb in a wooden box under the front seat; Mr. Gurney severed the detonating cord and together they removed the back seat containing the explosives as far as possible from the initiatory system. They suspected that there might be a second such system and immediately unpacked the seat squab and separated the bags of explosives to reduce the effects of any explosion. When the box was opened it was found to contain a device based on an alarm clock which would have exploded the bomb at 3 p. The car was then searched for further explosives and none being found, it was declared safe. During the morning Major Biddle and Mr. Gurney with other colleagues were extremely busy attending to further suspect car bombs; these turned out to be false alarms. At about 2 p. That afternoon an anonymous call to a newspaper warned that further car bombs had been planted and Mr. Gurney with Captain Hawkins went to deal with one of them. From the earlier events of the day they realised that the time for the detonation of any further bombs might be perilously close and they immediately approached the car and gained access. Again they were met by the distinctive smell of explosives and rapidly located a detonating cord in a position like the one found previously. The bomb was similar to the earlier one and having cut the detonating cord they removed the rear seat squab. Captain Hawkins carefully dismantled the explosive charge and made certain it contained no secondary means of detonation while Mr. Gurney made the initiatory device safe; this was again found to be based on an alarm clock and would have caused the bomb to explode at about 2.50 p. Together the officers searched the car for any further explosives and finally declared it safe. Major Biddle, Captain Hawkins and Mr. Gurney were all involved in exceptional risks and displayed courage of a very high order and in successfully dismantling these bombs they undoubtedly saved a large number of people from very serious injury or even death. The month after the announcement of his award of the MBE, in early January 1974, Major Biddle and Major Ronald Wilson, a fellow officer from the Scotland Yard Bomb Squad, were called to five incidents in two days. One bomb went off at Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum while Wilson was collecting tools to deal with it, while Biddle was called to another incident at the Boat Show at Earl’s Court. The bomb there went off while he was on the way to deal with it, but meanwhile he was summoned to defuse another device in Ealing, west London. Inside a large plastic carrier bag, he found a 15-pound bomb in a corrugated box stamped with the name of a Dublin firm of biscuit manufacturers. Biddle recalled the incident: I was alone. This is a one-man task. I could hear a distinct ticking sound. I proceeded immediately to defuse the bomb. Only after dismantling it, did Biddle discover a clock hand on its timing device was only thirty seconds from making contact with a brass screw that would have set off an explosion. In the early hours on the next day, Biddle was called to two other incidents: one bomb in Chelsea blew up before he could reach it, the other bomb was in Kensington, in a gray-mottled suitcase that could be seen on the doorstep of the basement of a house occupied by Major-General Sir Cecil Blacker, Adjutant-General. The street lighting had been extinguished. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope, and because of the lack of space in which to work, Biddle was obliged to move it. Inside the case, he found 112 four-ounce gelignite cartridges and was able to dismantle the bomb by undoing battery connections. At the trial of the IRA men sentenced for the bombings, Mr, Justice Melford Stevenson praised both Biddle and Wilson for their efforts. Much of Biddle’s work was carried out in secrecy, but in 1975, a court heard how a bomb sent by a jilted lover blew up in his face, scorching his wrist and eyebrows. He is credited with having defused numerous terrorist bombs, including an IRA device intended to kill Sir Edward Heath in 1975. Heath had been a British politician, who served as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and was the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975, losing the leadership of the party to Margaret Thatcher in February 1975. On November 9, 1975, Biddle had been called out in the early hours, to deal with a car parked by Heath’s house in Belgravia. Under the car was a duffel bag, so all local residents were evacuated. From where Biddel lay in the gutter, he could see that the bag was wedged fast under the car and tied with a cord. Due to the background noise, he could not hear if it was ticking. Biddle pivoted the bag, so that its open end faced him in the gutter. He had to ensure that the pressure contact between the bag and the car was maintained. Reaching under the car, he managed to cut the cord and open the bag wide enough to dismantle the bomb. Biddle was praised for his efforts by Mr. Justice Cantley at the Old Bailey in 1977, during the Judge’s speech when sentencing the terrorists: “I want to commend the men of true worth, unarmed policemen who faced and chased these criminals, and the bomb disposal experts such as Major Biddle”. Major Biddle was awarded the George Medal for his “outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty” in defusing four terrorist bombs, on January 5 & 6, 1974, May 19, 1974 and November 9, 1975. The announcement and citation for his George Medal appeared in the Third Supplement to the London Gazette 47085 of Monday, December 6, 1976, on Tuesday, December 7, 1976, page 16447-48: CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD St. THE QUEEN has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following award of the George Medal. Awarded the George Medal Major Geoffrey William BIDDLE, M. Explosives Officer, Metropolitan Police. Bearing in mind police warnings to be cautious of explosives attached to stationery vehicles, they looked under their car and saw a duffle bag jammed underneath below the front passenger seat. Without interfering with the bag they called the police. Major Biddle was summoned to the scene which had been sealed to traffic and