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German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original

German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original. Good original iron cross first class WW1. Some wear to black on front but commensurate with age. Marked 800 on rear excellent pin and c clasp. Please review all pictures to determine condition for yourself. This will make a great addition to your home and collection. The item “German Iron Cross First Class 1914 medal WW1 marked 800 silver all original” is in sale since Monday, August 26, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “hgcor” and is located in Buda, Texas. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Featured Refinements: Iron Cross
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany

First World War. Four brother’s family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

First World War. Four brother's family group medals and Memorial Plaques

Four brother’s family group medals and Memorial Plaques. A remarkable and extremely rare (probably unique being retained together) set of family medals. Come with supporting research material (1911 census record printout, CWGC printouts and extracts from the battalion war diaries of 1st/6th Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment and the 1st Lancashire Regiment). 2599 Lance Corporal Philip Murphy, 6th Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment (Sherwood Foresters). NOTE: 6th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters, was a volunteer unit of Britain’s Territorial Army. (First raised as The High Peak Rifles, in the High Peak area of Derbyshire in 1860), it fought as infantry on the Western Front during World War I. Attached as 43090 Lance Corporal to 1st Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment. Died of wounds in France 26th September 1916. At Flers-Courcelette or Morval. In 1916 1st Lincolnshire Regt were involved at. The Battle of Albert (Somme 1st-13th July). The Battle of Bazentin Ridge (Somme 14th July-17th July). The Battle of FlersCourcelette. The Battle of Morval (25th-28thSept). Born Lea, Kent, enlisted Whaley Bridge. (Census 1911 records birthplace as Lee, London). Buried in GROVE TOWN CEMETERY, MEAULTE, Somme, France. In September 1916, the 34th and 2/2nd London Casualty Clearing Stations were established at this point, known to the troops as Grove Town, to deal with casualties from the Somme battlefields. 2052 Private Walter Francis Joseph Murphy, 1st/6th Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment (The Sherwood Foresters). Died of wounds aged 20 in France 3rd July 1916. These were received on the first day of the Somme offensive Battle of Albert when the 1/6th was part of the 46th Division which was ordered to attack the north side of the Gommecourt salient, on the northern flank of the Somme battlefield. On 1 July, 1/6th Bn of the Notts and Derbyshire Regt. Was in support behind the attacking battalions of 139th Bde. A and B Companies took up positions in the British 1st Support Line, with the battalion bombers and four brigade machine gun teams between them, and C and D Companies were in the 3rd Support Line with the runners and signallers between them. Because of the mud, they were late getting into position and were very tired by the time they arrived, carrying large quantities of equipment and ammunition. When the battalion attempted to move up after Zero hour (07.30), it found that the way was blocked by the carrying parties and last waves of the battalions in front, which had not been able to leave the British front line trench before the smokescreen cleared. Although their first waves had crossed No man’s land and got into the German front line, the ground behind them was now being swept by artillery and machine gun fire, and positions re-occupied by Germans coming out of deep dugouts that should have been dealt with by the later waves. It was not until 08.45 that A and B Companies of the 1/6th Bn attempted to cross No man’s land, and they were immediately stopped by very heavy casualties. The Commanding Officer, Lt-Col Goodman, called off his battalion’s attack. There was an attempt to restart the attack at 15.30, but the smoke barrage was inadequate and it was cancelled. The left-hand platoon did not receive the cancellation order in time, went’over the top’ and was cut down. The battalion lost 41 men killed or died of wounds received on 1 July 1916. Born at Lee, London – according to CWGC. Buried in WARLINCOURT HALTE BRITISH CEMETERY, SAULTY, Pas de Calais, France. The site of the cemetery was chosen in May 1916. It was used from June 1916 to May 1917 by the 20th and 43rd Casualty Clearing Stations. 13249 Lance Corporal Cyril Hubert Murphy, 14th Battalion, Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment). Nickname The Die Hards. Died in United Kingdom 17th November 1915. Buried in SHOREHAM-BY-SEA CEMETERY, Sussex. 14th (Reserve) Battalion Oct 1914 Formed at Gravesend as a service Battalion in the Fourth New Army (K4), and joined the 93rd Brigade of the original 31st Division. Jan 1915 Moved to Halling, Kent. 10.04.1915 Renamed the 2nd Reserve Battalion and the 5th Reserve Brigade. May 1915 Moved to Colchester, Essex. Oct 1915 Moved to Shoreham, Kent. 01.09.1916 Renamed the 24th Training Reserve Battalion in the 5th Reserve Brigade at Shoreham. The above names are all on the WHALEY BRIDGE War Memorial, Derbyshire. 31715 Guardsman Gerald J Murphy Grenadier Guards. Rave showing religion as Roman Catholic. Grenadier badge and tunic buttons also mounted. Provenance: Anderson Garland, Newcastle. Framed dimension: 80cms x 42cms Weight: 3.6kgs. Condition: Superbly presented and framed. If anything shows the stupidity of war this must be it. The item “First World War. Four brother’s family group medals and Memorial Plaques” is in sale since Thursday, August 8, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “nigel315″ and is located in St Boswells, Melrose, Borders. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Military Medal, GV First World War issue to G-61011 Pte A Shaw 7/R. Fus. GVF

