Posts tagged fusiliers

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Irish Fusiliers 1918 British General Service Medal Ww1 Iraq & Nw Persia Campaign

Offered is an original 1918-62 General Service Medal for the Iraq & N. Persia campaigns to a member of the Royal Irish Fusiliers. 36 mm wide circular cupro-nickel medal with ornate scrolled ribbon suspension bar with IRAQ & N. The medal is impressed named to: 33256 PTE. Issacs McCandless served with the Royal Engineers (Inland Water Transport) during the First World War and was transferred to the Royal Irish Fusiliers (most likely to the 2nd battalion). In 1919 the 2nd Battalion was sent to Iraq, moving on to Egypt and Turkey before settling in India for nine years in 1923. The medal was originally instituted on 19 January 1923 to be awarded to Army and Air Force personnel involved in small conflicts outside Africa and India where a separate campaign medal was not issued. The Iraq clasp was presented to those who satisfied one of the following conditions: Served at Ramadi or north of a line east and west through Ramadi between 10 December 1919 and 13 June 1920. Part of an establishment within Iraq between 1 July and 17 November 1920. Persia clasp was presented to members of NoPerForce (North Persia Force) and those on various lines of communications serving under Brigadier-General Hugh Bateman-Champain from 10 August to 31 December 1920. We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. 2/135 Russell St, Morley, WA. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “IRISH FUSILIERS 1918 BRITISH GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL WW1 IRAQ & NW PERSIA CAMPAIGN” is in sale since Thursday, June 20, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • BAGDHAD: SYRIA
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country: IRAQ
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Authenticity: Original
  • Era: 1920s

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers

A World War One War and Victory medal pair with Memorial Plaque to a soldier from. The group was awarded to GS – 37352 Private James Smith of the Royal Fusiliers. The medal group includes the following. The War and Victory Medals – both correctly named as follows. GS – 37352 PTE. The memorial plaque named to. Private James Smith was born in Kings Cross, London and lived in Southery, Norfolk. He enlisted in Norfolk and served with the 4th Battalion (City of London Regiment) of the Royal Fusiliers. He was the son in law of Eliza Cobbin of Southery, Downham, Norfolk. He was killed in action aged 31 on 3rd May 1918 and is buried at the Sandpits British Cemetery in Fouquereuil, France. He was also wounded in October 1917. His Medal Index Card confirms that these were his only medals. An interesting and complete Casualty Medal Group to a worthy of more research. Please let me know if you need any additional photos or details. Please see my other listings of British and foreign Medals and Militaria. Thanks and kind regards. The item “WW1 Medal Pair & Plaque KIA 4th (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers” is in sale since Friday, May 3, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “harrypitt69″ and is located in Nottingham. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

Original British Army Military Medal (MM), World War 1, Lancashire Fusiliers

Original British Army Military Medal (MM), World War 1, Lancashire Fusiliers

Original British Army Military Medal (MM), World War 1, Lancashire Fusiliers

Original British Army Military Medal (MM), World War 1, Lancashire Fusiliers

A very good condition Military Medal (MM) dating to the First World War. The medal is correctly named to Private George Preston, 16373, 6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers. His MM was announced in the London Gazette on the 27 June 1918. Medal comes with copies of the Gazette and his Medal Index Card. George Preston hailed from Wolverhampton. There is no mention in the war diary but it seems likely the Medal was awarded for action in 21 March 1918: when the unit was overran near the village of Templeux. The enemy captured the whole village, but was forced out the following day. During the month the unit suffered 20 killed in action with a staggering 463 missing, entirely as a result of the action on the 21st and a smaller scuffle on the 27th. The unit ended the month one third of the size than it started the month. See my other auctions for more Militaria, original and reproduction. The item “Original British Army Military Medal (MM), World War 1, Lancashire Fusiliers” is in sale since Wednesday, December 12, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “hornbeammilitaria” and is located in Birmingham, West Midlands. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)

Researched Ww2 Territorial Medal Group Sjt Bennison Ra Late Lancashire Fusiliers

Researched Ww2 Territorial Medal Group Sjt Bennison Ra Late Lancashire Fusiliers

Researched Ww2 Territorial Medal Group Sjt Bennison Ra Late Lancashire Fusiliers

Researched Ww2 Territorial Medal Group Sjt Bennison Ra Late Lancashire Fusiliers

NORMAN COLEMAN BENNISON – ROYAL ARTILLERY (TA). FORMERLY LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS (TA). The group of five medals is very nicely court mounted for display. The WW2 medals are unnamed, as they were issued, and the Efficiency Medal is correctly named in impressed capitals. The group consists of the following. France and Germany Star. Territorial Efficiency Medal – named 3448188 SJT. PLEASE CHECK OUT MY OTHER LISTINGS FOR MANY MORE INTERESTING ITEMS, INCLUDING ORIGINAL WW1 MEDAL RIBBON AND MORE WW2 MEDAL GROUPS WITH A NAMED MEDAL. Norman Coleman Bennison was born on 29th May 1915 in Broughton, Salford, to John Henry Bennison and Lilly Bennison (nee Coleman). His sister, Elsie May Bennison, was born on 6th August 1916. Norman married Elsie Booth in Salford in September 1939. The couple had two sons. Raymond V Bennison was born in the second quarter of 1945. He married Deirdra M Taylor in the Salford Registration District in the third quarter of 1971. A daughter was born in 1976 and a son was born in 1982 (the son was given his late uncles name as his middle one). Graham Bennison was born in the final quarter of 1946 in the Heywood Lancashire Registration District. He married Christine S Bradburn in the Barton Greater Manchester Registration District in the second quarter of 1969. Two daughters were born in 1970 and 1974. Graham died at the age of only 34 in March 1981 – death registered in the Salford Registration District. Normans wife died in October 1999, at the age of 84, in the Denbighshire North Clwyd Registration District. Norman was 89 years old when he died in July 2004. His death was registered in the same District as his wife. Turning to his army service. In brief:- #. The Efficiency Medal was issued after 12 years of service (war service counted as double) by which time he had reached the rank of sergeant and was serving in the Royal Artillery. The Service number is from a block allotted to The Lancashire Fusiliers (LF). LF (TA) in 1936 was converted to 39 (LF) Searchlight Bn. On the 1 August 1940 the Bn became a Searchlight Regiment RA. In May 1943 the Batteries of the Searchlight Regiment became came independent units when the HQ Unit was reduced to a cadre. 356 Searchlight Battery RA (356th Moonlight Battery RA) was the only battery to serve in NW Europe. #The 356th Moonlight Battery, Royal Artillery. #The 356th Moonlight Battery, Royal Artillery was a searchlight unit of the British Army that provided artificial illumination, or’Monty’s Moonlight’, for night operations by 21st Army Group during the campaign in North West Europe in 194445. In the 1930s the increasing need for anti-aircraft (AA) defence for Britain’s cities was addressed by converting a number of Territorial Army (TA) infantry battalions into searchlight battalions of the Royal Engineers (RE). The 7th Bn Lancashire Fusiliers was one unit selected for this role, becoming 39th (The Lancashire Fusiliers) AA Battalion, RE in 1936. Consisting of HQ and four AA companies (354357) at the Drill Hall, Cross Lane, Salford. The TA’s AA units were mobilised on 23 September 1938 during the Munich Crisis, with units manning their emergency positions within 24 hours, even though many did not yet have their full complement of men or equipment. The emergency lasted three weeks, and they were stood down on 13 October. In February 1939 the existing AA defences came under the control of a new Anti-Aircraft Command. In June, as the international situation worsened, a partial mobilisation of the TA was begun in a process known as’couverture’, whereby each AA unit did a month’s tour of duty in rotation to man selected AA gun and searchlight positions. This deployment to guard Vital Points (VP) continued through the period known as the’Phoney War’ until the company was fully equipped with searchlights. On 1 August 1940 the AA battalions of the RE were transferred to the Royal Artillery (RA), the 39th being designated 39th (The Lancashire Fusiliers) Searchlight Regiment, RA, and the Companies became Batteries. The day of the formal transfer happened to be Minden Day, celebrated in all battalions of the Lancashire Fusiliers by wearing red roses. 356 Battery held a parade at Salford. Despite transfer to the RE and then the RA, the regiment and its batteries continued to wear their Lancashire Fusiliers’ cap badges and buttons. Shortly afterwards, 355 and 356 Batteries went to Orkney, where they formed part of Orkney and Shetland Defences (OSDEF) guarding the vital Scapa Flow naval base against occasional Luftwaffe nuisance raids and reconnaissance aircraft. They were later joined by Regimental HQ. The newly arrived searchlight crews were continuously in action, some stationed in the docks area that was a particular target of these raids. In mid-November 1941 the regiment was redeployed, with 356 Bty moving to east Preston. In November 1942, 356 Battery handed over its searchlight sites and went into training prior to becoming an independent battery for overseas service. By January 1943, 356 Bty had completed mobile and battle training, and was temporarily attached to 59th S/L Rgt manning sites near Edinburgh. By May 1943 the threat from German air raids had receded, and a number of searchlight units were reduced or converted to other roles. 39th S/L Regiment HQ was reduced to a cadre and took no further part in the war. By this time, the battery had been designated 356 (Independent) Searchlight Battery, RA but continued to wear Lancashire Fusiliers’ badges and buttons. In April and May 1943 the battery underwent mobile training at Kinloss in Scotland and at Thurstaston on the Wirral, then in June it moved to Margate in Kent to begin training in cooperation with heavy anti-aircraft (HAA) guns under 74th AA Brigade, one of the formations preparing for Operation Overlord, the planned Allied invasion of Normandy. In the autumn it moved toNorthampton and later Warwick, using Air Defence of Great Britain searchlight positions for training in cooperation withRoyal Air Force night fighters and providing’Canopy’ coverage over VPs such as airfields. In February 1944, 356 S/L Bty came under the command of 105th AA Brigade (another Overlord formation). In April the battery painted white Allied stars on its vehicles and moved to Southend-on-Sea for final preparations for the invasion; meanwhile its S/L crews were deployed to provide’Canopy’ coverage at RAF Twinwood Farm and RAF Coltishall. Late in the month, the whole battery moved into sealed camps in the invasion force’s concentration area. Battery HQ and advanced parties of the S/L Troops embarked on LSTs at Southampton between 31 May and 4 June, and began landing on the King Beach sector of Gold Beach late on D-Day (6 June), although they were unable get any searchlights ashore before darkness fell. A Troop had seven lights (out of a planned 16) in operation by 20.30 on D + 1, in time for an air raid at 23.30. The first light exposed, A3,’went straight up on a Ju88′. The following night, with 15 lights in action, B6 caught a Heinkel He 111 and passed it to a succession of S/Ls while all the AA guns on land and sea fired, bringing it down in flames. [14] The battery was operating under 76th AA Brigade, responsible for the AA defence of the Gold beachhead, the Mulberry harbour under construction at Arromanches, and the oil terminal at Port-en-Bessin. C Troop and the remainder of the frontline elements of the battery arrived on Motor Transports from Southend on 9 June (D + 3), but the vehicles could not be landed until the next day. The Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers workshop, Royal Corps of Signals section and rear echelon vehicles did not arrive until some weeks later. Over succeeding nights the S/Ls were in use against nuisance raids over the beachhead, with some casualties suffered from the bombing. The lights forced the Luftwaffe to attack from greater height. From 14 June the battery also operated one S/L as an’Orbit’ beacon for RAF night fighters. On 12 July (D + 36) the routine for 356 Bty was broken when it was ordered to send three S/L detachments to cooperate with 474 (Ind) S/L Bty in providing’artificial moonlight’ for a tank concentration in the forward area. Apart from AA defence, mobile 90 cm searchlights were used in the North West Europe campaign to reflect light off the cloudbase to provide artificial moonlight or’movement light’ (also known as’Monty’s moonlight’, after the commander of 21st Army Group, Gen Bernard Montgomery) in support of night operations. After the test carried out by 356 and 474 Btys, the newly arrived 344th (Ind) S/L Bty used the technique operationally for the first time to assist the assembly of 15th (Scottish) Division for Operation Greenline on the night of 14/15 July. Meanwhile, S/L positions were in action nightly, and during the day were frequently subject to ground attack, to which they responded with Light machine guns. S/L detachments were routinely equipped with Bren guns for close AA defence, but in July they began to receive 20 mm Polsten guns. On 26 July the eight S/Ls of B Troop were sent to operate round the recently captured town of Caen under command of 100th AA Brigade. The bridges over the Caen canal were under regular night air attack, causing casualties among the S/L crews, and the S/L positions were also under shellfire. B Troop was relieved by 557 (Ind) S/L Bty at the end of July. After 21st Army Group’s breakout from the Normandy beachhead at the end of August 1944, AA units began leap-frogging forwards. By 4 September, 76th AA Bde, including 356 Bty, was relieving the frontline troops in providing AA defence for Amiens and along the River Somme. The battery was relieved in turn on 22 September, and moved up to reinforce 107th AA Brigade in the Siege of Dunkirk. Here the task was to counter Luftwaffe bombers attempting to drop supplies to the German garrison. 356 S/L Bty was withdrawn from the Dunkirk siege lines on 1 November, and on 10 November a troop of the battery joined 74th AA Bde guarding Grave bridge. By the end of the month, two troops were at the Grave and Mook bridges, while Battery HQ and the remainder of the battery were with 106th AA Brigade guarding river and canal crossings at Geleen and Maastricht in XXX Corps’ area. From 17 December until 344 Bty relieved 356 Bty on 22 December, there was increased enemy air activity over the Maas bridges in connection with the German Ardennes Offensive. At the beginning of January 1945, 356 Bty moved to Namur to join 106th AA Bde supporting XXX Corps for the forthcoming Operation Veritable. A Troop provided artificial moonlight to assist bridgebuilding by the sappers of 6th Airborne Divisionand the battery provided low-intensity movement light for the Corps assembly areas. When Veritable opened on 9 February, 356 Bty also had 557 Bty under its command, with one troop supporting 3rd Canadian Division and the other two providing movement light on the roads. For the attacks on the Siegfried line(Westwall) bunkers, which took place on the night of D/D +1, part of the Klever Reichswald was floodlit, and some S/L positions were sited with the intention of dazzling the defenders while lighting up the obstacles. After their success in Veritable, 356 and the other S/L batteries providing movement light were redesignated’Moonlight’ batteries and assigned to corps. 356th Moonlight Battery continued with XXX Corps, whose commander, Lt-Gen Brian Horrocks, had highly commended the battery. The whole battery, together with Horrocks and his Corps Commander Royal Artillery, resisted the transfer, and the battery continued planning for Plunder’as if nothing had happened’, while taking the precaution of refitting its lights with AA radar. Members of the battery were given permission to wear the XXX Corps wild boar (or’Old Pig’) shoulder flash for the Rhine crossing. Trials of various S/L arrangements were carried out on the River Maas, and the plan decided on was for four banks of lights, one behind the assembly areas, two interspersed among them, and one well forward, close to the west bank of the river, a total of 33 S/L projectors per corps. As part of the deception plan, artificial moonlight was deployed randomly along the Rhine for some nights prior to the assault, to accustom the Germans to it. A, B and C Troops were assigned to go forward with 43rd (Wessex) Division, Guards Armoured Division and 51st (Highland) Division respectively, while 582 M/L Bty, under operational command of 356 Bty, was with XXX Corps HQ. H-Hour for Plunder was 21.00 on 23 March, and at first only C Troop supporting 51st (Highland) Division was committed, with its radio communications assisted by reconnaissance cars of the Derbyshire Yeomanry. The assault waves of amphibious Buffaloes and DD Shermans began moving down to their crossing points under the movement light. By 27 March, after the success of the crossings, A and C Troops were operating on the east side of the river. The Luftwaffe made determined efforts to destroy the bridges being built behind the assault troops, and were engaged at night by AA fire directed both by searchlight and by radar. On 29 March, 356 Bty did finally transfer to 107 AA Bde for AA defence of the II Canadian Corps crossing at Emmerich, except A Troop, which continued in the movement light and’fighting light’ role with 43rd (Wessex) Division as it advanced into Germany. By mid April the Rhine was already a’back area’, and 107 AA Bde advanced with the Canadians to the coast. On 24 April, 356 deployed Troops and Sections with batteries from 109th HAA Regiment to light and control the channels into the port of Emden. The battery was under the command of 5th Canadian Armoured Division when the German surrender at L√ľneburg Heath came on 4 May. The War Diary reports on 1 August 1945 that’Minden Day was celebrated as well as it was possible to do so with the Bty so widely deployed’. Shortly afterwards the battery was demobilised. The item “RESEARCHED WW2 TERRITORIAL MEDAL GROUP SJT BENNISON RA LATE LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS” is in sale since Wednesday, August 1, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “dave7gr1″ and is located in Hereford. This item can be shipped to United Kingdom, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Australia, United States, Canada, Brazil, Japan, New Zealand, China, Israel, Hong Kong, Norway, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Saudi arabia, South africa, United arab emirates, Ukraine, Chile.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals

We offer for sale this wonderful original LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS WW1 3 MEDALS AND DEATH PLAQUE AWARDED TO 9659. RICHARD THOMAS 10th BATTALION LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS. ALL THREE MEDALS ARE INSCRIBED HOW THEY SHOULD BE AS IS THE DEATH PLAQUE. Included are the 3 medal certificates and death certificate a real nice and collectable item. The item “WW 1 Lancashire fusiliers Memorial Death Plaque and 3 Medals” is in sale since Tuesday, August 21, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “lesleyjazz2010″ and is located in Bury. This item can be shipped to all countries in Europe, United States, Japan, Canada, Australia.
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Type: Death Plaque and Pair of Medals
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Casualty 2/ Royal Fusiliers Rare Pre Ww1 British Army Queens South Africa Medal

Boer War Queens South Africa Medal to Private Hunter, who served with the 2nd Battalion (City of London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers, who died of Enteric Fever on the 6th April 1900 at Modder Spruit. Queen’s South Africa Medal measures 36mm wide and is a circular silver medal with claw and swivel ribbon bar suspension, with CAPE COLONY, TUGELA HEIGHTS & RELIEF OF LADYSMITH clasps; the face with the veiled crowned head and shoulders portrait of Queen Victoria facing left, circumscribed VICTORIA REGINA ET IMPERATRIX (Victoria Queen and Empress), signed G. De Saulles; officially re – impressed named to 5776 PTE W. HUNTER, 2ND ROYAL FUS: on correct ribbon. The medal was instituted in 1899 to be awarded to participants in the Boer War. The medal roll for the 2nd Battalion shows Hunter as having died on the 6th April 1900, with further research showing he died of Enteric Fever at Modder Spruit. Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). The 2nd Battalion sailed from Gibraltar on the Pavonia, arrived at the Cape about 18th November 1899, and was at once sent round to Durban. Along with the 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and 2nd Royal Irish Fusiliers, they formed the 6th or Fusilier Brigade under Major General Barton, which was originally intended to be part of the IIIrd Division under General Gatacre, but the stress of events necessitated the breaking up of that division. The brigade was present at Colenso and formed the right of the infantry advance, otherwise the flank nearest to Hlangwane Mountain. A sketch of the Colenso action and of the doings of the Natal Army generally is given under 2nd Royal West Surrey. It appears from the orders issued by General Clery on the 14th December that General Buller and he had not quite made up their minds whether Hlangwane would be attacked or left alone. Colonial Irregulars did make some advance up its steep sides, but they were not supported. In his despatch of 17th December General Buller says, “The mounted troops under Lord Dundonald, supported by two guns of the 7th Battery RFA and two battalions 6th Brigade, were heavily engaged with a considerable force that attacked my right flank, and which they repulsed”. Unofficial accounts rather give one the impression that the attack was by the British, and that, perhaps because of the gun entanglement, it was not pushed home. According to Mr Bennet Burleigh (p 217), the Royal Fusiliers were on the extreme right. As they had almost no losses they could not have been heavily engaged. The Royal Scots Fusiliers suffered considerably, but they are stated by Mr Bennet Burleigh (p 203) to have been on Barton’s left, nearest Colenso, and not far from the lost guns. When General Buller moved west towards the Upper Tugela, about 9th January, General Barton was left to guard the rail-head at Chieveley, and with his small force made various demonstrations to keep the enemy at Colenso. At the end of January a portion of the brigade, including the Royal Scots Fusiliers, was taken to the main army. When Sir Redvers Buller had come back to Chieveley, and determined to make a fourth attempt via the Boer left, the Fusilier Brigade were the first infantry employed. On 12th February Lord Dundonald seized Hussar Hill, his force being the South African Light Horse, Composite Mounted Infantry, Thorneycroft’s Mounted Infantry (or what was left of them after Spion Kop), the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, a battery of Colt guns, and a battery RFA. The hill was taken for the purpose of reconnaissance only, and the force retired, having a few casualties in that process. On the 14th the hill was again taken and occupied, the Welsh Fusiliers being the first infantry regiment and the Fusilier Brigade being part of the garrison of the hill. The brigade took part in practically all the fighting between the 14th and 27th. On the 17th the Welsh and Irish took part in an attack on Greenhill, which was not pressed. Next day “General Warren, throwing the 6th Brigade forward, the position [Greenhill] was well carried by the Royal Scots Fusiliers and abandoned precipitately by the enemy, who left a large quantity of materiel, many dead and wounded, and a few prisoners behind them”. On the 19th the brigade took Hlangwane. On the 24th the