pedestrians and after the initial examination it was decided that the residents of nearby houses should be evacuated before the bag was examined in more detail. There was only a small amount of ground clearance under the car and Major Biddle could see that the tightly wedged object was securely closed by a cord. Being unable to touch the bag he tackled the inspection by lying in the gutter, but because of background noises was unable to decide whether or not the bomb was ticking. Major Biddle slowly pivotted the device so that the opening was facing where he was lying in the gutter; this had to be done very gently so that the pressure contact between the bag and the vehicle remained unbroken. When the bag was close enough he managed to cut the cord, open the bag and this enabled him to disarm the device sufficiently to pull it from under the car and render it completely safe. The bomb would have detonated if the bag had been removed or if the car had been subjected to any movement. Major Biddle has over a period been involved in defusing other terrorist explosive devices. On 5th January 1974 following a day of terrorist bomb activity, he was called to some premises where the area had been evacuated following the discovery of a suspicious object. The device had been placed among several plastic bags in a badly lit position and was seen to contain a clock, batteries and explosives. Major Biddle defused the bomb by cutting the wiring to the batteries and then removed the detonator. He then managed to reach the clock, the setting of which showed that the device was probably within seconds of exploding at the time it was disarmed. In the early hours of the following day, 6th January 1974, Major Biddle was called to the front basement of a house where a suitcase had been left on the doorstep; he noticed that the street lighting was extinguished and the area was in darkness. The suitcase was bound tightly with rope and due to a lack of room in which to work, Major Biddle was obliged to move it from its original position. When the case was opened it was found to contain explosives, a battery and a clock. The bomb was made safe by disconnecting the wire to the battery and removing the detonator. Had this bomb exploded considerable damage and injury could have been caused. Major Biddle also defused a bomb contained in a haversack and left at the rear of some premises on 19th May 1974. Major Biddle displayed outstanding gallantry and devotion to duty in tackling these highly dangerous devices, often under difficult circumstances. Biddle’s George Medal investiture took place at Buckingham Palace and was conducted by Prince Charles, on Tuesday, February 15, 1977. It was also the Prince’s first time conducting an investiture. Biddle is acknowledged as having been an MBE and having received the award in 1976 on the Metropolitan Police Gallantry Awards website, for having defused four terrorist bombs during his work as an Explosives Officer. He retired from policing in 1981. Geoffrey William Biddle died in February 1997 in South East Surrey, Surrey, England, at the age of 79. His wife, Lilian, pre-deceased him in 1987. Sir Edward Heath fondly remembered Biddle after his death, stating: Men such as Geoffrey Biddle are too often the unsung heroes of out time, but the freedom we enjoy in our everyday lives depend upon such very special men. I personally owed him a particular debt of thanks because he once showed incredible sang-froid (from the French: cold blood) in defusing a bomb, which turned out to be the first of a new type of device, outside my own home in London. Geoffrey Biddle was an inspiring Senior Explosives Officer at Scotland Yard while the Troubles were at their height, and he will truly be missed. The Set is Accompanied by his Commission Document named to “Geoffrey William Biddle, Lieutenant, Land Forces”, promoting him to the rank of Lieutenant, effective January 1, 1947, dated May 9, 1947 at St. James Palace, stamped signature of George VI, two other signatures, embossed seal of Princess Elizabeth, 303 mm x 407 mm; his Second World War Soldier’s Service and Pay Book (handwritten entries, 100 mm x 127 mm, wear evident on the cover); a Letter from the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, St. James Palace addressed to Major Geoffery William Biddle, M. “, in regards to the Secretary transmitting a Warrant of Appointment to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 198 mm x 238 mm; a Letter from the Metropolitan Police (dated October 15, 1980, with attached letter received from the West German Embassy dated October 10, 1980, 210 mm x 297 mm); a NATO Pass numbered “818, with an expiry date of June 30, 1960 in French, signed by Major Biddle U. Delegation and NATO Head of Security Service, 78 mm x 110 mm; a New Scotland Yard C7 Branch Athletic & Social Club Membership Card (numbered “102″, signed by the Honourary Secretary of the Club, 60 mm x 92 mm); a Special Forces Club Membership Card named to G. Biddle”, dated October 1979/80, signed by the Club Secretary, 59 mm x 80 mm; two The Snowball Club Ladies’ Night For Charity Tickets (numbered “254″ and “255, 114 mm x 150 mm); forty-four Photographs (black and white or colour, two portraits in uniform, three in the field, the remaining photos of friends, family and award ceremonies, various sizes); numerous newspaper articles c. 1970s; thirty business cards (most of which are card-mounted), along with assorted research papers. This medal group would be perfect for medal dealers, rare medal group collectors, bomb disposal, police collectors, museums, displays, christmas gift and much much more! The item “Brilliant WW2 MBE George Medal Civil Gallantry Bomb Squad Police Medal Group” is in sale since Monday, December 3, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Gainsborough. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Featured Refinements: Medal Group
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Modified Item: Yes
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Era: 1945-Present
  • Service: Home Front/ Civil Defence
  • Modification Description: George Medal is a Museum Quality Replica
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons