Posts tagged fighter

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

Ww1 Medal Pair To Sopwith Camel Fighter Pilot Ace

A SCARCE BRITISH WAR AND VICTORY MEDALS TO AN 8 VICTORY SOPWITH CAMEL NAVAL ACE WITH 208 SQUADRON ONE OF THE HIGHEST SCORING FIGHTER SQUADRONS OF WW1 HAVING 298 VICTORIES WITH 26 ACES FLYING WITH THE SQUADRON DURING THE WAR. BRITISH WAR AND VICTORY MEDALS LIEUT. Rupert Cyril D´Arcy Gifford, born 21. October 1898 from Brierly Hill, Staffordshire. Joined the RNAS August 1917, posted to 208 Squadron 22. Obituary tells how he flew 850 hours during WW1, most of them in Sopwith Camels and Snipes and was shot down at least once Thankfully over British lines! After the War he became a Doctor and died October 1991, Sutton in. 6 Victories listed in Above the Trenches. 2 further victories in Combat reports. Copies of which are included, as are unusually copies of combat reports for all his Victories. I say unusually as many fighter squadron combat reports were stolen some years ago and frustratingly when researching a pilot your lucky if you can find more than a handful. Gifford only entitled to BWM/Victory and not even a MID! Surprisingly common for later War Aces. Formed as the famous Naval 8 squadron, when the. Was formed on 1 April 1918, the unit was renumbered 208 Squadron RAF. For disbandment on 7 November 1919 at. During the war, the squadron was one of the top British fighter squadron claiming 298 victories. Twenty-five aces had served in the squadron during this time, including the likes of Flt Commander R A Little (47 victories), Captain W L Jordan (39 victories) and Flt Commander C D Booker (29 Victories). GIFFORDS AERIAL VICTORY LIST. NE of La Bassée. 1 mi S of Estaires. 2 mi NE of Brancourt. Condition NEF, rim of BWM cleaned a little as was so dark, letters could not be easily seen. With copy combat reports, Service record, MIC, copy Aero certificate photo, copy of his obituary with picture of him in his Sopwith Camel and other research. A very good pair of medals to an Ace in a crack fighter squadron. PLEASE NOTE; If you have any questions and require more images please get in touch. SEE MY OTHER AUCTIONS FOR SIMILAR ITEMS. KEYWORDS: MEDAL MEDALS BOER KILLED WOUNDED BRIGADE AWARD CAPTAIN COMMANDER LIEUTENANT OFFICER KILLED WOUNDED 1815 AUSTRALIAN NEW ZEALAND ANZAC AIF GALLANTRY SOMME YPRES GALLIPOLI LIGHT HORSE INFANTRY BATTALION. The item “WW1 MEDAL PAIR TO SOPWITH CAMEL FIGHTER PILOT ACE” is in sale since Friday, January 3, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “albatrosj1″ and is located in SCOTLAND. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

Superb Ww1 American Jewish Fighter Ace Aviation Medal Badge & Documents Pilot

CAPTAIN JACQUES SWAAB 22. AERO SQUADRON DSC, 2X SILVER STARS AND PURPLE HEART. RECOMMENDED AND APPROVED FOR THE AWARD OF THE MEDAL OF HONOR. Of American pilots serving exclusively with the US squadrons, Jaques Swaab was the 3. Highest scoring Ace of WW1. The two higher scoring were the Rickenbacker with 26, flying from March 1918 and the remarkable Frank Luke with 18 from July 1918. Swaab first saw action in September 1918 and spent several weeks in hospital after being wounded, had 10 confirmed and a further up to 7 unconfirmed in just 65 hours in the air! One of, if not the highest of any Nation for hours flown to victories. The first 3 scored on his first flight over the front during an epic encounter in which he was seriously wounded, passed out and crashed his aircraft.. Of all American pilots serving during WW1, Swaab was joint 25. Highest scoring Ace, however the vast majority of the others had served with the RFC or French Air service for a good time (some years), many of these never serving in a US squadron. Distinguished Service Cross, numbered 6256 to Swaab. Silver Star with Oak leaf cluster for second Award, named to Swaab. Purple Heart, named to Swaab. Victory medal with 3 clasps and 10 silver stars one for each victory. New York State Conspicuous Service Cross, no2055. New York State WWI Service Medal. Incredibly rare Aero Club of America Award, only given to Aces. Ribbon bars for above medals. Swaabs WW1 flying licence. Swaabs Pilot badge, unit patch and collar badges from uniform. Aero Squadron enamel badge, only a handful of these extent. One of the photos in the group shows Swaab wearing his. World War Birds International badge and certificate (no 204). Another hugely rare piece. This was an association of Wartime pilots from all Nations who met for reunions badge shows both Allied and German insignia. Framed Wound Award document named to Swaab, dated September 10, 1918 with facsimile signature of Woodrow Wilson. Fantastic framed studio portrait in uniform wearing the ribbon of the DSC and 22nd Pursuit Squadron pin. Large photo of Swaab in civilian clothes with a lapel pin of the DSC. Framed group photo of Mayor of New York presenting Swaab with a model of a Spad. Large framed photo of Swaabs Spad in which he shot down most of his victories. Several original photos of Swaab in uniform, with fellow pilots and next to aircraft. 82 negatives of 22. Aero Squadron pilots, Spads, Aces, Swaab etc, many of which have been modern printed and put into a folder. Copy of The Dawn Patrol, original copy with dedication from Swaabs daughter of course Swaab was technical consultant on the film! Huge amount of supporting documentation and research in a large ring binder; recommendations for Medal of Honor and other awards, combat reports, history of 22. Aero Squadron, unit rosters etc etc. Swaabs commander, Ray Brooks, recommended him for the Medal of Honor for Swaabs first flight, as well as subsequent actions flown while Swaab was still recovering from his wounds. Brooks remembered Swaab as being an excellent chap to be with, a well-bred fellow of good background, well taken care of by the ladies in the USA. He was suave and well-educated; Jewish, but not very religious. A millionaires son, when he was 18, Swaab and his fathers chauffeur built a plane in his garage. They flipped a coin to see who would try it first and Swaab won, crashing the contraption into a wall. After installing a second seat they both managed to get the rebuilt plane into the air, and got good enough to perform simple manoeuvres for local onlookers. It was later, at the School of Aeronautics at Ohio State that Swaab learned he and the chauffeur had been doing things with our airplane that were supposed to be impossible. Swaab volunteered to fly in June, 1917, two months after war was declared and after initial training and a short stint as a flying instructor, he was assigned to the 22nd Aero on 27. August 1918, where he and a lot of other novice pilots would have to do or die in very quick order. After getting in a few practice hops, Swaab made his first combat flight on September 8, 1918. Why should I flatter myself by saying that I was frightened? N Even those words do not adequately describe my condition. Led by Brooks who had only five trips over the front under his belt, the patrol of newbieswas ordered by Capt. Bridgman to Stick togetherlearn your planesand be sure to keep inside your own lines. Swaab would be seeing the front for the first time and was to familiarize himself with landmarks. He recounted what happened during his first combat missionHe had been flying at the rear of a six-plane formation when the leader [Brooks had already turned back with engine trouble] dove away almost vertically, followed in turn by each of the others. Swaab held back, convinced that his comrades were bent on suicide. Up to that point, he had been flying Nieuports, which had all borne placards instructing their pilots never to dive at more than 120 mph, and nobody had told him that Spad 13s were much sturdier and would hold together in a vertical dive. Swaab prudently took his time coming down through a cloud, expecting to find all of his flight strewn in pieces over the countryside. Instead, he saw none of them at all. Climbing back above the clouds, Swaab flew west for 20 minutes. When next he descended through the clouds, he spotted an airfield below. Eureka, Im saved, thought Swaab. As he was coming in to land, another aircraft took off and started climbing up at him. Fortunately, I turned in, Swaab recounted, or that crazy nut would have collided with me. It was during his turn that Swaab saw a large gray cross on the tail of what he now recognized as a Fokker DVII. Unaware that a strong northeast wind had been blowing all day, he had made almost no progress in the opposite direction and had thus ended up over a German aerodrome… Swaab recovered from his shock in time to pull around on the equally surprised German and give him a burst of machine-gun fire; the Fokker went down in flames. With one of his two guns jammed and being fired on from the ground by machine gun and archie, Swaab pulled away into the sun, only to find himself being dived on by a 100 enemy planes. Actually, there were only 10, he explained but I saw each one 10 times! Swaab fired at the leader and saw his antagonist go spinning down. Breaking clear, Swaab again headed west for the nearest hole in the clouds. Just before he reached it, another Fokker got on his tail. Swaab recounted what ensued in his diary. The next instant I saw a group of about 10 Fokkers had enticed me into a game of ring-around-the-rosy, in which the object seemed to be for each one in turn to practice aerial gunnery on me! Fortune permitted me to get closer and closer to a cloudwhen one chap who worked for Buffalo Bill shooting pennies off a blind mans head mistook me for his old partnerand missedgently touching my scalp with three bullets. The cloud had come closer to me and I headed for it when an unfortunate Boche got in the way of some American-made bullets and burst into flames. I made the cloudvrilled a billion metres three times, passed away into semi-consciousness and next found myself pinned under my plane. And French was being spoken! The people argued about my nationality, forgetting that the planes occupant needed assistance until they were awakened by my saying, `Lever ici [lift here]! I knew that phrase perfectlya year of seeing it on every machine had impressed it into my mind. Between them, US units on the ground and formation of Breguet 14B2s of 96. Aero Squadron returning from a bombing mission had witnessed the entire fight and confirmed his three victories. Swaab was given up for lost by his squadron mates for two days. Even after he rejoined them, it was decided that, behind the cavalier humor, he was badly shaken up by the experience. He was therefore sent south to the mineral spa at Vittel to rest. He was soon joined there by Ray Brooks, who was in a similar condition after an epic dogfight of his ownBrooks and Swaab soon came to the conclusion that returning to the front was preferable to the depressing sight of the physical and mental casualties who arrived at Vittel by the trainfull each day. Both agreed to cut short their leave and rejoin the 22nd, which by that time had completed its operations over the St. Mihiel sector and was now flying over the even tougher Argonne Forest. Brooks Medal of Honor statement describes Swaab as still suffering from his wounds when he made his next kills. Swaab quipped, My lip (which he had badly split) was in such great shape that I was sure I would be back in the chewing-gum business a reference to Fleer, his employer before the war. Swaab would become a double ace in little more than a month–a total of 65 hours in the air. During an interview He told how: Our average flight was an hours duration. We carried a maximum of two hours fuel in the Spad and, many times, like the French, if there was a cloud in the sky we didnt fly. If we flew two hours in the day, we considered it a long day. So even the `on days were short. During that month Swaab developed, according to Brooks, into a marksman and a virtuoso pilot. You can read descriptions of Swaabs subsequent actions in the affidavits collected for Brooks Medal of Honor application on his behalf. They are now part of the Brooks Collection at the Archives of the National Air and Space Museum (I have copies or all). His recommendation and affidavits is several pages long so for times sake I will just add the Citations for Awards actually received. Swaab’s DSC came through in 1920. The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Lieutenant (Air Service) Jacques M. Swaab, United States Army Air Service, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with 22d Aero Squadron, 2d Pursuit Group, U. Army Air Service, A. Near Montfaucon, France, 28 September 1918, and in the region of Champignuelle, 27 October 1918. On September 28 Lieutenant Swaab, although himself pursued by two enemy planes, perceiving one of his comrades in distress and in danger of being shot down, dived upon the enemy plane which was directly behind that of his comrade and shot the enemy plane out of control, forcing it to withdraw. His prompt act in going to the assistance of his comrade enabled the latter to escape. On October 27 Lieutenant Swaab and another member of his group engaged in combat with seven enemy planes. In this encounter, although outnumbered, Lieutenant Swaab continued in his attack and succeeded in shooting down an enemy D. Silver Star Citation 1. By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved July 9, 1918 Bul. 1918, First Lieutenant (Air Service) Jacques M. Swaab, United States Army Air Service, is cited by the Commanding General, American Expeditionary Forces, for gallantry in action and a silver star may be placed upon the ribbon of the Victory Medals awarded him. First Lieutenant Swaab distinguished himself by gallantry in action while serving as a Pilot with the 22d Aero Squadron, 2d Pursuit Group, American Expeditionary Forces, in action near Metz, France, 8 September 1918, while on an aerial patrol over enemy lines. Silver Star Citation 2. First Lieutenant Swaab distinguished himself by gallantry in action while serving as a Pilot with the 22d Aero Squadron, 2d Pursuit Group, American Expeditionary Forces, in action near Thiaucourt, France, 31 October 1918, while leading a patrol. Notice there is no reference to Swaab’s exploit’s on September 8, 1918!!! But the citation cherry picks two of the list of dates offered by Brooks in his MOH application which did include the September 8. Among his other victories, On 23 October Swaab shot down in flames a Fokker D. VII that had just destroyed an American balloon. Evidence suggests his opponent was German 26 Victory Ace Max Näther. Of Jasta 62, who amazingly survived the terrifying ordeal. Blowing up an aircraft 2000 meters from the ground and almost being upset in the process was the experience of Swaab on 31. October 1918, his last Official victory. I was flying last man in our patrol and had just headed north east, when looking below and behind I saw an LVG heading in a westerly direction over Trieourcourt, I signalled to the pilot in front and seeing no other planes, I dived on the LVG.. It turned and headed for its own lines and climbed very rapidly. I climbed from 2000 to 3300 meters, following it and reserving my fire until within 100 feet behind and below it. We were then at between two to four miles from Verdun. Lieutenant Swaab then opened fire letting go about 260 rounds which seemed to go right through the fuselage close to the pilot and observer. When there was an explosion Said Swaab The LVG flying into pieces. The explosion shook my plane, throwing it up and momentarily out of control as I was but a short distance away. It had a dark green and black fuselage, wings, tail, white lines making cross on tail. As Commander of B Flight, 22. Aero Squadron, Swaab finished the War with 10 confirmed and up to another 7 unconfirmed Victories. He was highest scoring pilot of 22. Pursuit Group to which 22. Victories 4, 8 and 9 were shared with another pilot. He was technical advisor on Howard Hawks 1930 film, the original Dawn Patrol with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Although a lot of sites state Swaab worked on the 1938 version. He was an early member of Cross and Cockade and the main speaker at the August 17, 1962 meeting. He died a year later of heart trouble and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, his squadron mate Ray Brooks present along with other notables including General Carl Spaatz. Swaab flew a Spad XIII with the bore the name Mayer II benneth the cockpit in honour of his Father and a star for each victory placed round the units comet insignia. In the large files I have of Swaab, are copies of the recommendation by Brooks for the Congressional Medal of Honor on April 1, these are signed as approved by the board but nothing further seems to have come of actually receiving the Award. Rickenbacker himself had to lobby well into the 1920s to have his Awarded, perhaps Swaab just didnt feel it worth perusing. On another note, there are surprising similarities between Swaab and the group I also have to German fighter pilot Jakob Wolff ; both of course Jewish, both very rich and neither needed to serve and both were in the cigarette/cigar industry! PLEASE NOTE; If you have any questions and require more images please get in touch or contact me directly at jagermedals and I will send you what you need. SEE MY OTHER AUCTIONS FOR SIMILAR ITEMS. Keywords; Aircraft plane pilot jasta photos aviation medal flieger flugzeug album photoalbum fabric insignia observer rfc rnas royal flying corps raf royal air force naval air service seeflieger marineflieger medal. The item “SUPERB WW1 AMERICAN JEWISH FIGHTER ACE AVIATION MEDAL BADGE & DOCUMENTS PILOT” is in sale since Friday, May 24, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “albatrosj1″ and is located in SCOTLAND. This item can be shipped worldwide.

US Navy WW2 VBF-1 ROYAL FLUSHERS F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID’D AIR MEDAL RACK

US Navy WW2 VBF-1 ROYAL FLUSHERS F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID'D AIR MEDAL RACK

US Navy WW2 VBF-1 ROYAL FLUSHERS F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID'D AIR MEDAL RACK

US Navy WW2 VBF-1 ROYAL FLUSHERS F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID'D AIR MEDAL RACK

After establishing a fearsome reputation operating from land bases with US Marine Corps pilots in the South Pacific, a new landing approach and special training finally allowed the high performance Chance Vought F4U Corsair to be deployed from Navy carriers. The Corsair soon replaced dive bombers, torpedo planes, and Hellcats, as it could accurately deliver the same load as a dive bomber while retaining its deadly air to air capabilities. In January 1945, the Navy began establishing fighter bomber (VBF) squadrons flying the Corsair off fleet carriers. VBF-1, nicknamed the “Royal Flushers”, was assigned to USS Bennington (CV-20) after she completed repairs in the Pacific in mid-June 1945. Bennington could then better protect herself and the fleet with the air wing while wielding a powerful offensive strike package. VBF-1 flew strikes against Japanese warships and installations on the home islands until the surrender was signed in August 1945. This US Navy WW2 VBF-1 “ROYAL FLUSHERS” F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID’D AIR MEDAL RACK is in very good condition, with a small loose stitch on the front American Campaign drape, some fading to each front drape, mismatched clutches, and with some light overall spot patina and age wear evident (ALL pictured). Otherwise, the rack is in fine shape, with no other damage. Most interestingly, it consists of the Air Medal with the original “gold star” to denote a second award, American Campaign, Asiatic Pacific Campaign, WW2 Victory, and Navy Occupation Service with “ASIA” clasp, sports elegant stitching and fully intact pin posts at the upper back, and is attributed to Ens. Ensign (later Commander) Harold O. “Bo” Bosacki served as an F4U Corsair fighter pilot with VBF-1 during the squadron’s entire deployment aboard the Bennington from June to August 1945, twice earning the Air Medal for number of combat missions flown. On August 13th, 1945 Ensign Bosacki’s aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire during a strike on Central Honshu, but his rugged bird brought him home safely. A fine example of a very rare, original US Navy WW2 VBF-1 “ROYAL FLUSHERS” F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID’D AIR MEDAL RACK. The item “US Navy WW2 VBF-1 ROYAL FLUSHERS F4U CORSAIR FIGHTER PILOT ID’D AIR MEDAL RACK” is in sale since Monday, March 18, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\United States\Medals & Ribbons”. The seller is “abramsantiques” and is located in Claremont, California. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

Ww1 Rnas & Raf Pilot Air Force Cross Medal Group Sopwith Seaplane Fighter

A WW1 RNAS/RAF AIR FORCE CROSS GROUP TO A SEAPLANE PILOT WHO FLEW SOPWITH BABYS OFF THE SOUTHERN. DURING ONE PATROL IN 1917, ATTACKING A GERMAN U-BOAT. R E DEAN R. Ronald Eric Dean, a rubber planet, was born 25. September 1893, served O. C 1911-13 and then the Malay States Vol Rifles 1913-14. January 1915 he enlisted into the Royal Naval Air Service as a Petty Officer Mechanic and in April 1915 was posted to serve in the RNAS Armoured Cars branch in. Accepted for flying training in July 1915, he completed his pilot training and was recommended to fly seaplanes. He was posted as a Flight Sub-Lieutenant to RNAS Seaplane Stations Felixstowe on 19. October 1916 and Newlyn 22. At Newlyn Seaplane Station, which was 2 miles from Penzance on the tip of Cornwall, Dean would have been tasked with the arduous and dangerous work of flying anti submarine patrols over the sea with little chance of survival if their was a problem with his aircraft. As he was flying Sopwith Baby single seat fighters, it must have been lonely work also. Promoted Flight Lieutenant from April 1917, on August 16. 1917, flying Baby N1023, Lieutenant Dean had a rare U Boat contact off Lands End and dived to attack. According to his records. Dropped 65Lb bomb on submerged submarine. Explosion viewed in the water, after which pilot waited in the vicinity for over half an hour but the submarine was not sighted again. He had suffered effects from Malaria, presumably infected whilst in. But the main reason for his grounding seems to have been due to the prolonged periods he had served at high altitudes on anti submarine patrols. At Westgate, on the South East tip of England, Dean again would have again served primarily on reconnaissance and anti submarine patrols, though the proximity to the Belgium coast meant that patrols from this station were often intercepted by German seaplanes from Zeebrugge. April 1918 was again sent to Haslar hospital for treatment with a recommendation dated a month later that he was fit for flying but not at high altitudes and not in the North for 4 weeks. May 1918, Dean was attached to No4 Group, serving on the Staff of the Vice admiral Northern Patrol and directed to be instructed in flying Large Americas (Curtis Flying Boats). No further details are known of Deans service but he seems to have stayed in service beyond the end of WW1 as the RAF List for 1922 notes he was serving as a Flying Officer on the seaplane carrier HMS Pegasus. Therefore his full service from April 1918 in the RAF will be with the RAF records Office. Dean was Gazetted to be Awarded the Air Force Cross on the 1st January 1919. Only 678 of which were awarded for the First World War. Initially Dean seems to have flown Short 184 seaplanes but by at least April 1917 was flying single seater Sopwith Babys. Notes in his service papers say he was training to flying large. S at some point after May 1918. A very good AFC with all RNAS named medals. Includes copies of enlistment/RNAS service papers, Operations Report, copies of Gazettes, RN Aircraft Serials (detailing activity in all RN Aircraft), RAF Lists etc but as mentioned above, really needs some in depth research for service post April 1918, which may well give an idea of why he was awarded the AFC. Condition NEF Ex DNW 2000. PLEASE NOTE; If you have any questions and require more images please get in touch. SEE MY OTHER AUCTIONS FOR SIMILAR ITEMS. The item “WW1 RNAS & RAF PILOT AIR FORCE CROSS MEDAL GROUP SOPWITH SEAPLANE FIGHTER” is in sale since Friday, July 20, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “albatrosj1″ and is located in SCOTLAND. This item can be shipped worldwide.

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot

Offered today is an original set of Luftwaffe clasps that came from a retired German immigrant along with a set of his Luftschutz bund documents. These pieces are unmarked but sport amazing detail with fully function clasps. I will be listing other items from this estate so please keep a lookout! Thank you and let me know if you have any questions. The item “WW1 German Luftwaffe Fighter and Recon Clasp, Medal, Badge, Pin, Lot” is in sale since Friday, June 1, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “militariasales2017″ and is located in Fort Sill, Oklahoma. This item can be shipped worldwide.

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE

Awarded for HEROISM AGAINST GERMAN NAZI FORCES TO U. ARMY AIR FORCES PILOT ALBERT M McFARALANE. WW2 DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS correctly named on reverse, WW2 AIR MEDAL correctly named on reverse. Medals come in black WW2 coffin type Presentation Case marked Distinguished Flying Cross, also included Ribbon Bar and V for Valor attachments. Pilots original WW2 STERLING SILVER WINGS hallmarked on reverse LGB STERLING. An outstanding WW2 U. The item “WW2 U. S. ARMY FIGHTER PILOT MEDAL GROUP PLUS WINGS NAMED TO ALBERT M. McFARLANE” is in sale since Saturday, March 31, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1939 – 1945 (WWII)”. The seller is “elitemilitaria” and is located in QLD.. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Authenticity: Original
  • Country: * UNITED STATES *
  • Campaign: * WORLD WAR 2 *
  • Product Type: * MEDAL *
  • Era: 1940s

