Archive for the german Category

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy

German prussia WW I submarine badge of Reichsmarine. And a recall clasp from 25 years prussia war soldier. Stamp of producer back side of medal. Additional photos in this discription for sure check. The badge was made to a high quality. An exceptionally fine example for a fine collection. The badge has signs of wear and is in good condition. The medal comes from a very old collection and is rare. We took good photos for you. Please ask us beforehand whether we can deliver to your country without problems. We can send to the USA with UPS. If you have any questions, please send us a message. TRIXUM: Mobil-optimierte Auktionsvorlagen und Bilder-Hosting. The item “German prussia WW I submarine medal original 1914-1918 and clasp of recall Navy” is in sale since Sunday, October 10, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “preussen1901″ and is located in Dorsten. This item can be shipped worldwide.

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902

Original pre WW1 German mounted China Campaign Medal (China-Denkmünze) – 1902, THE AWARD IS IN GOOD WORN CONDITION WITH PARTLY LOST FINISH, ON GENUINE RIBBON , INTACT PIN DEVICE, A FINE UNCLEANED EXAMPLE, A RARE AWARD. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. China Campaign Medal (China-Denkmünze) was instituted on May 10, 1901 by the German emperor and king of Prussia Wilhelm II as a decoration of his subjects regardless of gender who participated in suppression of Boxer Rebellion (also known as Boxer Uprising or Yihetuan Movement) between May 30, 1900 and June 29, 1901. The following categories were eligible for China Campaign Medal: military personnel of army and navy; non-combatants, i. Frontline soldiers were decorated with China Campaign Medal for military personnel (China-Denkmünze für Kämpfer) that was made of brass or gilt copper. China Campaign Medal for non-combatants (China-Denkmünze für Nicht-Kämpfer) made of polished steel, silvered brass and silver was awarded to non-combatants. Silver medals were unofficial having been struck by private manufacturers. Design of the medal was made by a sculptor from Berlin Walter Schott (18.09.1861 02.09.1938) based on a project prepared by Wilhelm II himself. China Campaign Medal is a typically drop-shaped one, 35×32 mm with a hole for suspension in its upper part. Obverse of both types of medal was encircled by a laurel wreath and showed an allegoric composition of a victorious crowned German eagle with spread wings holding a defeated Chinese dragon in its claws. Reverse of the China Campaign Medal for military personnel was encircled by a laurel wreath and had a crowned cipher of Wilhelm II placed in the centre and two inscriptions: To the victorious fighters (Den Siegreichen Streitern) in its upper part and 1900 China 1901 below. Reverse of the China Campaign Medal for non-combatants was encircled by a laurel wreath and had a crowned cipher of Wilhelm II placed in the centre and inscription For the service during an expedition to China (Verdienst um die Expedition nach China) as well as a small five-pointed star at the bottom. Ribbon was white with central wide yellow vertical stripe and two thinner black and red stripes at both edges. Approximate number of awards: 50,000 (combatant medal) and 6,000 (non-combatant medal). Battle clasp could not be worn with the non-combatant medal and even if non-combatant was theoretically eligible for a honour bar according to his service records he or she was decorated by a steel type of a medal only. It was a case of some medical and supply personnel. Nevertheless violations of the above-mentioned regulations are widely known. Theres photographic evidence of wearing of battle clasps on ribbon of medals for non-combatants, wearing of specific battle clasps by unauthorized military personnel, e. Illegal wearing of Peking bar that was initially introduced for 251 soldiers only from III Seebataillon who served under Leutnant Graf von Soden at the siege of the foreign legations in Peking. Totally 13 battle clasps were instituted officially: FOUPHING, HOPHU, HUOLU, KALGAN, KAUMI, KITCHOU, LIANG-HSIANG-HSIEN, PEITANG-FORTS, PEKING, SEYMOURE-EXPEDITION, TAKU, TIENTSIN, TSEKINGKWAN. As a rule wearing of a single clasp is quite rare since most medals are accompanied with several bars. Due to a number of manufacturers these unofficial clasps differed in script used, height and size of letters as well as in distance between letters. Some bars were even privately engraved in fine calligraphic italic letters. Two different attachment methods existed: slip-on and by prongs of various types. The item “10270 German pre WW1 mounted China Campaign Medal combatant Denkmünze 1902″ is in sale since Wednesday, March 31, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in ST. ALBANS. This item can be shipped worldwide.