battalion, along with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was holding some kopjes near Langerwachte, where they had to lie under heavy shell and rifle fire. In the final assault on the Boer position on 27th February General Barton’s task was to take Pieter’s Hill. His force that day was the Royal Irish, Royal Scots, and Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and right well did they carry out their mission. Had that assault miscarried the remainder of the operations would have been at a standstill. On the fourteen days’ fighting the battalion’s losses were 1 officer and 3 men killed, 4 officers and 70 men wounded. One officer and 10 non-commissioned officers and men were mentioned by General Buller in his despatch of 30th March, of the latter being recommended for the distinguished conduct medal. After the relief of Ladysmith the 5th and 6th Brigades, now called the Xth Division, were placed under Lieutenant General A Hunter, and in preparation for the relief of Mafeking and the occupation of the Western Transvaal the Division was brought round to Cape Colony. The 5th Brigade, still under Major General Fitzroy Hart, was utilised to assist in the relief of Wepener, which was effected on 24th April. In the meantime the 6th Brigade had been gathering at Kimberley, and on 5th May General Hunter attacked and defeated the enemy at Rooidam, west of the Kimberley-Warrenton line, the Fusilier Brigade having all the work. The battle of Rooidam enabled the Mafeking relief column to get a clear start. The column comprised four guns M Battery RHA, two pom-poms, the Kimberley Mounted Corps, the Imperial Light Horse, and an infantry company made up of four sections specially selected from each of the four battalions in the Fusilier Brigade. Under the very skilful leadership of Colonel Mahon the column joined hands with Plumer on 15th May, the enemy was defeated on the 16th, and Mafeking entered on the 17th. General Hunter, having been joined by Hart, occupied Lichtenburg on 2nd June, Klerksdorp on 9th June, and he marched thence and arrived at Johannesburg on 22nd June, and joined hands with Clery and the old Natal comrades at Vlakfontein on the Natal-Johannesburg Railway on 5th July. About the 21st June the Fusilier Brigade was split up. General Barton remained with the 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers and the 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Krugersdorp, while the Royal and Royal Irish Fusiliers were sent to the east of Pretoria, and these two regiments took part in many operations in the Eastern Transvaal. The Royal Fusiliers along with the Connaught Rangers were put into a column under Colonel Mahon. This column supported Ian Hamilton, who with a full infantry brigade marched on the north of the railway in the general advance eastwards, and upon 24th July, along with other troops, occupied Bronkhorst Spruit. Twelve officers and 15 non-commissioned officers and men of the battalion were mentioned in Lord Roberts’ final despatch. The Royal Fusiliers remained in the Eastern Transvaal under various brigadiers, including General Paget, till February 1901, when they were railed to Rosmead, in Cape Colony, where rebels and raiders were then causing Lord Kitchener no little anxiety. Here they had a worrying life, not very fruitful of glory. The enemy was more elusive than ever. In May 1902, just as the curtain was about to drop, the battalion had another sea voyage, being taken round to Port Nolloth, on the west coast of the colony, to assist in the relief of Ookiep, which was successfully carried out. Captain C Fitzclarence of the City of London Regiment, one of the many officers fighting for the credit of their regiments but not with them, gained the VC at Mafeking on 14th October 1899 for great gallantry when in command of his squadron of the Protectorate Regiment. In Lord Kitchener’s final despatch 7 officers and 5 non-commissioned officers and men were mentioned. We list militaria and coins weekly. We provide quality mounted medals, badges and historical research. We can mount your miniature or full size medals, ribbon bars or supply replacement ribbons or badges. We can also conduct military research on your behalf and value cherished objects with a current market or insured value. 2/135 Russell St, Morley, WA. We run two specialist military auctions per year. Items are accurately described & photographed. Additional costs for this standard service will be added for this service based on publicly available Australia Post rates. Please note, these items are located and will be posted from Australia. We appreciate fair feedback from you once you receive the item. We aim to give you, the customer our best customer service. The item “CASUALTY 2/ ROYAL FUSILIERS RARE PRE WW1 BRITISH ARMY QUEENS SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL” is in sale since Tuesday, December 20, 2016. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “jb_military_antiques_14″ and is located in 2/135 Russell St, Morley, Perth, WA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Authenticity: Original
  • Era: 1900s
  • Country: South Africa
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Campaign: World War I