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

A SUPERBLY WELL DOCUMENTED WW1 24 SQUADRON ROYAL FLYING CORPS ORIGINAL FIGHTER PILOT CASUALTY DOCUMENTS AND MEDALS GROUP. INCLUDES CONDOLENCE LETTER FROM MAJOR HAWKER VC. Was born in Rushden, in August 1893, the only son of Mr and Mrs A. Cave of The Hutt. He was educated at. And prior to the war was employed on the literary staff of the Northampton Daily Echo; Northampton Independent and on the editorial staff of The Yorkshire Observer. Cave attested for the Royal Flying Corps in July 1915, carried out his flying training at Brooklands, and obtained his Aviators Certificate as well as his commission on his birthday – 9 August 1915. He was posted for operational flying to 24 Squadron DH. S first single seater fighter squadron, which was being formed in the. First ace Major Lanoe Hawker VC. Flew across the channel with the squadron when they first became operational, serving with them in the French theatre of war from 6 February 1916. He wrote of his initial experiences in a letter to his parents, dated 7 February 1916. My Dear All, We arrived here today in a howling gale, yesterday evening quite unfit for flying because of rain. Four of the machines crashed more others badly at Folkestone & at present only just over half the Squadron have arrived. We have to go out on patrol duty over the lines tomorrow all day, and as we are so short handed it means rather a heavy job. However, will write you later. S ix days later Cave was killed in a flying accident. On 14 February his C. Major Lanoe Hawker, V. Wrote to the following to Caves mother. Permit me first, on behalf of myself and the whole of no 24 Squadron, to express our deepest sympathy with you in your sad bereavement. This Squadron, as you probably know, is equipped with fast Scouts, which are undoubtedly very tricky to fly. Your son however, was a good pilot, and handled the machine very well. Unfortunately, while planing down to land about 4 oclock yesterday afternoon, he made too steep a turn, the machine got out of control, and dived to the ground before he had time to recover control again. Help arrived within 2 minutes of the accident, but there was nothing to do – death was instantaneous:- at least he did not suffer any pain… The crash was to prove a turning point for the Squadron, as related in Hawker, V. In the chapter Arrival in. The 13th of February turned out to be a critical day for the squadron. Cave on his way back from a patrol got into a spin, crashed and was killed on the neighbouring aerodrome occupied by No. Two of his best pilots, for to Lanoe all his pilots were his best, were killed before a shot had been fired at the enemy. Lanoe, with his ready sympathy, felt their loss acutely. 2 was living up to his evil reputation… His squadron had reached a crisis. 2 out of a spin when once it started. So far it was considered fatal to get the DH. 2 into a spin, and the pilots had taken great pains to avoid it… And that the machine was a death trap. Listening quietly, Lanoe realised that the fighting value of his squadron was in peril. His was the first squadron of DH. 2s, and there was a possibility of his pilots losing confidence in their machines in which case the morale of the squadron was gone… Without a word Lanoe left the mess and ordered out a machine, climbed to 8,000 feet and deliberately threw it into a spin. If he failed to get it out of a spin… But Lanoe never thought of failure. Putting his theories in practise he recovered from the spin without difficulty. He tried again and again, with engine on, with engine off, left spin, right spin…. Down Lanoe came to the aerodrome and radiating confidence he walked briskly into the mess. Its all right, you fellows, he said, You can get the DH. 2 out of any spin. I have just tried it out. The pilots gathered eagerly around him, and he carefully explained the correct manoeuvres until they all understood them clearly, but he warned them above everything not to get into a spin near the ground. Out they all went to follow his example. It was an anxious moment, for another crash might have shaken irreparably the confidence of his pilots, but all went well… Cave was buried quietly originally at. And then moved to Terlincthun British Cemtery, Wimille and, though Lanoe showed a brave face to his squadron, he carried a heavy heart. After four months of school work at Hounslow without an injury to anyone, we have struck some dreadfully bad luck – one of my lads was killed on Wednesday, and another again today, two in a week is really too terrible, and both flying accidents. I have such nice keen lads, and it does seem such a pity and it is such a waste, and I have to write to their people as their commanding officer. THE GROUP CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS, MEDALS AND MILITARIA. A Commission appointing Eric Arthur Cave Second Lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, Royal Flying Corps, military Wing, dated 9 August 1915; with its original envelope. B Federation Aeronautique International British Empire Aviators Certificate, numbered 1546, and dated 9 August 1915; with photo of Cave and signiature. C Royal Flying Corps (Officers) Certificate A, dated 28 October 1915. D Letter from recipient addressed to his parents, dated 7 February 1916. E Half-written letter to recipients parents, dated 12 February 1916, additionally annotated This was in Erics kit. F Original handwritten letter of Condolence to recipients mother from Major L. Commanding Officer 24 Squadron, dated 14 February 1916. G Original Director of Graves Registration card with photo of Caves original wartime grave (wooden cross) and description of where it was. H Original Card with photo of immediate post war Caves grave with standard stone gravestone. I Caves British War and Victory medals, mint condition with paper medal packets, paper describing how to apply ribbons and Boxes of issue (sides flattened but complete). Both medals named 2. J Caves memorial scroll (as sent with medals), with. Condolence in original OHMS postal tube. K Large roll of Honour Scroll, showing major Commonwealth cemeterys, named to recipient, along with its smaller Overseas Ex-Service Mens Association covering letter. These sent to family to tell them what memorial their deceaseds name is carved on. L Three Calling Cards, two for pre-war employment and named to recipient as of the Northampton Independent and The Yorkshire Observer. M Newspaper cuttings relating to Caves death and several other items of ephemera. N Portrait photo of Cave in RFC uniform. The above mostly in modern clear pages folder, along with a good deal of copy research, MIC and modern photos of grave/cemetery. A quite superb and poignant group to one of. S original fighter pilots. S parents clearly kept everything relating to his service and death and there a some very rare War graves/memorial documentation of the type not often seen. As well as letters from the young pilot just prior to his death, the original signed letter by Major Hawker. S first great Ace, is incredibly rare. Hawker himself was shot down By Von Richthofen in November 1918. PLEASE NOTE; If you have any questions and require more images please get in touch. SEE MY OTHER AUCTIONS FOR SIMILAR ITEMS. The item “LARGE GROUP WW1 ROYAL FLYING CORPS FIGHTER PILOT CASUALTY DOCUMENTS & MEDALS” is in sale since Monday, October 09, 2017. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “albatrosj1″ and is located in SCOTLAND. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