Military Medal, GV First World War issue to G-61011 Pte A Shaw 7/R. Fus. GVF

Military Medal, GV First World War issue to G-61011 Pte A Shaw 7/R. Fus. GVF

Military Medal, GV First World War issue to G-61011 Pte A Shaw 7/R. (City of London Regiment). The item “Military Medal, GV First World War issue to G-61011 Pte A Shaw 7/R. Fus. GVF” is in sale since Tuesday, June 25, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “littlehaywards” and is located in Reigate. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Featured Refinements: Military Medal
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Country/ Organization: Great Britain
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

Killed In Action 25th April 1915 First Day Gallipoli Australian Ww1 Medal Trio

25TH APRIL 1915 FIRST DAY GALLIPOLI AUSTRALIAN WW1 MEDAL TRIO comprising: 1914-15 STAR, BRITISH WAR MEDAL & VICTORY MEDAL, all correctly impressed 62 PTE H BLAKELEY 6TH BN. ” Also present is the MEMORIAL PLAQUE correctly named to “HARRY BLAKELEY. There is also a nice little’TRIBUTE MEDAL’ issued by the City of Heidelberg, which is an inner-suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. On the side that can be seen, around the rim of the medallion, it states’FOR KING AND COUNTRY’and below;’1915 A. In the centre is the wording on a boomerang! PRESENTED TO and then engraved H. The medallion is in great condition. These types of medallions, whilst scarce now, were reasonably common to Australian units during the war. The 6th Battalion was a’famous fighting infantry battalion’. Get the unit history, it provides good context. All of these items are beautifully framed (See the photos). The medals are court-mounted for display, and there is a marvelous, large, detailed photograph measuring 38cm high by 50cm wide which is a recent print of a contemporary photograph. This print shows 11 young men who were all members of the 6th Battalion, AIF. There is a gold-coloured PLAQUE which provides details of the men. It seems that these men were pre-war members of the’Melbourne University’ Regiment. There is one officer in the group, 2nd Lt. He wears the uniform and badges of the Melbourne University Regiment. Sadly, of eleven men pictured, four were KILLED ON 25TH APRIL1915, two KILLED elsewhere during the war, with five making it home. Beautifully framed, great condition. Overall item size is 62cm high by 85cm wide. Impressive, scarce and a wonderful talking point and investment. I can pack it well so as it will make it to you safely. You are VERY welcometo collect! Feel free to come and look at this. Item is located in Croydon, Victoria. PLEASE DO NOT PAY BEFORE DISCUSSING THIS WITH ME FIRST. You are quite welcome to pick it up should you win. Of course, once you win you can also open up the frame to confirm the naming (which I guarantee is how it should be). Returnable if not as described, including naming being correct. Not returnable if you change your mind. The item “KILLED IN ACTION 25TH APRIL 1915 FIRST DAY GALLIPOLI AUSTRALIAN WW1 MEDAL TRIO” is in sale since Wednesday, July 17, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “zerma-jak” and is located in Croydon, VIC. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Era: 1910s
  • Country: Australia
  • Authenticity: Original

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

Original German Iron Cross First Class post WW2 version with no swastika, NICE WORN CONDITION – THREE PIECE CONSTRUCTION, MAGNETIC CORE, GENUINE DEUMER MADE EXAMPLE, TYPICAL DEUMER HARDWARE / HARD TO FIND – SHOWS SOME RUST. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War IIera decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses , Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. Among the holders of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class was Adolf Hitler, who held the rank of Gefreiter. Hitler can be seen wearing the award on his left breast, as was standard, in many photographs. The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, the emblem of the Wehrmacht, first used in a narrower form on Luftstreitkräfte aircraft in mid-April 1918, and as shown here, as it appeared on German planes, tanks, and other vehicles during the Second World War. Adolf Hitler restored the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German decoration (rather than Prussian as in earlier versions), continuing the tradition of issuing it in various grades. Legally it is based on the enactment Reichsgesetzblatt I S. 1573 of 1 September 1939 Verordnung über die Erneuerung des Eisernen Kreuzes (Regulation for the Re-introduction of the Iron Cross). The Iron Cross of the Second World War was divided into three main series of decorations with an intermediate category, the Knight’s Cross, instituted between the lowest, the Iron Cross, and the highest, the Grand Cross. The Knight’s Cross replaced the Prussian Pour le Mérite or “Blue Max”. Hitler did not care for the Pour le Mérite, as it was a Prussian order that could be awarded only to officers. The ribbon of the medal (2nd class and Knight’s Cross) was different from the earlier Iron Crosses in that the color red was used in addition to the traditional black and white (black and white were the colours of Prussia, while black, white, and red were the colors of Germany). Hitler also created the War Merit Cross as a replacement for the non-combatant version of the Iron Cross. It also appeared on certain Nazi flags in the upper left corner. The edges were curved, like most original iron crosses. The standard 1939 Iron Cross was issued in the following two grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse abbreviated as EKI or E. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: when in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar, for everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross First Class was a pin-on medal with no ribbon and was worn centered on a uniform breast pocket, either on dress uniforms or everyday outfit. It was a progressive award, with the second class having to be earned before the first class and so on for the higher degrees. It is estimated that some four and a half million Second Class Iron Crosses were awarded in the Second World War, and 300,000 of the First Class. The item “7752 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER” is in sale since Sunday, April 8, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in Abbots Langley. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued

2018 US World War I Silver Six Coin & Medal Proof Set PCGS PR69 First Strike

2018 US World War I Silver Six Coin & Medal Proof Set PCGS PR69 First Strike

2018 US World War I Silver Six Coin & Medal Proof Set PCGS PR69 First Strike

Serving Collectors and Investors for Over 50 Years. Deal of the Day. 2018 US World War I Silver Six Coin & Medal Proof Set – PCGS PR69 First Strike. 2018 US World War I Centennial Commemorative Silver Six Coin & Medal Proof Set Certified PCGS PR69 Deep Cameo – First Strike This set includes: 2018-P US World War I Commemorative Silver Dollar Proof – PCGS PR69 DCAM First Strike 2018-D US World War I Commemorative Silver Medal – Air Service – PCGS PR69 DCAM First Strike 2018-W US World War I Commemorative Silver Medal – Army – PCGS PR69 DCAM First Strike 2018-P US World War I Commemorative Silver Medal – Coast Guard – PCGS PR69 DCAM – First Strike 2018-S US World War I Commemorative Silver Medal – Marines – PCGS PR69 DCAM First Strike 2018-P US World War I Commemorative Silver Medal – Navy – PCGS PR69 DCAM – First Strike The World War I Centennial Silver Medals were issued in conjuction with the congressionally authorized World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. The obverse (heads) and reverse (tails) deisngs of these medals honor each branch of the U. Armed Forces active in World War I. This listing uses “Reference Images” The “Reference Images” used in this listing Description were created by Liberty Coin for reference only to depict the quality of the item you will receive. You will NOT receive the exact item, with the same certificate number, that was photographed to create the Reference Images. However, the actual item you will receive is guaranteed to be similar to that shown and exactly as described. W, D, S, P. West Point, Denver, San Francisco, Philadelphia. 0.7734 troy oz. 90% Silver, 10% Copper. Reeded Coin & Plain Medals. Due to additional Safety & Security policies, Orders for Bullion products cannot be processed Same Day. UPS 2 Day Air with Signature Confirmation. However, we reserve the right to make Carrier and Service Level changes due to operating conditions. If you need to change the Address you should cancel your order and place a new order using the correct address. Bullion coins, bars and rounds are mass-produced and are not manufactured to the same quality standards as collector coins. Listed prices for bullion products are firm and not negotiable. Prices will change with movements in the spot price of the underlying metal while precious metals markets are open. Pre-Owned Vintage US Mint Products. Except for current year products, nearly all of our US Mint products have been previously owned. Unless otherwise disclosed, all of our US Mint products come with their complete original packaging. We inspect all pre-owned US Mint products prior to offering them for sale. We only sell sets that have passed our inspection; the coins are typically free of excessive hazing, spotting, or distracting toning. While the items are typically in very good condition for their age, these vintage products are not new. Use of Stock Images. We typically have multiple quantities available of many of our most popular products. As a result we often use “Stock Images” to represent the actual product. When a “Stock Image” is used to merchandise a product, that use will be disclosed as follows. The’Stock Images’ used in this Description are an indicator of the quality of the item you will receive. The actual item you will receive is guaranteed to be as described and depicted. “Random Dates” Product Listings. When purchasing “Random Dates” products you can expect to receive dates and types of our choice, depending upon current stock on hand. Due to high volume it is impractical for us to select specific dates upon request. Liberty Coin attempts to display product images shown on the site as accurately as possible. However, we cannot guarantee that the color you see matches the product color, as the display of the color depends, in part, upon the monitor you are using. Prices and availability of products and services are subject to change without notice. Errors will be corrected where discovered, and Liberty Coin, LLC reserves the right to revoke any stated offer and to correct any errors, inaccuracies or omissions including after an order has been submitted and whether or not the order has been confirmed. Since 1965, Liberty Coin has offered an ever-expanding line of precious metal bullion, collectible coins and US Mint products. Whether you are an investor seeking asset diversification through precious metals, an experienced collector searching for a key date coin, or simply trying to find a vintage Proof Set as a gift, Liberty Coin’s extensive inventory is available to meet your needs. To contact Liberty Coin. Sign up to receive special insider notifications of deals, promotions, and new items! Powered by Solid Commerce The All-in-One Listing, Inventory & Order Management Solution. The item “2018 US World War I Silver Six Coin & Medal Proof Set PCGS PR69 First Strike” is in sale since Tuesday, August 7, 2018. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ US\Commemorative\Modern Silver/Clad (1982-Now)”. The seller is “liberty.coin” and is located in Huntington Beach, California. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, Hong Kong, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Bahamas, Uruguay, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Malta, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, Belgium, France, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Germany, Austria, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Malaysia, Ecuador, Iceland, Cayman islands, Luxembourg, Peru, Paraguay.
  • Composition: Silver
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Uncirculated
  • Strike Type: Proof
  • Mint Location: West Point, Denver, San Francisco, Philadelphia
  • Grade: PR69 DCAM
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Year: 2018
  • Denomination: $1, Medal