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

Ww2 German Brown Shirt Sa 1939 Medal

WW2 GERMAN SA 1939 MEDAL. WW2 GERMAN SA BROWN SHIRT 1939 AWARD MEDAL. ITS THE ONLY ONE I EVER SEEN. IVE ONLY SEEN THE PIN BACK VERSION ONLINE A FEW TIMES. BLACK / UV LIGHT TESTED NO GLOW PRE 1943. The item “WW2 GERMAN BROWN SHIRT SA 1939 MEDAL” is in sale since Saturday, August 28, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “mastermason.32″ and is located in El Mirage, Arizona. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Type: Medal
  • Conflict: WW II (1939-45)
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Region of Origin: Germany
  • Modified Item: No

Ww2 German Collection Medals

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp

Paratrooper badge from the German Air Force WW II. Badge came from old company Assmann (A). We have added more beautiful photos here in the description. The order is exceptionally rare and very nice for collectors of parachutists. The badge was worn. The eagle was beautifully embossed. The badge has signs of wear and is in good condition. The medal comes from a very old collection and is rare. We took good photos for you. Please ask us beforehand whether we can deliver to your country without problems. We can send to the USA with UPS. If you have any questions, please send us a message. TRIXUM: Mobil-optimierte Auktionsvorlagen und Bilder-Hosting. The item “German WW II airborne paratrooper badge medal air force stamp from Assmann stamp” is in sale since Tuesday, August 24, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW I (1914-18)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “preussen1901″ and is located in Dorsten. This item can be shipped worldwide.

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er

For consideration is a post WW2 Iron Cross First Class, 1957 issue. This medal is a three piece silver frame construction , with a magnetic core. Has nice patina on the frame. Thai medal is in great condition and will display well. These were distributed to German vets after ww2. The item “German Iron Cross First Class WW2 57er” is in sale since Tuesday, August 17, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\WW II (1939-45)\Original Period Items\Germany\Medals, Pins & Ribbons”. The seller is “daveo0784″ and is located in Toms River, New Jersey. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Type: Medal
  • Conflict: WW II (1939-45)
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Region of Origin: Germany
  • Modified Item: No

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core

Original German Iron Cross II. Class – WW1, NICE CONDITION, THREE PIECE CONSTRUCTION, MAGNETIC CORE – GOOD EXAMPLE, NICE FINISH ON THE CORE, ON NEW COMBATANT RIBBON, A VERY NICE PIECE. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. Among the holders of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class was Adolf Hitler, who held the rank of Gefreiter. Hitler can be seen wearing the award on his left breast, as was standard, in many photographs. The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, the emblem of the Wehrmacht, first used in a narrower form on Luftstreitkräfte aircraft in mid-April 1918, and as shown here, as it appeared on German planes, tanks, and other vehicles during the Second World War. Adolf Hitler restored the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German decoration (rather than Prussian as in earlier versions), continuing the tradition of issuing it in various grades. Legally it is based on the enactment Reichsgesetzblatt I S. 1573 of 1 September 1939 Verordnung über die Erneuerung des Eisernen Kreuzes (Regulation for the Re-introduction of the Iron Cross). The Iron Cross of the Second World War was divided into three main series of decorations with an intermediate category, the Knight’s Cross, instituted between the lowest, the Iron Cross, and the highest, the Grand Cross. The Knight’s Cross replaced the Prussian Pour le Mérite or “Blue Max”. Hitler did not care for the Pour le Mérite, as it was a Prussian order that could be awarded only to officers. The ribbon of the medal (2nd class and Knight’s Cross) was different from the earlier Iron Crosses in that the color red was used in addition to the traditional black and white (black and white were the colours of Prussia, while black, white, and red were the colors of Germany). Hitler also created the War Merit Cross as a replacement for the non-combatant version of the Iron Cross. It also appeared on certain Nazi flags in the upper left corner. The edges were curved, like most original iron crosses. The standard 1939 Iron Cross was issued in the following two grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse abbreviated as EKI or E. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: when in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar, for everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross First Class was a pin-on medal with no ribbon and was worn centered on a uniform breast pocket, either on dress uniforms or everyday outfit. It was a progressive award, with the second class having to be earned before the first class and so on for the higher degrees. It is estimated that some four and a half million Second Class Iron Crosses were awarded in the Second World War, and 300,000 of the First Class. The item “9361 German WW1 Iron Cross II. Class medal Eisernes Kreuz magnetic core” is in sale since Wednesday, March 31, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War I (1914-1918)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in ST. ALBANS. This item can be shipped worldwide.

WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original

WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original

WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original

WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original

WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original

WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original

A very good and hard to find “Original” group of eight! (from my personal collection). An extensive First War period medal bar featuring eight decorations, including a. 1914 Iron Cross II Class, constructed of iron and silver, on loop for suspension from its period original ribbon, consisting of a Cross Pattée with a blackened magnetic iron core within a ribbed silver frame, the obverse with a central initial W, the six oclock arm with a reinstitution date of 1914, the twelve oclock arm with a royal crown, the reverse with three central oak leaves, the six oclock arm with an initial institution date of 1813, the twelve oclock arm with initials FW topped by a royal crown, unmarked, measuring 42.72mm (w) x 46.59 mm (h), in extremely fine condition. A Württemberg Military Merit Medal, constructed of silver, on loop for suspension from its period original ribbon, he obverse with a rightward-facing profile of Wilhelm II of Württemberg circumscribed by name and title, the reverse with an inscription of FÜR TAPFERKEIT UND TREUE (FOR BRAVERY AND LOYALTY), unmarked, measuring 28.27 mm in diameter, in very fine condition. A Friedrich-August Cross, constructed of magnetic metal, on loop for suspension from its period original ribbon, consisting of a Cross Pattée, the obverse with a central monogram of Friedrich August, the six oclock arm with a date of 1914 the twelve oclock arm with a royal cross, the reverse plain, unmarked, measuring 39.33 mm (w) x 43.89 mm (h), in very fine condition. A Hamburg Hanseatic Cross, constructed of silver with enamels, on loop for suspension from its period original ribbon, consisting of a Cross Pattée, the obverse with red enameled arms, with a red enameled centerpiece bearing a silver Holstentor, the reverse with a central raised inscription of FÜR VERDIENST IM KRIEGE 1914, unmarked, measuring 40.03 mm (w) x 43.89 mm (h), in near extremely fine condition. A German Honour Legion Medal, constructed of gilded bronze, on loop for suspension from its period original ribbon with combatants clasp, the obverse with a raised angel crowning a German soldier, the reverse with an Iron Cross topped by an inscription of FÜRG DAGERLAND and above an oak leaf wreath, unmarked, measuring 32.01 mm (w) x 36.10 mm (h), in near extremely fine condition. A Austrian Merit Cross with Crown, constructed of bronze with multi-coloured enamels, on a crown loop for suspension from its period original ribbon, consisting of a Ruppert Cross, with red enameled arms, the obverse with a central white enameled medallion bearing a gilt monogram of Franz Joseph I circumscribed by a gilt inscription of VIRIBUS UNITIS (UNITED FORCES), the reverse with a white enameled medallion bearing a gilt date of 1849, unmarked, measuring 36.38 mm (w) x 56.57 mm (h), better than very fine condition. A Bulgarian Order of Saint Alexander, V Class Cross, constructed of silver with multi-coloured enamels, on loop for suspension from its period original ribbon, consisting of a Cross Pattée with white enameled arms, the obverse with a central red enameled medallion bearing a gilt order named circumscribed by a white enameled ring inscribed (GOD WITH US), the reverse with a central white enameled medallion with an institution date of 19 1878 (19 FEBRUARY 1878), unmarked, measuring 38.75 mm (w) x 46.15 mm (h), in near extremely fine condition; all set on a 220 mm-long magnetic metal bar with a horizontal pinback. The item “WW1 German, 8 Medal Group, Original” is in sale since Tuesday, July 27, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\1914 – 1918 (WWI)”. The seller is “1813waterloo” and is located in Highbury, SA. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Campaign: World War I
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Country: Germany
  • Product Type: Medals
  • Era: 1910s

WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon

WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon

WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon

WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon

WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon

WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon. Domestic UK – 2nd class signed for. The item you see is the item you will receive. Please check pictures carefully as these form part of the description. The item “WW2 German war medal eastern front 1941/42 with ribbon” is in sale since Monday, August 9, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “bluehippocollectables” and is located in Royston. This item can be shipped to United Kingdom, Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Australia, United States, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Norway, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Iceland, Jersey, Liechtenstein, Monaco.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Germany
  • Country/ Organization: Germany
  • Issued/ Not-Issued: Issued
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Type: Medals & Ribbons
  • Conflict: World War II (1939-1945)
  • Service: Army
  • Era: 1914-1945