Large Group Ww1 Royal Flying Corps Fighter Pilot Casualty Documents & Medals

A SUPERBLY WELL DOCUMENTED WW1 24 SQUADRON ROYAL FLYING CORPS ORIGINAL FIGHTER PILOT CASUALTY DOCUMENTS AND MEDALS GROUP. INCLUDES CONDOLENCE LETTER FROM MAJOR HAWKER VC. Was born in Rushden, in August 1893, the only son of Mr and Mrs A. Cave of The Hutt. He was educated at. And prior to the war was employed on the literary staff of the Northampton Daily Echo; Northampton Independent and on the editorial staff of The Yorkshire Observer. Cave attested for the Royal Flying Corps in July 1915, carried out his flying training at Brooklands, and obtained his Aviators Certificate as well as his commission on his birthday – 9 August 1915. He was posted for operational flying to 24 Squadron DH. S first single seater fighter squadron, which was being formed in the. First ace Major Lanoe Hawker VC. Flew across the channel with the squadron when they first became operational, serving with them in the French theatre of war from 6 February 1916. He wrote of his initial experiences in a letter to his parents, dated 7 February 1916. My Dear All, We arrived here today in a howling gale, yesterday evening quite unfit for flying because of rain. Four of the machines crashed more others badly at Folkestone & at present only just over half the Squadron have arrived. We have to go out on patrol duty over the lines tomorrow all day, and as we are so short handed it means rather a heavy job. However, will write you later. S ix days later Cave was killed in a flying accident. On 14 February his C. Major Lanoe Hawker, V. Wrote to the following to Caves mother. Permit me first, on behalf of myself and the whole of no 24 Squadron, to express our deepest sympathy with you in your sad bereavement. This Squadron, as you probably know, is equipped with fast Scouts, which are undoubtedly very tricky to fly. Your son however, was a good pilot, and handled the machine very well. Unfortunately, while planing down to land about 4 oclock yesterday afternoon, he made too steep a turn, the machine got out of control, and dived to the ground before he had time to recover control again. Help arrived within 2 minutes of the accident, but there was nothing to do – death was instantaneous:- at least he did not suffer any pain… The crash was to prove a turning point for the Squadron, as related in Hawker, V. In the chapter Arrival in. The 13th of February turned out to be a critical day for the squadron. Cave on his way back from a patrol got into a spin, crashed and was killed on the neighbouring aerodrome occupied by No. Two of his best pilots, for to Lanoe all his pilots were his best, were killed before a shot had been fired at the enemy. Lanoe, with his ready sympathy, felt their loss acutely. 2 was living up to his evil reputation… His squadron had reached a crisis. 2 out of a spin when once it started. So far it was considered fatal to get the DH. 2 into a spin, and the pilots had taken great pains to avoid it… And that the machine was a death trap. Listening quietly, Lanoe realised that the fighting value of his squadron was in peril. His was the first squadron of DH. 2s, and there was a possibility of his pilots losing confidence in their machines in which case the morale of the squadron was gone… Without a word Lanoe left the mess and ordered out a machine, climbed to 8,000 feet and deliberately threw it into a spin. If he failed to get it out of a spin… But Lanoe never thought of failure. Putting his theories in practise he recovered from the spin without difficulty. He tried again and again, with engine on, with engine off, left spin, right spin…. Down Lanoe came to the aerodrome and radiating confidence he walked briskly into the mess. Its all right, you fellows, he said, You can get the DH. 2 out of any spin. I have just tried it out. The pilots gathered eagerly around him, and he carefully explained the correct manoeuvres until they all understood them clearly, but he warned them above everything not to get into a spin near the ground. Out they all went to follow his example. It was an anxious moment, for another crash might have shaken irreparably the confidence of his pilots, but all went well… Cave was buried quietly originally at. And then moved to Terlincthun British Cemtery, Wimille and, though Lanoe showed a brave face to his squadron, he carried a heavy heart. After four months of school work at Hounslow without an injury to anyone, we have struck some dreadfully bad luck – one of my lads was killed on Wednesday, and another again today, two in a week is really too terrible, and both flying accidents. I have such nice keen lads, and it does seem such a pity and it is such a waste, and I have to write to their people as their commanding officer. THE GROUP CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS, MEDALS AND MILITARIA. A Commission appointing Eric Arthur Cave Second Lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, Royal Flying Corps, military Wing, dated 9 August 1915; with its original envelope. B Federation Aeronautique International British Empire Aviators Certificate, numbered 1546, and dated 9 August 1915; with photo of Cave and signiature. C Royal Flying Corps (Officers) Certificate A, dated 28 October 1915. D Letter from recipient addressed to his parents, dated 7 February 1916. E Half-written letter to recipients parents, dated 12 February 1916, additionally annotated This was in Erics kit. F Original handwritten letter of Condolence to recipients mother from Major L. Commanding Officer 24 Squadron, dated 14 February 1916. G Original Director of Graves Registration card with photo of Caves original wartime grave (wooden cross) and description of where it was. H Original Card with photo of immediate post war Caves grave with standard stone gravestone. I Caves British War and Victory medals, mint condition with paper medal packets, paper describing how to apply ribbons and Boxes of issue (sides flattened but complete). Both medals named 2. J Caves memorial scroll (as sent with medals), with. Condolence in original OHMS postal tube. K Large roll of Honour Scroll, showing major Commonwealth cemeterys, named to recipient, along with its smaller Overseas Ex-Service Mens Association covering letter. These sent to family to tell them what memorial their deceaseds name is carved on. L Three Calling Cards, two for pre-war employment and named to recipient as of the Northampton Independent and The Yorkshire Observer. M Newspaper cuttings relating to Caves death and several other items of ephemera. N Portrait photo of Cave in RFC uniform. The above mostly in modern clear pages folder, along with a good deal of copy research, MIC and modern photos of grave/cemetery. A quite superb and poignant group to one of. S original fighter pilots. S parents clearly kept everything relating to his service and death and there a some very rare War graves/memorial documentation of the type not often seen. As well as letters from the young pilot just prior to his death, the original signed letter by Major Hawker. S first great Ace, is incredibly rare. Hawker himself was shot down By Von Richthofen in November 1918. PLEASE NOTE; If you have any questions and require more images please get in touch or contact me directly at jagermedals and I will send you what you need. SEE MY OTHER AUCTIONS FOR SIMILAR ITEMS. The item “LARGE GROUP WW1 ROYAL FLYING CORPS FIGHTER PILOT CASUALTY DOCUMENTS & MEDALS” is in sale since Sunday, September 10, 2017. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “albatrosj1″ and is located in SCOTLAND. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Conflict: World War I (1914-1918)