ORIGL 3 WW1 George V 1914-1918 TRIO MEDALS TO S E OLLIPHANT RYL INNIS FUSILIERS

ORIGL 3 WW1 George V 1914-1918 TRIO MEDALS TO S E OLLIPHANT RYL INNIS FUSILIERS

ORIGL 3 WW1 George V 1914-1918 TRIO MEDALS TO S E OLLIPHANT RYL INNIS FUSILIERS

ORIGL 3 WW1 George V 1914-1918 TRIO MEDALS TO S E OLLIPHANT RYL INNIS FUSILIERS

A VERY SCARCE ORIGINAL ROYAL INNISKILLING FUSILIERS 1ST WORLD WAR TRIO TO AN ULSTER MAN IN A GALLANT FAMOUS FIGHTING FRONT LINE REGIMENT. The item “ORIGL 3 WW1 George V 1914-1918 TRIO MEDALS TO S E OLLIPHANT RYL INNIS FUSILIERS” is in sale since Monday, June 18, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “ulsternote” and is located in Belfast. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

Ww1 British Meritorious Service Medal 139 C. Q. M. Sjt F Morgan 9/r. Fusiliers

WW1 BRITISH MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL – 139 C. SJT F MORGAN 9/R. FUSILIERS COMPANY QUARTER MASTER SERGEANT IN THE 9TH ROYAL FUSILIERS WITH A VERY LOW SERVICE NUMBER FULL SIZE MEDAL IN GOOD CONDITION A FEW MINOR EDGE BUMBS ETC BUT OVERALL GOOD IN SILVER WITH SWIVEL SUSPENDER CORRECTLY NAMED AND GENUINE AND ORIGINAL MEDAL TO: 139 C. The item “WW1 BRITISH MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL 139 C. Q. M. SJT F MORGAN 9/R. FUSILIERS” is in sale since Saturday, June 16, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “uk.g424″ and is located in York. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Here we have a Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group, Here we have a lovely group of 7 medals all together with original ribbons, in mainly good condition for age, Medals are all correctly named except for the victory medal and the 15 star which both look to have been re impressed. Both Sudan medals are correctly named 5084 Pte A Pollitt 2/Lan Fus, QSA 5 bar and KSA are correctly impressed 5084 Pte A Pollitt Lanc Fus, British war medal is correctly named 5473 Pte A Pollitt Lan Fus, This is a lovely scarce combination despite the 2 medals odd naming, definitely worthy of further research, ideal for dealers, researchers, museums, displays, lectures, historians, investigators, family researchers, hobbyists and much much more! Please check our other wonderful military historical items! The item “Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group” is in sale since Wednesday, June 6, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Lincoln. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Featured Refinements: Lancashire Fusiliers Medal
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1816-1913

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group

Here we have a Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group, Here we have a lovely group of 7 medals all together with original ribbons, in mainly good condition for age, Medals are all correctly named except for the victory medal and the 15 star which both look to have been re impressed. Both Sudan medals are correctly named 5084 Pte A Pollitt 2/Lan Fus, QSA 5 bar and KSA are correctly impressed 5084 Pte A Pollitt Lanc Fus, British war medal is correctly named 5473 Pte A Pollitt Lan Fus, This is a lovely scarce combination despite the 2 medals odd naming, definitely worthy of further research, ideal for dealers, researchers, museums, displays, lectures, historians, investigators, family researchers, hobbyists and much much more! Please check our other wonderful military historical items! The item “Brilliant Scarce Sudan Khartoum Boer War WW1 Lancashire Fusiliers Medal Group” is in sale since Tuesday, May 29, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “knightofengland2011″ and is located in Lincoln. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Clothing Type: Medals
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1816-1913
  • Featured Refinements: Lancashire Fusiliers Medal