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER

Original German Iron Cross First Class post WW2 version / 1957 pattern (no swastika), NICE CONDITION – THREE PIECE CONSTRUCTION, MAGNETIC CORE, GENUINE RARE DEUMER MADE EXAMPLE, HARD TO FIND – REALLY GOOD PIECE WITH SOME TEAR AND WEAR, THERE IS A PAINT DAMAGE ON THE UPPER ARM, ALSO THERE ARE SOME LETTERS SCRATCHED ON THE REVERSE. FEW FACTS ABOUT THE 1957 PATTERN AWARDS. In 1957 the West German government authorised replacement Iron Crosses with an Oak Leaf Cluster in place of the swastika, similar to the Iron Crosses of 1813, 1870, and 1914, which could be worn by World War II Iron Cross recipients. The 1957 law also authorised de-Nazified versions of most other World War IIera decorations (except those specifically associated with Nazi Party organizations, such as SS Long Service medals, or with the expansion of the German Reich, such as the medals for the annexation of Austria, the Sudetenland, and the Memel region). The main government contract to manufacture and supply these new de-nazified WW2 1957 official decorations went to the world famous German firm Steinhauer & Lueck, Luedenscheid Germany. Knights Crosses, Iron Crosses , Wound Badges, Tank Assault Badges etc were re-designed by Steinhauer & Lück – often with the oak-leaf spray replacing the swastika, with S&L having the sole patent rights to all WW2 1957 German decorations. S&L did not have the whole monopoly on medal making, other famous firms such as Deschler & Sohn, BH Maher and Juncker also manufactured these new German decorations. Lüdenscheid is situated between the cities Dortmund and Bonn. It was here that one of the youngest medal firms was founded in 1889 by August Steinhauer and Gustav Adolf Lück. The first production began in a cellar, the customer base continued to increase. A property was bought at 51 Hochstrasse which is still home for this famous company today. During WW2 Steinhauer & Lück produced medals and badges, like the famous Knights Cross and many other types of medals and badges. In 1957 this company was awarded the contract to produce all the newly re-designed legal WW2 1957 de-nazified decorations, plus the contract to manufacture all of Germany’s official decorations including Germany’s highest order the Bundesverdienstkreuz. Only a very limited number of original WW2 1957 medals are still produced, mainly Iron Crosses, German Cross Gold & Silver & Wound Badges and are considered 100% genuine by the German Government. HISTORY OF THE AWARD. Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) was a military decoration of the Kingdom of Prussia, and later of Germany, which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau. In addition to during the Napoleonic Wars, the Iron Cross was awarded during the Franco-German War, the First World War, and the Second World War. The Iron Cross was normally a military decoration only, though there were instances of it being awarded to civilians for performing military functions. Two examples, the civilian pilot Hanna Reitsch was awarded the Iron Cross First Class for her bravery as a test pilot during the Second World War and Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (also a German female test pilot) was awarded the Iron Cross Second Class. The Iron Cross was also used as the symbol of the German Army from 1871 to 1915, when it was replaced by a simpler Greek cross. In 1956, the Iron Cross became the symbol of the Bundeswehr, the German armed forces. The traditional design is black and this design is used on armored vehicles and aircraft. A newer design in blue and silver is used as the emblem in other contexts. The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening towards the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century. The ribbon for the 1813, 1870 and 1914 Iron Cross (2nd Class) was black with two thin white bands, the colours of Prussia. The noncombatant version of this award had the same medal, but the black and white colours on the ribbon were reversed. Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented. Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year “1914″, while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated “1939″. The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year “1813″ appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials “FW” for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a “W” for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. It was also possible for a holder of the 1914 Iron Cross to be awarded a second or higher grade of the 1939 Iron Cross. In such cases, a “1939 Clasp” (Spange) would be worn on the original 1914 Iron Cross. A similar award was made in 1914 but was quite rare, since there were few in service who held the 1870 Iron Cross. For the First Class award the Spange appears as an eagle with the date “1939″ that was pinned above the Cross. Although two separate awards, in some cases the holders soldered them together. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany’s armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. The Iron Cross was founded on 10 March 1813 in Breslau and awarded to soldiers during the Wars of Liberation against Napoleon. It was first awarded to Karl August Ferdinand von Borcke on 21 April 1813. King Wilhelm I of Prussia authorized further awards on 19 July 1870, during the Franco-German War. The Iron Cross was reauthorized by Emperor Wilhelm II on 5 August 1914, at the start of the First World War. During these three periods, the Iron Cross was an award of the Kingdom of Prussia, although given Prussia’s pre-eminent place in the German Empire formed in 1871, it tended to be treated as a generic German decoration. The 1813, 1870, and 1914 Iron Crosses had three grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class German: Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse, Grand Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Großkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes, often simply Großkreuz). Although the medals of each class were identical, the manner in which each was worn differed. Employing a pin or screw posts on the back of the medal, the Iron Cross First Class was worn on the left side of the recipient’s uniform. The Grand Cross and the Iron Cross Second Class were suspended from different ribbons. The Grand Cross was intended for senior generals of the German Army. An even higher decoration, the Star of the Grand Cross of the Iron Cross, was awarded only twice, to Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher in 1813 and to Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1918. A third award was planned for the most successful German general during the Second World War, but was not made after the defeat of Germany in 1945. The Iron Cross 1st Class and the Iron Cross 2nd Class were awarded without regard to rank. One had to already possess the 2nd Class in order to receive the 1st Class (though in some cases both could be awarded simultaneously). The egalitarian nature of this award contrasted with those of most other German states (and indeed many other European monarchies), where military decorations were awarded based on the rank of the recipient. For example, Bavarian officers received various grades of that Kingdom’s Military Merit Order (Militär-Verdienstorden), while enlisted men received various grades of the Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz). Prussia did have other orders and medals which were awarded on the basis of rank, and even though the Iron Cross was intended to be awarded without regard to rank, officers and NCOs were more likely to receive it than junior enlisted soldiers. In the First World War, approximately four million Iron Crosses of the lower grade (2nd Class) were issued, as well as around 145,000 of the higher grade (1st Class). Exact numbers of awards are not known, since the Prussian archives were destroyed during the Second World War. The multitude of awards reduced the status and reputation of the decoration. Among the holders of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class was Adolf Hitler, who held the rank of Gefreiter. Hitler can be seen wearing the award on his left breast, as was standard, in many photographs. The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, the emblem of the Wehrmacht, first used in a narrower form on Luftstreitkräfte aircraft in mid-April 1918, and as shown here, as it appeared on German planes, tanks, and other vehicles during the Second World War. Adolf Hitler restored the Iron Cross in 1939 as a German decoration (rather than Prussian as in earlier versions), continuing the tradition of issuing it in various grades. Legally it is based on the enactment Reichsgesetzblatt I S. 1573 of 1 September 1939 Verordnung über die Erneuerung des Eisernen Kreuzes (Regulation for the Re-introduction of the Iron Cross). The Iron Cross of the Second World War was divided into three main series of decorations with an intermediate category, the Knight’s Cross, instituted between the lowest, the Iron Cross, and the highest, the Grand Cross. The Knight’s Cross replaced the Prussian Pour le Mérite or “Blue Max”. Hitler did not care for the Pour le Mérite, as it was a Prussian order that could be awarded only to officers. The ribbon of the medal (2nd class and Knight’s Cross) was different from the earlier Iron Crosses in that the color red was used in addition to the traditional black and white (black and white were the colours of Prussia, while black, white, and red were the colors of Germany). Hitler also created the War Merit Cross as a replacement for the non-combatant version of the Iron Cross. It also appeared on certain Nazi flags in the upper left corner. The edges were curved, like most original iron crosses. The standard 1939 Iron Cross was issued in the following two grades: Iron Cross 2nd Class Eisernes Kreuz 2. Klasse, Iron Cross 1st Class Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse abbreviated as EKI or E. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other military contributions in a battlefield environment. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: when in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar, for everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button. The Iron Cross First Class was a pin-on medal with no ribbon and was worn centered on a uniform breast pocket, either on dress uniforms or everyday outfit. It was a progressive award, with the second class having to be earned before the first class and so on for the higher degrees. It is estimated that some four and a half million Second Class Iron Crosses were awarded in the Second World War, and 300,000 of the First Class. The item “8909 German Iron Cross First Class medal post WW2 1957 pattern maker DEUMER” is in sale since Wednesday, March 31, 2021. This item is in the category “Collectables\Militaria\World War II (1939-1945)\Medals/ Ribbons”. The seller is “a..anderson” and is located in ST. ALBANS. This item can be shipped worldwide.