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

SEE OUR STORE FOR MORE ITEMS OF INTEREST BRITISH WORLD WAR 2 SERVICE MEDAL GROUP TO FLIGHT SERGEANT WITH NO. 3 FIGHTER SQUADRON SOUTH AFRICAN AIR FORCE 1939-45 Star officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; Africa Star officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels with “North Africa 1942-43″ Bar; Italy Star officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; British Defence Medal officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; British 1939-45 War Medal officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; South African Service Medal, 1939-45 Silver, officially impressed: 116104 H. The British 1939-45 Star was awarded to any military personnel serving for six months in an operational command between September 3, 1939, and September 2, 1945. Operational service brought to an end through death, disability, or wound, also qualified for the award of the 1939-45 Star, irrespective of length of service. The British Africa Star was awarded to military personnel who served in North Africa or the Mediterean between June 10, 1940, and May12 , 1943. The “North Africa 1942-43″ Bar to the British Africa Star was awarded to military personnel who served in North Africa or the Mediterean between October 23, 1942, and May12 , 1943. The British Italy Star was awarded to military personnel who served in Italy between June 11, 1943, and May 8, 1945. The British Defence Medal was awarded to service personnel for one year service in India. The British 1939-45 War Medal was awarded to all full time personnel of the Armed Forces serving for 28 days or more, between September 3, 1939, and September 2, 1945. The South African Service Medal, 1939-45 was awarded for 30 days service in World War 2. The medals come with official ribbons and in extremely fine condition. AB0136 Digital photos were taken in artificial light, and do not always show colors properly. The item “BRITISH WORLD WAR 2 MEDAL GROUP 3 FIGHTER SQUADRON S AFRICAN AIR FORCE AB0136″ is in sale since Monday, June 05, 2017. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\Great Britain\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “surlamer86″ and is located in Bellevue, Washington. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Era: World War 2
  • Product: War Medals
  • Country: South Africa – Great Britain

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

British World War 2 Medal Group 3 Fighter Squadron S African Air Force Ab0136

SEE OUR STORE FOR MORE ITEMS OF INTEREST BRITISH WORLD WAR 2 SERVICE MEDAL GROUP TO FLIGHT SERGEANT WITH NO. 3 FIGHTER SQUADRON SOUTH AFRICAN AIR FORCE 1939-45 Star officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; Africa Star officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels with “North Africa 1942-43″ Bar; Italy Star officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; British Defence Medal officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; British 1939-45 War Medal officially impressed: 116104 H. Daniels; South African Service Medal, 1939-45 Silver, officially impressed: 116104 H. The British 1939-45 Star was awarded to any military personnel serving for six months in an operational command between September 3, 1939, and September 2, 1945. Operational service brought to an end through death, disability, or wound, also qualified for the award of the 1939-45 Star, irrespective of length of service. The British Africa Star was awarded to military personnel who served in North Africa or the Mediterean between June 10, 1940, and May12 , 1943. The “North Africa 1942-43″ Bar to the British Africa Star was awarded to military personnel who served in North Africa or the Mediterean between October 23, 1942, and May12 , 1943. The British Italy Star was awarded to military personnel who served in Italy between June 11, 1943, and May 8, 1945. The British Defence Medal was awarded to service personnel for one year service in India. The British 1939-45 War Medal was awarded to all full time personnel of the Armed Forces serving for 28 days or more, between September 3, 1939, and September 2, 1945. The South African Service Medal, 1939-45 was awarded for 30 days service in World War 2. The medals come with official ribbons and in extremely fine condition. AB0136 Digital photos were taken in artificial light, and do not always show colors properly. The item “BRITISH WORLD WAR 2 MEDAL GROUP 3 FIGHTER SQUADRON S AFRICAN AIR FORCE AB0136″ is in sale since Friday, May 05, 2017. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\Great Britain\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “surlamer86″ and is located in Bellevue, Washington. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Era: World War 2
  • Product: War Medals
  • Country: South Africa – Great Britain