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L

Original German Iron Cross First Class post WW2 version without swastika, VERY NICE CONDITION – THREE PIECE CONSTRUCTION, MAGNETIC CORE, GENUINE ST&L (STEINHAUER & LUCK) EARLY EXAMPLE – THE HOOK HAS BEEN REPAIRED. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War IIera decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses , Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. Among the holders of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class was Adolf Hitler, who held the rank of Gefreiter. Hitler can be seen wearing the award on his left breast, as was standard, in many photographs. The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, the emblem of the Wehrmacht, first used in a narrower form on Luftstreitkräfte aircraft in mid-April 1918, and as shown here, as it appeared on German planes, tanks, and other vehicles during the Second World War. Adolf Hitler restored the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German decoration (rather than Prussian as in earlier versions), continuing the tradition of issuing it in various grades. Legally it is based on the enactment Reichsgesetzblatt I S. 1573 of 1 September 1939 Verordnung über die Erneuerung des Eisernen Kreuzes (Regulation for the Re-introduction of the Iron Cross). The Iron Cross of the Second World War was divided into three main series of decorations with an intermediate category, the Knight’s Cross, instituted between the lowest, the Iron Cross, and the highest, the Grand Cross. The Knight’s Cross replaced the Prussian Pour le Mérite or “Blue Max”. Hitler did not care for the Pour le Mérite, as it was a Prussian order that could be awarded only to officers. The ribbon of the medal (2nd class and Knight’s Cross) was different from the earlier Iron Crosses in that the color red was used in addition to the traditional black and white (black and white were the colours of Prussia, while black, white, and red were the colors of Germany). Hitler also created the War Merit Cross as a replacement for the non-combatant version of the Iron Cross. It also appeared on certain Nazi flags in the upper left corner. The edges were curved, like most original iron crosses. The standard 1939 Iron Cross was issued in the following two grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse abbreviated as EKI or E. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: when in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar, for everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross First Class was a pin-on medal with no ribbon and was worn centered on a uniform breast pocket, either on dress uniforms or everyday outfit. It was a progressive award, with the second class having to be earned before the first class and so on for the higher degrees. It is estimated that some four and a half million Second Class Iron Crosses were awarded in the Second World War, and 300,000 of the First Class. The item “6914 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern MAGNETIC ST&L” is in sale since Friday, April 20, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in Abbots Langley. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Era: 1914-1945
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany

Heroic First World War Horse Awarded Dickin Medal 02 09 14

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award

800 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award. Here is your chance to own a lovely Iron Cross 1st class with a period repaired catch. I do not find a silver content marking. I believe the frame was produced in buntmetal or tombak. Correct three-piece construction and would be perfect for a tunic display. In excellent condition overall. Extremely detailed and g. I never grade my items as mint, even though may be. If for any reason you require additional photos, please do not hesitate to ask. View My Other Items For Sale. Get Supersized Images & Free Image Hosting. Create your brand with Auctiva’s. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “EK1 silver Iron Cross first class pin medal badge Imperial WW1 German 1914 award” is in sale since Friday, August 3, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “william_kramer” and is located in Naperville, Illinois. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Modified Item: No

Span Aria Label German Iron Cross Ww2 Ww1 First Class Second Class Identification Military Medal Award By Straittothepoint 5 Years Ago 2 Minutes 7 Seconds 36 531 Views German Iron Cross Ww2 Ww1 First Class Second Class Identification Military Medal Award Span